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I'm getting a digital piano for home use only...please make recommendations


eric

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Hey folks,

 

I have a couple of offspring that are getting ready to start on piano lessons. Not to mention their dad could use a little more time on the bench actually playing the piano vs. obsessing over live gear and synths, etc.

 

We have a really crap 1920's era upright piano in our living room that looks pretty, but plays like crap. I've had it tuned 2x and the tuner told me I *could* spend a lot of money trying to make this ratty thing into an instrument, but it is probably not worth it. So what I am proposing is a $1k-ish investment in a small digital piano that can sit on top of the covered upright's keyboard.

 

My first choice, based on a few years of demos, is the Yamaha P120. I really like the keyboard action (though a bit on the stiff side) and the piano sounds are stellar. It looks like a nice compact unit and it would fit well where I need it.

 

I have not played the P140 yet. Does anyone have other recommendations?

 

Regards,

Eric

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Far be it from me to offer you advice on an expert forum :D but I'll tell you what I think. If I were your mother, thinking of my son brown-bagging it everyday so that he could afford yet another electronic keyboard for my lovely grandchildren to embark on their musical journey, well, I'd put my foot down. If that means lending you the money to have that old piano moved out of your house, that's what I'd do. If it means giving you my piano to put in your house, that's what I'd do. If it means buying you a piano I'd probably borrow the money to do that too.

 

I'm shocked and appalled. ;)

 

And, how are your kids going to reach the pedals with your piano somehow balanced on top of another one? I know you can build pedal platform mechanisms for really little legs, but come on.

 

Get the Larry Fine book. Get interested in acoustics again. You too can afford the real thing. :)

 

Note: this has nothing to do with the P120. :rolleyes::D

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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"I have a couple of offspring that are getting ready to start on PIANO lessons. Not to mention their dad could use a little more time on the bench actually playing the PIANO."

 

Then, Eric, get a real, honest-to-God, acoustic PIANO !!

 

http://pictures.yamaha-europe.com/picture_archiv/products/10_Musical_instruments/pianos/upright_pianos/C-111_medium_jpg.jpg

 

You (and your wife) seem to be among the intelligent and fortunate ones that have both the stability and financial wherewithal to well be able to provide for your children. This is the perfect time to grasp the opportunity to launch these munchkins on a PIANO-based voyage of musical joy and fulfillment. Dad, these are your priceless kids!

Like any other tool or instrument, buy quality, perhaps even the best piano that you can afford. Even a second-hand Yamaha, Kawai, Heintzman, etc. will please you and them to no end, and be worth as much as you originally paid for it in the years to come.

 

Also, dig this: http://www.pacpubserver.com/new/news/5-20-00/magicaltouch.html

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Originally posted by Jeep:

Then, Eric, get a real, honest-to-God, acoustic PIANO !!

:idea::)

 

 

Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?:

Good having you back, Sue.

hahaha, nice that you're still here, Tom. :D Should I push my luck and tell eric that I think he's confusing stellar with safe? nahhh.... ;)
"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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Thanks for the suggestions. I would indeed love to have a Yamaha upright like this:

 

http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/Images/Pianos/Product/Main/U1PE.gif

 

I will eventually inherit a 6' Kawai Concert Series grand piano from my father, so I'm hesitant to invest in another fine instrument at this point.

 

The comments about keyboard and pedal height are good ones and I had thought about this. Not sure of the best solution or if we will even put the potential digital piano on top of the upright or not. It may stand alone.

 

Regards,

Eric

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Originally posted by eric:

I would indeed love to have a Yamaha upright like this:

http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/Images/Pianos/Product/Main/U1PE.gif

Yeow! A U1 !!

NOW you're talking... :)

 

"I will eventually inherit a 6' Kawai Concert Series grand piano from my father."

 

Eric, the key word in your statement is "eventually".

Your children are at their prime age NOW .

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Get a second opinion on the 1920's junker. I have one from that era and with some regulation and a bit of felt work it sounds awesome.

Just think, your kids will be able to practice in the living room bashing away on the old family piano just like we all did. Real strings, real wood,real playing. You could yell at them from the kitchen to get practicing, just like your parents probably did. They won't be able to do fake practicing without the headphones. You can't get all that with an electronic piano.

