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What should I do for my 40th Bday?


MIDIdiot

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a little background:

- married w/ 3 young children

- no money to spend on gear

- frustrated pianist

 

I'm thinking of how to spend a nite out, jazz club or something. How can I make it a musical bday. Was thinking of visiting the music store since I haven't done that in many years.

 

Note, I have put on my wish list, the Mark Levine book as well as the Bill Evans vol. 1 & 2 piano book...

 

Any creative ideas you guys have appreciated!

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Originally posted by InTheDark:

a little background:

- married w/ 3 young children

- no money to spend on gear

- frustrated pianist

 

I'm thinking of how to spend a nite out, jazz club or something. How can I make it a musical bday. Was thinking of visiting the music store since I haven't done that in many years.

 

Note, I have put on my wish list, the Mark Levine book as well as the Bill Evans vol. 1 & 2 piano book...

 

Any creative ideas you guys have appreciated!

Put on some Ramones records! Actually if you are only forty, that's probably not going to cheer you up. If you were my age they remind one both of ones youth and that getting old is better than the alternative.

 

Why are you a frustrated pianist? Forty is a good age to start fixing that.

 

If you pick up Levines Jazz Piano book get his Jazz Theory book too.

 

If you are actually keeping your chops up, another fun book is "The right hand according to Art Tatum".

 

Anybody got a good recommendation for a Bebop text book?

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From Byrdman:

Why are you a frustrated pianist? Forty is a good age to start fixing that.

I say that because after roughly 20 yrs I have not made a real good attempt at crossing from a pop (some classical) background to jazz although countless times I have wanted to. So now when I start 'planning' to get cracking at it, I also get a little disheartened since it still hasn't happened. But it's great to hear you say that 40 is a good time to start fixing! Actually, as a 'youth', all I ever wanted was to play like Roy Bittan, to do the incredible things he does in a pop-based format, so silky smooth, his playing just flows and flows, it's so bright. As Springsteen himself has said, Roy was the signature sound behind so many of his records. I just started listening again to 1978 radio broadcast. For whatever reason, this recording has the piano so up front and center, you can hear everything Roy does on that perfectly! I've always wanted to learn that entire concert back to back. What amazing playing. My ear has always been decent but with limits. That's the frustrating part. I can follow up to a certain point and then it's like, "well what the hell did he do there!". I kind of feel the same way reading some of the jazz posts here on chords, improvizing etc, I can follow the first few steps and then it just gets entangled for me.

Sorry, I was rambling. How about wishing for a little more clarity for my 40th!

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If you were single, I could suggest a LOT of great things to do. Being married would put you in divorce court. Can you say "Child support"

 

IF you don't have any money for gear, stay clear of a music store, that's not good for you. I would also suggest the Marc Levine Book, The Jazz Piano Book, which I really love. I can't say the same for the Theory Book, I don't have it. If you decide to get any of them, get one at a time. One can overwhelm you pretty well. :)

 

I'd go the Jazz Club route, safer. Have a happy one! I wish I was only 40.

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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I'm not sure where you live or of your history, but here are a few suggestions that may or may not work.

 

Drive back to to your birth place and see how things have changed.

 

Drop in on an old hangout or visit a restaurant you liked 20 years ago.

 

Visit some antique stores and look for a few trinkets from the 70's and 80's.

 

Spend the day on the computer downloading and testing some of the great free VSTi's. It is like getting yourself a new musical instrument for the birthday, but free.

 

Go to a ballgame and forget about music.

 

Find a big used CD shop and pack a lunch.

This post edited for speling.
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I hope it's not your bd today! Happy Birthday already, if it is.

There's probably not a woman who hasn't done the same, but it occured to me one year, that the best gift for the man in my life might be black, well-cut, not cheap either mind you, well, you get the idea. Maybe you're in for a surprise! Get a babysitter, rent a room at the local Days Inn, geez do I have to tell you everything? :rolleyes::D

"........! Try to make It..REAL! compared to what? ! ! ! " - BOPBEEPER
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Welp...first I'd like to say Happy Birthday!

 

My two cents are as follows...

 

Sometimes it's a good thing to get away from music. I find that when I do that, I appreciate it even more when I get back to it. Variety is the spice of life, they say. I tend to believe that.

