Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Seems the new Rhodes is Coming...


Cliffk

Recommended Posts

...or not, if you're sceptical, as I'm sure many would be. This email was posted last night to the Yahoo Rhodes group by Joe Brandstetter, the cat who owns everything 'Rhodes' now:

 

"Hi everyone,

We are working hard to finish five new models and intend to show at Namm January 2007.

Website comming that will keep you informed by fourth quarter 2006

Any qualified Rhodes technicians wishing to be factory authorized for warrantee service repair can register when the company website comes on line.

I support your community and have appreciated the suggestions in developing ,hopefully ,the greatest Rhodes electric piano line ever.

 

Til then,

 

Joseph A. Brandstetter"

 

Interesting, I thought.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 88
  • Created
  • Last Reply

God, let this be true. MIDI would be a huge asset, even if it's only MIDI transmission which seems likely. Please, a flat top.

 

It seems that the Rhodes would be one of the easier vintage instruments to reproduce accurately. It's fairly straightforward and many of the critical parts have already been remanufactured.

 

I hope the players support it. They would be wise to have strong international distribution. There are lots of vintage Rhodes that can be found in the USA for a reasonable price, but they are scarse in other parts of the world.

 

Busch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would think that with technology advances, that the engineering & manufacturing of the 'new' Rhodes should make it more lightweight and still have that awesome nostalgic Rhodes flavor. I do bring my Rhodes to my gigs but it's a major pain. Especially, since I drive a mustang and always have to find a different way to bring my 4X12 cabinet to the gigs. I'm exhausted by the time I'm setup. However, the 'real deal' always reenergizes me and the people at the shows appreciate the vintage, natural quality of the Rhodes versus the synth models.

Play only what you hear within...if you hear nothing, play nothing at all

My Gear: Motif; Ensoniq MR-76; Suitcase Rhodes; Earthquake MKII Pedal; DiscomBOBulator; PodXT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't pay that much, and I suspect they will cost even more than that, which will put them in the same situation as Hammond with their "New B3."

 

Why pay many times more for a "remake" when the original vintage instrument can be purchased used in great shape for much less?

 

For me, MIDI capability doesn't really make a difference. They'll have to make significant improvements in reducing the weight and size before I'd even consider buying a new one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Bobsk8:

It probably will not cost that much to manufacture if they build it in China or India.

Yeah, but the shipping would be killer if the new ones end up weighing as much as the originals.
"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I think it will cost a LOT to manufacture. This is an electromechanical piano with lots of moving parts. Wooden action, especially molded plastic hammers, metal tine frame, harmonic bars, and tines.

 

Not even considering the labor costs, the parts costs will be much higher than an electronic keyboard.

 

Probably much of it will have to be built by hand, since it's going to be a low volume product and therefore not worth setting up an automated assembly line for.

 

If it's using cheap plastic action and other parts, then it's not a worthy Rhodes anyway. Although to be fair, they would have to try pretty hard to make it play worse than some real Rhodes pianos I've played and owned LOL!

Moe

---

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?:

Originally posted by Bobsk8:

It probably will not cost that much to manufacture if they build it in China or India.

Yeah, but the shipping would be killer if the new ones end up weighing as much as the originals.
Whether or not the shipping costs are "killer" really depend on the volume they manufacture and where the key markets are. If made overseas they would most likely transport to the US via container ship, and with sufficient volumes the transport cost pales in comparision to the cost savings associated with Chinese manufacture.

 

That being said, while Chinese production standards have definitely improved in recent years, if I were dropping a few $K on a new Rhodes I'd personally feel more confident in a domestic construction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding weight. They might be able to get it down somewhat from the ~100lbs Mark V, but there is a lot of aluminum and plastic in the Mark V and those are about as light as you're going to get. I would still want wooden keys, wouldn't you? Also, with the Mark V (and the other Rhodes) the instrument IS the case. There are a lot of players today carting around 50+ lbs keyboards in 35+lbs case, add a 20 lbs stand into the equation.