I second the opinion on Larry Fines book it's an awesome resource.

Stephen

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Eric! :D Once in a while I sneak a look at the KSS forum, and I see that you've cross-posted your request for a recommendation. Someone mentioned that they're particularly fond of Generalmusic products. Now in the year that I've been following you around, I've never once heard you acknowledge that Generalmusic exists. So, I'm dying here. Lay it on me. What do you think?

 

advance apologies to anyone who may be of the opposite opinion ;) (assuming the worst)

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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I've heard tales of Generalmusic sightings, but most that have actually been investigated are explainable as swamp gas or other natural phenomena...

 

:D (Hi Sue!)

 

Daf

I played in an 8 piece horn band. We would often get bored. So...three words:

"Tower of Polka." - Calumet

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Originally posted by opp:

Just think, your kids will be able to practice in the living room bashing away on the old family piano just like we all did. Real strings, real wood,real playing. You could yell at them from the kitchen to get practicing, just like your parents probably did. They won't be able to do fake practicing without the headphones. You can't get all that with an electronic piano.

 

Wow... Does that bring back some memories, or what? :D:thu:
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Wow... Does that bring back some memories, or what?
How about: "USE THE SOFT PEDAL! Laugh-In just started!" -Dad

 

On the topic: I started teaching my daughter when she was 3, and I got her a little Casio keyboard because her hands were too small to do much on our acoustic.

 

But as soon as they're big enough, she's going acoustic.

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Stoo,

 

I Googled Neahkahnie Mountain and here's what I found.

 

CLONK HERE FOR MORE PICTURES

 

http://www.intangibility.com/Photography/Collections/GJ/GJ_228/GJ_228_03_triplefalls3.jpg

 

How can we get an invitation to come visit with you? I'm sure others are like me and won't mind bringing gifts; food, wine, musical instruments to perform on a Saturday night overlooking the bluffs...

 

Whatdayasay ol' buddy? :P

 

Tom

Is There Gas In The Car? :cool:

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Originally posted by gangsu:

Now in the year that I've been following you around, I've never once heard you acknowledge that Generalmusic exists. So, I'm dying here. Lay it on me. What do you think?

What is Generalmusic? Never heard of them. :D

 

That's actually a fair question - I have never once been in any proximity to a Generalmusic keyboard. None of the dealers in my area carry them and I know not one person around me that has ever used one. I have seen some favorable reviews and had a little bit of intrigue, but I've not really been in the market for their core products. Their flagship (I think the ProMega 3?) is probably the most up my alley from a gigging standpoint, but the thing is rather large and I'm trying to slim down, if anything. My Yamaha S90 fills this role nicely.

 

As for Generalmusic home pianos, I know nothing about them. I was looking at the Yamahas and maybe Kawais based on some time I've spent playing them.

 

I have been going through a bit of GAS for a real upright after looking at Yamaha's website - but I don't think I can currently afford $5k+ on a U1 or whatever. Used ones are not very prevalent in my area - I've already perused the classifieds and also the local stores inventory of used Yamaha uprights. Plus, there's the "eventuality" of getting a really nice Kawai grand piano down the road.

 

I may make them slog it out on the old upright for now and I may also get a digital. Still investigating my options.

 

Regards,

Eric

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Eric, for what it's worth let them slog it out on the old piano, or rent. I played a 50 yr old Kimball upright for the first 8 years and it was pretty rough. It had a few stuck keys at the bottom and a busted sound board. But it made me appreciate a good sounding piano when I finally got one.

 

Everyone needs to suffer. It's how you learn the blues and starts the GAS process.

Jimmy

 

Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others. Groucho

NEW BAND CHECK THEM OUT

www.steveowensandsummertime.com

www.jimmyweaver.com

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Originally posted by eric:

What is Generalmusic? Never heard of them. :D

:D

Pardon me for not getting back to you sooner. I have this crabapple tree that I had to deal with before the black bears sniffed it out. Every day the headlines read More Bears In City! They say if a bear crosses your path, lift your arms and it will think you're really big and run off. right...