 

Heck, take the wife out somewhere. Enjoy a ballgame, have a steak, take a drive to another city to do it in. Do something different to break up the monotony that life tends to put us in. Then, when you get back, write an epic tune and share it with us! :)

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tell the wife you would like to take a class or 2,maybe jazz piano, at your local junior college. Start hanging around others who share the same interests in music you do. Find a bass player and drummer to get together and play a little. Teach your kids all about what you know and love about music.

When I was 40 my kids were also small and never a dime to buy any gear. But i always played in a band where #1 I had fun and also tried to make a few $. Music has allowed me to keep my sanity. Even now at 52 after a hard week at work or whatever, when the band goes out and plays on Sat. night, for 3 or 4 hrs. a week I can forget about the world and just plug into my soul.

Happy Birthday,always remember the family, and keep on playing,its' in your soul

gary

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Originally posted by InTheDark:

From Byrdman:

Why are you a frustrated pianist? Forty is a good age to start fixing that.

I say that because after roughly 20 yrs I have not made a real good attempt at crossing from a pop (some classical) background to jazz although countless times I have wanted to. So now when I start 'planning' to get cracking at it, I also get a little disheartened since it still hasn't happened. But it's great to hear you say that 40 is a good time to start fixing! Actually, as a 'youth', all I ever wanted was to play like Roy Bittan, to do the incredible things he does in a pop-based format, so silky smooth, his playing just flows and flows, it's so bright. As Springsteen himself has said, Roy was the signature sound behind so many of his records. I just started listening again to 1978 radio broadcast. For whatever reason, this recording has the piano so up front and center, you can hear everything Roy does on that perfectly! I've always wanted to learn that entire concert back to back. What amazing playing. My ear has always been decent but with limits. That's the frustrating part. I can follow up to a certain point and then it's like, "well what the hell did he do there!". I kind of feel the same way reading some of the jazz posts here on chords, improvizing etc, I can follow the first few steps and then it just gets entangled for me.

Sorry, I was rambling. How about wishing for a little more clarity for my 40th!

Work through Levines book and listen to the sounds of the chords. Work everything through all the keys even though its a chore.

 

Ears are practice just like anything else. Its like learning a foreign language - when you can tell where one work stops and the next one starts you are making progress. At first it all just sounds like hoo-hoo-hoo. Same things true of chords. You learn to recognize chords and chord sequences just like learning words in a language its the total sound that you recognize not individual components.

 

Its also a good idea to play whats in your head without worrying about what the chords are. Grab a fistfull of notes and if it sounds good try to work out what the heck you just did on theoretical grounds. And if it really sucks just keep at it - in fact if it does not suck much of the time you are not doing it right because you are not leaving your comfort zone.

 

Note though that some of the cool things you will come up with aren't in any book - theory is merely a path to learning and a crutch to lean on when you need it, not an end in itself.

 

The most important thing is to not buy into the "talent" bullshit. There is no such thing - there is such a thing as hard work. Otherwise known as "wood shedding".

 

And find some people to play with. Its loads of fun and really good for your ears.

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Jazz piano lessons... 40 is the perfect age to start. Dedicating yourself to improving on the piano will pay dividends for the remainder of your life. My dad is 71 and he now regrets that he didn't take my advice and start jazz piano lessons when I recommended it to him (late 50s).

 

Get a nice piano and start playing again. Pay for lessons for your kids too. It'll make them brainy and adept at nearly everything.

David Tobocman

www.edgewisemusic.com

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I love a lot of the answers I got, thank you, especially inspiring, Byrdman and pursuitboy! No, the big day hasn't arrived yet, that'll be on the 14th. If I can finally beat procrastination or at least get a leg up on it at the age of 40, I will 'start' with Levine book start exercising my ears. I must stop putting off getting my kids exposed as well. I had enrolled one of my twin boys (6 yrs old) in a piano course this fall but he hated the group thing (which involved some singing). It wasn't worth seeing him get so upset every saturday before going. But he definitely has a musical ear, always has. I feel terrible cuz it's wasting til now so we have to pick it up again, and for my other two as well. My band thing has never really worked out gig wise but as long I can keep playing in whatever capacity, that's the key. I also the love the idea of the grand piano home equity plan as well as jazz lessons but those just will not happen at this juncture. I'm afraid it's all up to my digital 88 key, my own resources, the occasional book and you guys!
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