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Digital for classical pianist


classicalkeyboard

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:confused:

 

Looking for some advice in selecting the right digital piano. I studied classical piano growing up and want to start playing again (mainly classical).

 

I am thinking of buying a digital piano for the relatively small size/portability as compared to a traditional piano, and the added attraction of being able to use headphones.

 

Doubt I'll use all the different functions and MIDI interface, though I do want to purchase a good quality keyboard with weighted keys and a rich sound that will keep me happy for at least a few years.

 

Would appreciate any recommendations for particular keyboards or for references to articles that may help me become a more informed consumer.

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Do a search or check reviews of:

Kawai MP9000 or MP9500

GEM Promega 2 or 3

Casio Privia

Yamaha P250

Keys: Hammond SK2, Hammond SK1, Hammond SKpro, Korg Vox Continental, Waldorf STVC

Amplification: Line6 L3T, Yamaha DBR-10, Presonus Air 10, Leslie 122V

 

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Well, niacin listed pretty much all of the recomendations you would be given by anybody else here. My additional advice would be to do some web research, starting here on this forum, using "search previous threads" option. Go and research for some possible targets on major manucfacturers or vendors (sweetwater. com, thomann.de, etc.) web pages. Finnaly go to the well equiped music shop and try various models yourself. Let your hands, hears and budget be the judge.

 

Faruk

Fat But Fast
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Don't forget to check out the Yamaha GranTouch models. You have a _grand piano action_ (real hammers but, of course, no strings) midied to an excellent piano sample. I own a GranTouch 1 (GT1) and never get tired from the sample. I have modified the action - a deeper key dip and the piano suits me just fine.

 

Link to Yamaha GranTouch

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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ahh, you lured me back in. But only to say that this has to be the dumbest most transparent initial post I've ever seen. You list no preferences in kybds at all, no price range, as if you've suddenly found yourself on another planet. It takes a degree of research just to find this little piece of paradise! My advice to you is to read a good book, maybe the importance of being ernest. I've never read it but it sounds about right.

 

Originally posted by classicalkeyboard:

:confused:

 

Looking for some advice in selecting the right digital piano. I studied classical piano growing up and want to start playing again (mainly classical).

 

I am thinking of buying a digital piano for the relatively small size/portability as compared to a traditional piano, and the added attraction of being able to use headphones.

 

Doubt I'll use all the different functions and MIDI interface, though I do want to purchase a good quality keyboard with weighted keys and a rich sound that will keep me happy for at least a few years.

 

Would appreciate any recommendations for particular keyboards or for references to articles that may help me become a more informed consumer.

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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Back! Back tiger! Whoopaaah!

 

If Gangsu was in a good mood she'd tell you she's a fan of the Promega 3. I would too, as I own one myself. Sue I believe is a fan of the Fazoli sample/model. I like the darker Steinway sound personally.

 

Some detail in the question would help though. Unless you specify otherwise, you're going to get money no object pro stage piano responses (short of go to Steinway Hall in Manhattan and try them out already).

 

Originally posted by gangsu:

ahh, you lured me back in. But only to say that this has to be the dumbest most transparent initial post I've ever seen. You list no preferences in kybds at all, no price range, as if you've suddenly found yourself on another planet. It takes a degree of research just to find this little piece of paradise! My advice to you is to read a good book, maybe the importance of being ernest. I've never read it but it sounds about right.

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ahh, you lured me back in. But only to say that this has to be the dumbest most transparent initial post I've ever seen. You list no preferences in kybds at all, no price range, as if you've suddenly found yourself on another planet. It takes a degree of research just to find this little piece of paradise! My advice to you is to read a good book, maybe the importance of being ernest. I've never read it but it sounds about right.

This is his first post, let's try and be nice. :cool:

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Thanks for your feedback, on the various models. I am surprised that my post aroused suspicion among some members.

 

It should be clear that:

1) I am not a professional musician (and really have no intention of becoming one)

2) I am not familiar with the digital option and am looking for resources

3) I trust the advice of expert musicians more than the advice of a salesperson

 

There is surprisingly little introductory information available online that I can find. The article I keep seeing popping up (http://allaboutpianos.com/digitalfaq.html) was written in 1997, and I am sure things have changed a bit since then!