 

This could very well be a boutique item, built by hand, expensive.

 

Busch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And then there is te best and the worst thing about a Rhodes.

 

The Action

 

Best

The action is different from a piano and makes you play it differently. It has a feel that creates it's own vibe makes you play at the speed the keys move. Makes that bellsy sound emanate, or the bark jump out.

 

Worst

The action is sloppy, slow and either too long a throw or if re-worked a short and odd feel. You couldn't learn a song on piano and play it the same on a Rhodes because of the different action.

 

Lastly, who owns a Peterson Stobe tuner? I mean if you own a Rhodes you are going to need to tune it. I used to tune mine ever 2 or 3 gigs because moving it would be enough to make those little springs shift.

 

You will also need a compressor to control the bark volumn as well as an EQ for the tone you want.

 

I tell you fella's, I truely love the sound of a Rhodes but I sure as heck won't ever go back to one.

 

It's like an old relationship, you tend to remember the good parts and forget the bad parts. Clones work good enough in a mix for me, and SOOOO much easier to live with.

Jimmy

 

Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others. Groucho

NEW BAND CHECK THEM OUT

www.steveowensandsummertime.com

www.jimmyweaver.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by BluesKeys:

It's like an old relationship, you tend to remember the good parts and forget the bad parts. Clones work good enough in a mix for me, and SOOOO much easier to live with.

Well said, Jim.

 

I wouldn't buy another Rhodes. No way.

 

I loved mine when it was the only thing out there, but I was in my early twenties then. Who would want to cart all that weight around today? And why would you want to maintain an electro-mechanical beast such as this when you can easily stash a 21 pound board like the Electro under your arm that fools the public 95% of the time?

 

The Rhodes' day has come... and gone. Let's move forward.

 

Besides. The Electro is RED :thu:;)

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, I rarely needed to tune mine, even when I was playing out once a week. Or maybe folks are being polite and I'm missing something!

 

But otherwise, I agree 100%.

 

I'm keeping mine but it's in the attic. Keeping it because

(a) I don't have to sell it

(b) It wouldn't fetch much money anyway

© I hope to sample it again some day

(d) It's fun to pull out for a while every few years, or if I ever I get a dedicated studio space again.

 

Plus with the cover on it makes a great table for unpacking guitars from their cases. I must confess I've used it as a workbench too.

 

But I wouldn't bother buying a new one, or even a nice cheap vintage one. Especially if it's not red. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by burningbusch:

If I had to play the Nord Electro as my sole keyboard every night, I would quit music.

 

Busch.

Seems a bit harsh. Granted, I own an Electro and I would not want it as my only keyboard, but I don't think I'd go so far as, say, becoming a drummer if it was my only board. It's a darn good little feller and you could certainly do a lot worse with some other boards as your only one.

 

Personally, if I was choosing only one board, I would pick the Electro over a Rhodes. Why? No tuning, lighter, more sounds, sounds darn good.

 

Returning to the thread topic, I don't see the point or market viability of producing a new Rhodes. Unless it can find its way back as a staple of the new music that is being produced, they are marketing to a limited class of people. Add the really good (lightweight) clones to the mix, and the class of potential purchasers drops further. Perhaps they would be better off doing what Hammond did and producing their own name-brand digitized Rhodes (or otherwise rent out their name to some other company).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by learjeff:

Jim, I rarely needed to tune mine, even when I was playing out once a week. Or maybe folks are being polite and I'm missing something!

 

But otherwise, I agree 100%.

 

I'm keeping mine but it's in the attic. Keeping it because

(a) I don't have to sell it

(b) It wouldn't fetch much money anyway

© I hope to sample it again some day

(d) It's fun to pull out for a while every few years, or if I ever I get a dedicated studio space again.

 

Plus with the cover on it makes a great table for unpacking guitars from their cases. I must confess I've used it as a workbench too.

