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Gentle Giant At The Golders Green Hippodrome - New DVD!


Geoff Grace

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Gentle Giant has released a follow-up DVD to its Giant On The Box 1974 concert from German TV station ZDF. Here's the link:

 

GG At The GG

 

From the Gentle Giant Music site :

New! The official release of the famous BBC "SIGHT & SOUND" concert from January 1978, at the Golders Green Hippodrome. Audio comes from the BBC Radio 1 Simulcast. There is also a commentary track by Gary, John, Derek, Kerry & Ray!

 

Extras include TV film from "The Old Grey Whistle Test" in 1974, and promo video footage from 1976 and 1978.

 

We've included a bonus audio CD of the concert and "Old Grey Whistle Test."

 

There is also Super 8 footage from April 1975, filmed in Munster, Germany by Martin Buntrock with audio added by Klaus Buntrock.

 

As always, Gary has provided a superb gallery of pics, plus some live shots & memorabilia.

 

Finally, Kerry has composed new music for the intro and menus, with drumming by John "Pugwash" Weathers taken from multitracks provided by our old friend Dan Bornemark.

Best,

 

Geoff

 

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http://homepage.mac.com/musicproduction/.Pictures/GentleGiant.jpg

My Blue Someday appears on Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Amazon

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Originally posted by Geoff Grace:

[QB]

Originally posted by Odyssian:

Is this one as good as Giant on the Box is?

Does it really matter? :D

 

You know it's gonna be good! :thu:

 

Best,

 

Geoff

 

-----

 

 

Good point, Geoff. :)

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Thanks for the welcome back guys -

 

Oh, where do I start?

 

I guess, after SSS left town, I decided to take a break for a while.

 

In the interim, I got my EMT certification, finished 3 full length albums, got a full time job, started an audio consulting company on the side, upgraded my studio, and started gigging with 4 new bands.

 

Whew!

 

But I'm back in the regular groove now, so hopefully I'll be able to be around a bit more! :)

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Originally posted by Soundscape Studios.:

In the interim, I got my EMT certification, finished 3 full length albums, got a full time job, started an audio consulting company on the side, upgraded my studio, and started gigging with 4 new bands.

:eek:

 

...and you sleep when, exactly? :D

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Ah, this might be one I need to break open the piggy bank for, as I saw GG in '78 (Missing Piece tour) and it remains (along with Little Feat in the same year) one of the greatest concerts I've been to. Granted, part of that is being 16 and just getting into the groove of concert going. Part of it is also how extraordinarily great they played (and sounded! They made a collge gymnasium sound like a fine hifi!)
Check out the Sweet Clementines CD at bandcamp
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  • 1 month later...

Finally got a chance to watch "GG at GG" DVD, and I just spent the last hour searching the 'net trying to identify two of Kerry Minnear's keyboards from the BBC concert. Think I found 'em.

 

His main stack is the same: C3-Wurlitzer EP-Clavinet D6

To his right: Fender Rhodes-mystery synth-Minimoog

 

The "mystery synth" is what he plays the "Free Hand" synth solo on, and I've always been curious what the heck that warbly sound was. There's a couple close shots, so I had something to go on. Turns out it's a Yamaha SY-2.

http://www.synthmuseum.com/yamaha/yamsy201.html

 

To his left, so facing the audience when he plays it: Yamaha Electone YC-45D (!)

http://www.xs4all.nl/~wkoopman/electone/details/yc-45d.htm

 

Most odd, and rare. He plays it on the middle section of "Two Weeks In Spain" and it's the exact same sound as on the original recording, so it means this thing was actually in his arsenal for a couple years. Further proof that it was in his rig on "The Missing Piece" record: on "Memories Of Old Days," you know the beautiful, delicate recorder synth line?--on the DVD, he plays it on the YC-45D! Unfortunately, there's some technical problem and it can't be heard, so he abandons it and continues playing the line on the Wurli--not the Minimoog or SY-2.

 

The BBC concert was shot in January1978, and shows Gentle Giant after relentless touring beginning to fray around the edges ever so slightly. Still, to all who've acquired the taste I highly recommend this DVD.

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Never heard of them. An internet search turns up this: A unique, British progressive rock band that released 12 albums between 1970 and 1980. Their music combined diverse elements from rock, classical, blues, Renaissance music, jazz, and the avante-garde. The music is both beautiful and challenging to the ear. If you are a fan of Yes, ELP, 20th-century classical composers, or similarly challenging music, you owe it to yourself to check out Gentle Giant.

 

So, they sound interesting. I am a fan of early Genesis...are they anything like that?

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Originally posted by CraigT:

So, they sound interesting. I am a fan of early Genesis...are they anything like that?

Craig, they were certainly more like early Genesis than, say, the Eagles; but your Internet source was right in calling Gentle Giant "unique." In many ways, they were like no one else.

 

You can hear excerpts of their music at sites like Amazon.com or the iTunes Music Store.

 

Best,

 

Geoff

 

-----

 

http://homepage.mac.com/musicproduction/.Pictures/GentleGiant.jpg

My Blue Someday appears on Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Amazon

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CraigT,

 

Most aficianados of progressive rock will rank Gentle Giant at the very top of the heap.

 

I would call early Genesis both more "pretty" and melodic than GG. GG had some very synchopated elements to their music, and lots of countermelodies.

 

You could say Genesis was Renaissance (homophonic), and GG was definitely Baroque (polyphonic and contrapuntal).

 

Although the "how the @#$% did they play that" factor is pretty high, the music stood on its own, and their technical chops always served the music instead of aimless wanking.