 

Ok, I should have mentioned my price range. From the article above, I read that the difference between a low-end model and a mid-range model is usually pretty dramatic. The difference between a mid-range model and a high-end model is mostly in the "gadgetry" department and in amplifier power; most of the key elements don't vary a whole lot. That said, I would probably be looking for a mid-range model, which I would guess would be in the $1000-$1,500 range.

 

Perhaps my posting would be more appropriate on a different forum, but please do not misinterpret my inquiry as disingenuous.

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Try searching this forum (or the web) for digital piano shootout. If anyone knows the link off hand feel free to chime in. I think one of the forum members put together the site which has recorded samples of a variety of digital pianos playing the same selection. That help you to hear what you like.
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Welcome to the keyboard forum! I'm just a regular guy like you and I post questions here and sometimes try to post answers here as well. I occasionally piss off people with my posts so don't take any remarks from anyone personally.

 

A used Clavinova might do the trick as it looks like a spinet and you can use headphones. I would take my time and go to many music stores. You will probably save a bundle if you buy second hand.

 

Another option is to rent an electric piano from a music store. If you don't like it, you're not out too much money. Report back when you make a decision.

 

Roland and Yamaha seem to be the most bought brands and you might want to file that away.

 

Mention the city you live in and I'm sure someone will direct you to a large music store.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by classicalkeyboard:

That said, I would probably be looking for a mid-range model, which I would guess would be in the $1000-$1,500 range.

In your price range the Yamaha P120 deserves serious consideration. You can read dozens of user reviews here: Yamaha P120 Reviews . You can find it on sale for about $1000. With your budget, that leaves room for a nice pair of headphones like the Sennheiser HD580's.
"Playing the piano is my greatest joy, next to my wife; it is my most absorbing interest, next to my work." ...Charles Cooke
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Originally posted by classicalkeyboard:

Perhaps my posting would be more appropriate on a different forum, but please do not misinterpret my inquiry as disingenuous.

Your post was completely appropriate.

 

This is absolutely the forum to be asking such questions, and I apologize that you were met by such a response from one of our members. I have no idea what motivated it, but I can assure you that it does not represent the tone of this forum.

 

Please feel free to ask any questions that you'd like, and we'll try to be as helpful as possible. :thu::cool:

 

dB

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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

I apologize that you were met by such a response from one of our members. I have no idea what motivated it, but I can assure you that it does not represent the tone of this forum.

I was motivated by sheer vanity. I presumed to have recognized the poster, and interpreted his questions as an attempt to engage my attention.

 

But if I was wrong, then my response was truly abominable. I apologize! Post away, classicalkeyboard.

 

I also apologize to Dave Bryce and members of this forum who have my utmost respect.

 

Sue

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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I'm very happy with my Roland RD-700, and classical is 99% of what I practice.

 

That said, I am socking away cash for a real grand :)

 

-Paul

"You look hopefully for an idea and then you're humble when you find it and you wish your skills were better. To have even a half-baked touch of creativity is an honor."

-- Ernie Stires, composer

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I think we should create an automated digital piano wizard page and put it as a sticky thread. It asks some questions and puts out the list of possible models added with the usernames of the people here liking it.

 

Give it some title like: 'beginners: read this first, otherwise keyboard corner professionals will throw tomatoes'

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IMO there is no digital that will satisfy a well trained classical pianist.

 

That said, a good option is a Kawai MP9500 connected to a computer with Ivory running. That gives very good action with about the most musical soundengine.

 

Less hassle are flagships like the Yamaha P250 (Dave Horns favourite) and the Promega 3 (gangsu's favourite). These are generally accepted as fine instruments.

 

Below that, it is a crowded space of digital piano's all with some happy users and some disliking-it forum members. These things can be found in any digital musical instrument shop and you just need to test them out yourself.

 

My 2p.

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Originally posted by Dave Horne:

Don't forget to check out the Yamaha GranTouch models. You have a _grand piano action_ (real hammers but, of course, no strings) midied to an excellent piano sample.

So Da ve, how much did the road case for that beast cost?
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Originally posted by Byrdman:

Originally posted by Dave Horne:

Don't forget to check out the Yamaha GranTouch models. You have a _grand piano action_ (real hammers but, of course, no strings) midied to an excellent piano sample.

