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RHODES RECORDING HELP


jazidup

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First, what's the output of the Rhodes ... stereo or mono? If you have a true stereo output why not go direct?

 

If the Rhodes is just a mono output, how are you planning to get stereo from that?

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Or just buy an effects unit that takes mono in and can put stereo out.

 

As an example, I have the Alesis Fazer attached to my Mini Korg.

 

The Alesis has a mono in that will transmute to a stereo phase shifter out.

 

I also have the Boss Gigadelay that offers the same type of thing.

 

Carl

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The Rhodes model with the speakers - the Suitcase model... was the signal simply panned between the two, or was there also vibrato added?

 

That would be the original stereo effect.

 

A Stereo flanger/phaser would be another.

 

I used a stereo chorus unit with mine.

 

That, plus some EQ and perhaps a tube-based front end, and you're good to go.

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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The original Suitcase had a pseudo-stereo effect, in which the mono audio output could be panned between the cabinet speakers at a variable rate, to create a stereo tremelo. This effect was also reproduced on the two line outputs, so you could take those two outputs direct, record them to left and right, and have a stereo auto-pan. It isn't stereo in the sense that there's a spatial difference between the left and right channels, but rather a simple two-channel panning. It's a bigger sound than the straight mono sound, at any rate.

 

I don't know if the Stage model had this effect - if you're renting the Stage model, you could create a pseudo-stereo effect by splitting the output, taking one side direct to the left channel, and running the right through a short delay, flanger, phaser, or chorus, or any combination of those. That way, you could get a bigger sound without needing stereo effects.

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Yup. My stereo BOSS chorus did this.

 

http://www.chrisguitars.com/boss-ce3-040430.jpg

 

One channel was straight - no funny stuff.

 

The other channel was modulated with a square wave & the pitch would drop a few cents, then come back to where it was.

 

In stereo this produced a nice chorus effect. I used a little of this often. I didn't use phasing and flanging effects much. If I wanted vibrato, I used the effect that was built into the Fender Bandmaster head I used. The speaker cab was RMI with two JBL 15" woofers and two Allen organ tweeters. Of course, back in the late seventies, it sounded pretty good. Today... I dunno.

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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I believe at one time you could buy the Rhodes preamp section used in the Suitcase to get both the stereo "vibrato" (really autopan as Richard says above) effect with a Stage (and more of the Suitcase sound), and I know that Speakeasy Vintage Music currently sells at least one preamp that recreates the effect. Unless I specifically want the Stevie Wonder "Living For The City" autopanned sound, however, I tend toward a stereo chorus or a split signal with one side through a short delay as others have already suggested.

 

Larry.

 

[Edited to add] forgot to say that I really don't think you'll like the results of the one amp/two mics setup you first described.

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