 

No generalmusic dealers in your town either. Hahha, that's a good reason to look elsewhere. I have to confess, I used to think I was at a disadvantage living in the north, unable to audition the things that most intrigue me. But it looks to be the same the world over.

 

The P120 gets my nod as a fine beginner instrument ;) as long as you get the whole package. The P120 stand is the key to making this thing feel like a real piano. We know we all lie about pro stands being rock solid. Even an acoustic action would feel like crap if it jiggled.

 

And that's all I have to say about that.

 

Thanks for your response. :)

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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I guess I will take the opposing view. When I started taking lessons my parents bought a cheap Wurlitzer upright of some type. That thing drove me crazy. The keys were slow, the upper octaves would stick, and tech after tech failed to fix the problem. A good acoustic piano is great. A crappy acoustic piano can do more harm than good. I can only wish I had something like a P-120 when I was growing up. Moral of this story; A good digital is better than a crappy acoustic any day.

 

Flip side. An old Boston piano has been floating around in our family for over 50 years. The piano was made sometime in the late 1800s. It is now back with my parents and when I build a house it will be mine. Im sure it needs some hammers replaced and a tuning, but the action is wonderful. An old used piano can be good if you find the right one. :thu:

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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I have a Chickering in my livingroom. I believe it to be console height, but it's been a while since I measured it.

 

My father bought this piano for my mother in the early sixties. My brothers, sister and I all took piano lessons and practiced on it. Later, I was the one who received it as a wedding gift.

 

Not too many years ago I had the action rebuilt. The action was tightened and the felt on the hammers was 'fluffed up'. I'm sure there's a technical word to describe it, but what was done included using a sharp pin to prick the felt of the hammers that had become flat from years of use. A few strings were replaced & the piano was tuned and voiced. It sounds beautiful.

 

It needs to because I go crazier (I'm already on the edge) ;) when I'm in another room hearing someone else play and the piano may be a bit out of tune. Why does this happen that it bothers me more when I'm listening from another room? Perhaps I can hear the fundamentals better and don't get overwhelmed by the overtones. I don't know.

 

Nevertheless, I'm really fortunate to have both an acoustic piano as well as my PC2X. I enjoy playing them both.

 

Of course, the PC2X is somewhat purple, so I can't wear bright colors when I play it or I tend to frighten animals and small children. :freak:;)

 

PS... I'm not going back to this. http://www.littlekidstuff.com/images/melissa-doug-toy-piano-1314-big.jpg Don't ask me to. ;)

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Hey Eric!

 

If you're anywhere close to Ames, IA, I have a good solution for you. It's an Everett studio (not spinet) church model piano. Heavy duty, good tone, bought new by my mom who at one point owned 5 of them when she taught group piano.

 

Honey oak cabinet, needs tuning. Probably worth $2000, I'd take $1500. Nice deal for someone.

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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So lets shed some light on The Everett Piano Co. :)

 

Originated in Boston 1883, moved to South Haven, Michigan 1923. The factory was acquired by Yamaha 1973 for it's US operations. Until mid-1986, yamaha continued to manufacture 3 Everett pianos alongside it's own: a 41" console in "several levels of quality and cabinetry", a 45" studio "that was for years very popular in institutions" (sound like yours?), and a 48" similar to the Yamaha U1.

 

...later built by Baldwin, using Yamaha scale design and identified by the letter C, still later using original Everett designs. When Baldwin's contract ran out in 1989, Yamaha dropped the line entirely. Since 1995 most Everett models are made by the Dongbei Piano Co., China.

 

Plagiarized from The Piano Book, Larry Fine. See the book for more detail.

Current list price on the Everett 45" studio model available on request. ;)

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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Originally posted by DafDuc:

I've heard tales of Generalmusic sightings, but most that have actually been investigated are explainable as swamp gas or other natural phenomena...

 

:D (Hi Sue!)

 

Daf

There have been reports of Generalmusic abductions. The minds of the abductees seem to have been brainwashed. When they return they only praise Generalmusic and will have no talk of any other brand. It seems like a religious conversion to some. :cool:

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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