So Da ve, how much did the road case for that beast cost?
I just assumed he was not going to work jobs with it. I wouldn't want to move a GT1 even without a flight case. :cool:

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by capnzoot:

Damn, Sue, see? It's not ALL about you!

'tis too. Anyway, haven't you noticed I'm suffering enough abject humiliation over here already? Stop attacking my hominum! my homina? I demand an audience with the moderator! Wait, no I don't. :eek:

Thanks for stopping by Zoot. I feel so much better now. :D

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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Originally posted by classicalkeyboard:

:confused:

 

Looking for some advice in selecting the right digital piano. I studied classical piano growing up and want to start playing again (mainly classical).

 

I am thinking of buying a digital piano for the relatively small size/portability as compared to a traditional piano, and the added attraction of being able to use headphones.

 

Doubt I'll use all the different functions and MIDI interface, though I do want to purchase a good quality keyboard with weighted keys and a rich sound that will keep me happy for at least a few years.

 

Would appreciate any recommendations for particular keyboards or for references to articles that may help me become a more informed consumer.

Welcome to the forum, classicalkeyboard. :)

 

Here is the website that has the mp3s of all the various digital pianos, synth pianos, and piano plug-ins playing the exact same MIDI file! :eek: It's a pretty good basis for comparison.

 

If you like to while away the hours listening to mp3 demos of electronic instrnments--and who doesn't?--you will probably enjoy this site.

 

My personal favorite among hardware digital pianos, FWIW, is the Kurzweil PC2. Check it out! ;)

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The best advice? Go and PLAY them. Spend as much time as you need. You will live with the decision you make. Feel and sound are in the fingers and ears of the beholder. What someone else hates you may love - and, that's just fine. Like you, I was classically trained, wanted a true weighted hammer action keyboard, and was new to the world of digital instruments. I visited music stores over a six month period, playing and comparing various keyboards, and asking questions of all who would listen, before deciding on a Yamaha S90. Truth be told, I liked the feeling of the Yamaha P250 better than the S90, but I wanted an assortment of organ, electric piano and synth sounds, all in a lighter, smaller package.
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Originally posted by DKeenum:

I second that. You're going to have to play them. They all sound and feel differently.

well, that's easy to say. Impossible to find one store that carries them all. Or one city. Speaking of carrying them all, Toronto now lays claim to the first and only store in Canada (NA?) that has both Bosendorfer and Fazioli on the floor. That's cool!

 

So classicalkeyboard, let me off the hook here. Please come back!

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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I'm also looking into this market for a girl I know who plays classical piano music, but it's hard to know where to start, because many of the models are not that different from each other. Just look at the amount of pianos that yamaha offer today, and then there's a lot of discontinued pianos that you can buy second hand.

 

I think we all agree that this kind of piano HAS to be tried out before buying, but I'm sure there are users of this forum who has valuable experience on what to look for? For example, which of the Clavinovas models have you all tried out?

 

Personally I would like a Grantouch, but then I saw the price tag...

 

My advice to classical guy is to search your local area for second hand clavinovas (maybe technics pianos as well) and just drive around and try them.

Think before you think before you speak
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Originally posted by Carlito:

I'm also looking into this market for a girl I know who plays classical piano music....
My sister plays classical piano music.And she's still single.
Now we all know a girl who plays classical piano who's in the market.

 

Of course the necessary next question is, "Is she hot?" to which I would imagine Carlito would do as all good brothers would do (including myself) and say she's my sister and proceed to beat the snot out of the person who asked. I suppose in this case, some sort of quasi-cyber beat down.

 

Oh classicalkeyboard where art though? Didst we scarest thee away? We're not all crazy starving artists looking for love on the internet. I hope we helped them at least wherever they are.

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Originally posted by Immordino:

Now we all know a girl who plays classical piano who's in the market.

 

Of course the necessary next question is, "Is she hot?"

Of course she is, she's one of MY friends :)

 

Point is, she doesn't care about other sounds than piano, she doesn't know what a sampler is, and she probably thinks midi is some kind of foreign animal or something.

 

And she's looking for a piano, not me...(bummer)

 

Has anyone any experience with the CLP series of the clavinovas f.x?

Think before you think before you speak
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