 

But I wouldn't bother buying a new one, or even a nice cheap vintage one. Especially if it's not red. ;)

Thats funny, I'm using my guitar case on top a keyboard stand as a table to unpack my keyboard.And a work table for my drum machine or whatever purpose. :)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I consider the invention of the Rhodes a historic event for keyboard players worldwide. Yes, I know the Clavinet, Wurlitzer, Moog, etc. are also significant in keyboard history. Just like the Fender Strat, Gibson Les Paul, etc. for guitarists. You don't see Fender or Gibson stopping their continued revamping of their instruments. Granted, most of their guitars that are sold are significantly cheaper than what a new Rhodes would cost. However, to me, the Rhodes means a helluva lot. Technology can only do so much. Maybe the Nord Electro Rhodes sound better because of all the preset effects...that just tells me that people don't want to waste time with tweaking the original Rhodes to make it their own sound. I think of revamping the Rhodes like revamping the Ford Mustang. The late 60's models are classics but you almost have to be a mechanic to keep it up. When the new Stangs came out in 2000, and eventually the classic body style several years back, it made me want to buy one. I believe you can mix that nostalgic real feeling of the Rhodes with new technology and make it extremely marketable. All it takes is for several pop stars to incorporate it in their live shows, NAMM to make a strong push for it, and obviously, Keyboard Mag to do an in-depth feature on it.

Play only what you hear within...if you hear nothing, play nothing at all

My Gear: Motif; Ensoniq MR-76; Suitcase Rhodes; Earthquake MKII Pedal; DiscomBOBulator; PodXT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How slim and light weight can they possibly make a new Rhodes using modern materials and design? The Casio PX-110 is 27 pounds and a Kawai MP4 is 45 pounds. Can they put tines, hammers, dampers, harp and pickups in the new Rhodes and keep it slim and under 45 pounds?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by garrafon:

Returning to the thread topic, I don't see the point or market viability of producing a new Rhodes.

Thank you. Case closed.

 

We've passed the age of the electro-mechanical Rhodes. The Rhodes is dead, never to become a viable offering in the new (NOT pre-owned) keyboard marketplace.

 

You guys need to get a grip on reality. I don't care how much you loved your Rhodes. The market has changed. We've moved on to boards that do so much more, for much less money, and far fewer maintenance headaches.

 

This guy is introducing FIVE (5) models of Rhodes? He's going to fall flat on his face.

 

The truth hurts, but Sven Golly and I wouldn't invest our hard-earned money into this venture.

 

Nope. Ain't gonna happen. It's time to move forward with technology, not backwards with sentiment. :rolleyes:

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?:

Originally posted by garrafon:

Returning to the thread topic, I don't see the point or market viability of producing a new Rhodes.

Thank you. Case closed.

 

We've passed the age of the electro-mechanical Rhodes. The Rhodes is dead, never to become a viable offering in the new (NOT pre-owned) keyboard marketplace.

 

You guys need to get a grip on reality. I don't care how much you loved your Rhodes. The market has changed. We've moved on to boards that do so much more, for much less money, and far fewer maintenance headaches.

 

This guy is introducing FIVE (5) models of Rhodes? He's going to fall flat on his face.

 

The truth hurts, but Sven Golly and I wouldn't invest our hard-earned money into this venture.

 

Nope. Ain't gonna happen. It's time to move forward with technology, not backwards with sentiment. :rolleyes:

As much as I love the sound, I'm not going to carry one around to gigs if I can have a keyboard that makes something so close people can't even tell the difference. Or spend my money on a one deminsional instrument when I need to cover 10-12. I have to agree with Tom on the wisdom of trying to sell them. He may find enough market to keep himself busy , I'm sure some musicians with some discretionary income will buy them. (Boy.. is that an oxymorananical thought , A musician with money to burn)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel like I'm listening to a conversation about implementing technology to eliminate human error in baseball or something along those lines. Yes, the Rhodes is very heavy, but so is PA equipment and so is drum gear. I take pride in having a pretty massive setup compared to most keys player in my town. I also take pride in knowing that if I wanted to, I could use the Rhodes patches from my Motif, which are very good, but I like the real thing. I have a feeling that some of you like to fake piano sounds in the studio as well? Even if their is a true piano availble? Maybe not, but that's what it sounds like.

