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What was the First Portable Computer?


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[quote]Originally posted by Groovepusher Sly: [b]What was the first portable? What was the first Laptop? What was the first modern (clamshell) Laptop? Somebody asked and I knew where to get the answer. Right here from the experts. Mucho thanks in advance. Sly :cool: [/b][/quote]I remember those Apple computers that were a box with monitor AND computer. Semi-portable. What did they call them, the Apple I or something?

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GT3, I think you're talking about the first Macintosh. I remember HP or Texas Instruments made a portable where the keyboard snapped on the front. But I don't think it was the first portable. [quote]Originally posted by ChristopherKemp:[b]the abacus.[/b][/quote]Wrong. It was the human brain. :p Sly :cool:
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[quote]Originally posted by Groovepusher Sly: [b]What was the first portable? What was the first Laptop? What was the first modern (clamshell) Laptop? Somebody asked and I knew where to get the answer. Right here from the experts. Mucho thanks in advance. Sly :cool: [/b][/quote]Without looking it up, I would have said Osborne's. Yup. [url=http://www.cedmagic.com/history/osborne-1.html]1981 Osborne link[/url]
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[quote]Originally posted by Doug Osborne: [b]Osborne 1. No relation. http://www.cedmagic.com/history/osborne-1.html IBM claims first, but it didn't fit under airplane seat. http://www.geocities.com/~compcloset/PortableEvolution.htm [/b][/quote]Osborne is right, you can also read about it here: http://oldcomputers.net/osborne.html 1981 $1795 64k ram 4mhz. [img]http://oldcomputers.net/pics/osborne.jpg[/img]
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Interesting tid bit: I still have (and it still works) a Commodore 64 color monitor that belonged to my brother that I have used on and off over the years as a second color monitor for video games and video movie watching. Before that it was my interface for WebTV! It's a hoot when I pull it out and people’s eyes boggle at the little C64 logo! :D - DJDM
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Kaypro II, released only months after Osbourne: [img]http://www.fortunecity.com/marina/reach/435/kpro2a.jpg[/img] [i]CPU is the Z80A atn 2.5 Mhz. 8 bit register. RAM: 64 kB., ROM: 2 kB. OS: CP/M ver. 2.2 . two 5.25 inch 191 kB. SS/DD diskette drives. 9 inch monitor, green phosphor. Resolution: text: 80x24; Graphics: 100x160. I/O: 1x parallel Centronics, 1x serial RS 232. A Winchester type hard disk up to 10 Mb. could be added. Language: BASIC.[/i] Zenith was probably first to sport a clamshell design: [img]http://www.obsoletecomputermuseum.org/zenith2/couple_z.jpg[/img] Do you remember this one?: [img]http://www.cis.rit.edu/~jerry/Hardware/museum/pics/102_down.jpg[/img] Tandy 102. A 1984 laptop. When Apple finally released their first Powerbooks in 1991 they pioneered the clamshell design by moving the keyboard closer to the screen and added a track ball in front of the keyboard. Almost instantly all other laptops adopted the concept (Apple did it again a couple of years later when they abandoned the trackball and adopted the trackpad): [img]http://www.lowendmac.com/pb/pb.jpg[/img] Atari Portfolio, 1989, the first clamshell palmtop computer?. A friend of mine got one of these. It was actually quite useful (and affordable too): [img]http://www.obsoletecomputermuseum.org/portfoli/portfol1.jpg[/img] Remember Terminator II? This was the computer used to rob the ATM machine. /Mats

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Thanks for the photos, Mats! Wow do I feel old, and I'm only 35! :rolleyes: :freak: My best friend entered pre-med in 1984 armed with the Kaypro II in the pic. At about the same time, I had a job in Appliances at the local K-Mart. We sold the portable version of the Commodore-64. Physically, it resembled the Kaypro. Among other things, it sported a [i]color[/i] screen. Of course, at around 4", you were likely to get eyestrain from long sessions on the computer. ;) [quote]originally posted by Yuri T.: [b]Remember those little Timex/Sinclair computers? [/b][/quote]Not only do I remember them, we sold them at K-Mart. When the Commodore-64 first hit the market, TI/Sinclair computers and computer project kits (You could buy these and build them yourself. Not the same as today's standardized connectors, etc. Get the soldering iron out! :D ) became totally obsolete. We reduced their price to $19.95 but refused to sell them at the discount until THE day the sale began. (Word was, TI was going to pull the calculator line and other products if anyone sold them cut rate before that date.) As the store opened, all hell broke loose as people streamed into the store and ran back to my department. I met some of the nicest, most patient people that day... ...and a lot of impatient, moronic a^%holes, as well! My brother worked at Radio Shack in college, and owned this one... [img]http://www.geocities.com/~compcloset/Radio_Shack_TRS-80_Model_100.jpg[/img] He loved it, and made used it for years. A bit OT; We lived together in 1991. At that time he had bought a program suite called Geoworks. Way ahead of it's time. A small connectivity company called A-m-e-r-i-c-a.. O-n-l-i-n-e.. bundled their connectivity software with Geoworks. Thanks to his job at a large, regional computer retailer my brother became one of the first users of AOL, back when they were simply a BBS and very simple browser. Seemed like a very forward thinking company back then. Very interested in their customers. In fact, when they began using a paid subscription model for membership, he recieved his service for half the going rate. Boy how times change!

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