 

The members also could sing amazing acapella madrigals and all played 5 or 6 instruments.

 

I would recommend starting your GG listening with the album "Free Hand", which seems to be the most accessible for first time listeners. If you dig it, check out "Octopus" and "Power and the Glory" next. Then "In a Glass House" and the rest.

 

Undefeated champions, indeed.

Moe

---

 

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Re: GG and the more popular prog bands, I consider GG to be by far the must musically satisfying and (as Mate-Stubb has suggested) wank-free of all the major prog bands. There's a sharpness and a resolution to their lines that is, to my mind, the antithesis of block chord "prog majesty." There is also so much bouncy, buoyant rhythmic activity that the stuff sometimes borders on funk.

 

That said, I could see where other prog bands--in particular other Prog singers-- might be more emotionally satisfying than the Shulmans. The Gabriel of early Genesis, for example, was so playful in lnaguage and rich in characters and generally free of pseudo-philosophy. Sure, they did plenty of "The Seven Robes of Fergus, Canto IV: Thaus Speaks the Circle of Fire" type stuff, but they also did plenty of sharp, brilliant things like "The Battle of Epping Forrest," in which I find none of the lyrical trappings of "Prog Majesty."

 

Shulman lyrics aren't all sword and sorcery castle rock, but they are rarefied and remote--a kind of intellectualized parallel of the music. Also, Derek's voice is kind of cold, Ray's kind of syrupy. GG wouldn't be my go-to band for lyrics or for really engaging vocalists, even though Derek is effective in his way.

 

GG is all about the joys of complexity--no ecclesiastical robes or dry ice required. And I think that's a fine pleasure that no one should have to apologize for. But then again, I like James Joyce too...

Check out the Sweet Clementines CD at bandcamp
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Originally posted by Steve LeBlanc:

cool...looking forward to getting a copy

I got it about two weeks ago. I really like The Missing Piece, so I'm totally digging it; plus, there's a ton of material from Free Hand, which is one of my fave GG records.... :thu:

 

Watching them do On Reflection just kills me, man. :eek::cool:

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Originally posted by Magpel:

That said, I could see where other prog bands--in particular other Prog singers-- might be more emotionally satisfying than the Shulmans.

Just to clarify, Kerry Minnear (keyboards), is the other main vocalist in the band. Yes, a singing keyboardist that is also one of the greatest ever keyboard players. That is, unless he's playing cello or vibes. ;)

 

GG's vocals are very satisfying to me. Their 5-part harmony, and two lead vocalists, rivals all of the studio efforts of ANY other band out there, prog or not.

 

Free Hand can certainly be a good starting point. I started differently, but any keyboardist (one that actually plays keyboards) should have some GG in their music collection. NOTHING on their albums was ever sequenced or looped or arp'd or smeared or any other of the 'faking it' terms we hear today.

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Originally posted by soundscape:

Originally posted by Soundscape Studios.:

You got me out of the woodwork for this one Geoff!!

 

Thanks man - good to be back!

Ah crap. I guess I need a name change. :cry:
Hey man, that's OK - the guy's in GG were mostly named Schulman, but each unique in his own way!

 

So we can be brothers too!

 

 

As far as the DVD - just awesome stuff. I personally thought that the "Giant on the Box" was a better simply because the material they played was more of their classic repetoire, as opposed to the GG at the GG disc which had some later bits like "Two Weeks In Spain" and a few others. Nonetheless, a superb disc.

 

One of the reasons why GG will stand the test of time is simply because the depth of the compositions were so amazingly pure and heartfelt. If anyone has the box set "Under Construction" or "Scraping The Barrel", you can actually hear Kerry's demos - some of that stuff brings tears to my eyes....

 

 

The fact that they were ridiculous players just added to the sweetness of it - making them unquestionably the greatest band to ever exist, period. The vibes solo on "Funny Ways" is one of my all time favorite moments of any music I've ever heard. Any Kerry wasn't even technically a vibes player!

 

It's all about the music, boys....

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Originally posted by Prague:

Originally posted by Magpel:

That said, I could see where other prog bands--in particular other Prog singers-- might be more emotionally satisfying than the Shulmans.

Just to clarify, Kerry Minnear (keyboards), is the other main vocalist in the band. Yes, a singing keyboardist that is also one of the greatest ever keyboard players. That is, unless he's playing cello or vibes. ;)

 

GG's vocals are very satisfying to me. Their 5-part harmony, and two lead vocalists, rivals all of the studio efforts of ANY other band out there, prog or not.

 

I utterly agree that their ensemble vocals are fanatstic ("On Reflection," anyone?) and I didn't mean to imply that the lead vocalists were by any means bad, just not the main reason, IMO, to listen to them.

 

I think it was Derek's voice more than any other factor that made GG such a tough sell in America even during the height of prog's popularity, when audiences were more tolerant of long form songs and "serious composer" aspirations in a rock band.

Check out the Sweet Clementines CD at bandcamp
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Originally posted by Magpel:

I think it was Derek's voice more than any other factor that made GG such a tough sell in America even during the height of prog's popularity, when audiences were more tolerant of long form songs and "serious composer" aspirations in a rock band.

Not that I ever heard. Dylan was popular, so Derek's vocals had little to do with it. :D

 

Besides, GG never did any songs that were even 10 minutes long. I think their longest was less than 8.

 

They just never had a "hit" like Lucky Man/Roundabout/Aqualung/etc. Many great Prog bands didn't have this fortune. I would guess that an early hit for them could have been "A Cry for Everyone". The title was probably too long, though. :D

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