Play only what you hear within...if you hear nothing, play nothing at all

My Gear: Motif; Ensoniq MR-76; Suitcase Rhodes; Earthquake MKII Pedal; DiscomBOBulator; PodXT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is mind boggling to me that so many "musicians" can be so completely satisified with "musical instruments" that are 100% fake. You press a key and it emits the exact same sound every f%#$ing time. Keith Jarrett or a monkey could press a key on a Korg Triton combi and it would sound the same.

 

As far as I'm concerned, hardware and software VAs come WAY, WAY closer to emulating analog synths than any of the digital attempts to mimic electro-mechanicals. But the boutique analog synth business is doing OK. Why shouldn't we hope for the same with the electro-mechanicals? I don't get it.

 

The biggest thing anybody seems to care about is how much does it weigh? Why bother with anything else? The $299 Radio Shack piano will fool 95% of the people, doesn't weigh much at all, is cheap as hell. End of discussion. It's obviously the perfect instrument for today's lazy-ass, don't care what it sounds like keyboardist.

 

And yes, I can't imagine anything less inspiring than playing Rhodes patches all night on the Electro keyboard. Shoot me.

 

Busch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm amazed at some of the comments here. So we don't need new pianos , harpsichords , saxaphones you name it, just because technology can 'replicate' these sounds?

 

Never will I accept that way of thinking, a real instrument will always win in my book.

Anything else is a compromise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK. I take it all back. :rolleyes:

 

This guy is going to make a MINT introducing FIVE (5) new models of an electro-mechanical keyboard into the marketplace. :rolleyes:

 

And he's going to do it by asking $10,000 per keyboard. He will sell to the boutique market -especially those folks who love to show off lots and lots of keyboards in their rig no matter how much they weigh and what a pain in the butt it is to haul them to each gig. His customers will be all those 'rich' musicians who can afford a roadie, no doubt.

 

Look guys, I don't care about sentimentality. If you want to pretend that the introduction of a Rhodes into the musical instrument mass market will be a success, go ahead and dream.

 

If you think that this guy can make a living selling the Rhodes as a boutique instrument to the thousands upon thousands of 'rich' musicians out there... well, how about sharing a little bit of what you're smoking with me, huh? :rolleyes:

 

Sheesh.

 

And one more thing... of course I can tell the difference between a Rhodes and a clone. And of course I prefer the Rhodes. Again, this is not about sentiment, it's about a guy thinking he's going to be a business success by introducing five (5) new electro-mechanical Rhodes to the marketplace at this point in history. Please try to refrain from getting these points mixed up.

 

It's a nice dream. But dreams are cheap. Reality will bite this guy in the butt and anyone with any business sense knows it.

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The point for me is that _anyone_ who goes into the business of making interesting instruments for us to play is good in my book.

 

Who knows what innovations might come from this project. We may even end up with a totally new sound that lends itself to the musical history books, maybe not.

 

I just think as musicians we should support any venture like this as who knows where it will take us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Hobo:

I just think as musicians we should support any venture like this as who knows where it will take us.

I wish him all the best and, in that regard, I support him.

 

However, as much as it pains me, I agree with Tom. Hi Tom! :wave:

 

It is extremely unlikely that I would buy one of these and, as I previously stated, I think there are precious few who would. Thus, I think the likelihood for success remains small. That being said, I would be happy to be proven wrong. Hey, who knows, maybe Brittney, Maria, O Town, Kelly Clarkson, M&M, etc. will make the new Rhodes a mainstay of their acts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...