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you just inked a new record deal and the company will buy you 3 pieces of gear ...


TrancedelicBlues

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That's a rather odd way of compensating. Either way, I'd rather have the money - no company would just give me a Yamaha CS-80, a Moog Modular 55, and an Arp 2600 in pristine shape ;) .

 

Albeit that I'm not against the idea of a nice big grand either :) .

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Originally posted by TrancedelicBlues:

myself, i want the new Hammond B3, a ProMega 5, and an Andromeda...

 

that should cover all the bases...

Check the fine print. You will almost certainly find that its coming out of your advances. In other words the money is coming out of your pocket not theirs.

 

And there may be conditions attached whereby they retain ownership but you are responsible for loss or damage. That way they get the gear if your act bombs.

 

And if you need a truck to move the stuff, that's going to cost you too. Quite commonly the company takes 95% of the profits but all the expenses get paid out of your 5%.

 

Bottom line - get a good lawyer before you sign, and make sure its not one recommended to you by the label.

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I imagine this is a hypothetical situation? Regardless, what Byrdman said. Given the sneaky nature of recoupable expenses and even sneakier nature of "record label math" for how they calculate what's your earnings and what's theirs (so you essentially pay for your advance twice in a sense), I'd take the cash. And invest it. Maybe property. Hell, where I'm from, you can count on a return of 10% a year on real estate. :)

Original Latin Jazz

CD Baby

 

"I am not certain how original my contribution to music is as I am obviously an amateur." Patti Smith

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Originally posted by marino:

It won't happen, but if one can dream...

 

Steinway D

Nord G2

Electro 73

 

or maybe a Neuron... it's free, isn't it?! :D

I've already got 2 of the 4 things you mentioned :P

 

Me, I'd get something like Clusterchord posted:

- Grand Piano

- Eventide Orville

- Yamaha CS-80 (pristine, tuned and that)

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Originally posted by Jan Nemecek:

Me, I'd get something like Clusterchord posted:

- Grand Piano

- Eventide Orville

- Yamaha CS-80 (pristine, tuned and that)

Hey, the only man with Neuron that i know of, welcome to the forum, Jan.

 

btw, is that Orville plate on the "Dreaming2" music?, or its Neuron's internal Reverb (which, i've heard, isn't too bad itself)??

http://www.babic.com - music for film/theatre, audio-post
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Originally posted by clusterchord:

Originally posted by Jan Nemecek:

Me, I'd get something like Clusterchord posted:

- Grand Piano

- Eventide Orville

- Yamaha CS-80 (pristine, tuned and that)

Hey, the only man with Neuron that i know of, welcome to the forum, Jan.

 

btw, is that Orville plate on the "Dreaming2" music?, or its Neuron's internal Reverb (which, i've heard, isn't too bad itself)??

Yep, everything there is Neuron...I think Neuron's reverb is ok, didn't compare to other stuff though...
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- Yamaha CS-80 (pristine, tuned and that)
Jan, did you mean CP-80, the electric grand? Or really a CS-80? Well, I guess even the synths needed to be tuned. But as cool as the CS-80 was, we can do much better now.

 

I'd also go for a Yamaha C3-MP. Not that it's a better piano than a Steinway D3 -- as most serious classical players would scoff at that -- but it suits my style better. The MP is the MIDI piano -- MIDI in and out, but no disclavier. No point in paying $4K for a synthesizer I wouldn't pay $2K for. (I mean, ever heard anyone playing a Disclavier for ANY reason other than it's built into the damn piano and I want those other instruments?)

 

And, if I also get some roadies and a place to put it, a good ole B3 or A100 or equivalent (pedals unnecessary) and suitable Leslie, probably 122 if I have the model numbers right. (I want the smaller one with chorale.)

 

And since the Hammond/Leslie counts as a single item, I'll add a dedicated computer for Gigastudio and the like.

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Originally posted by learjeff:

- Yamaha CS-80 (pristine, tuned and that)
Jan, did you mean CP-80, the electric grand? Or really a CS-80? Well, I guess even the synths needed to be tuned. But as cool as the CS-80 was, we can do much better now.
Yes, CS-80...I recall reading (in Mark Vail's Vintage Synthesizers book) that CS-80 was a pain in the ass to tune (and it lost it every time it was moved)...
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Originally posted by learjeff:

I'd also go for a Yamaha C3-MP. Not that it's a better piano than a Steinway D3 -- as most serious classical players would scoff at that -- but it suits my style better.

I know some serious jazz players that prefer a Yamaha grand over the Steinway D and I take their opinions as seriously as those of classical pianists. I wouldn't take classical pianists scoffing at Yamaha very serious. I'd say they just think a grand needs to be German. Although Steinway might sound better for classical stuff, I think Yamaha is better for some jazz styles, including mine and apparently yours also. :)

 

Back to the dreamlists...

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Well, I know a girl (daughter of a co-worker) who by age 11 was winning national competitions against high schoolers, and recently (now 13 or 14) won a top national honor, and I've heard her recordings and except for lack of handspan I can't tell her playing from the very best. Plus she's a nice, unassuming kid. She says that the dynamics are different; the way the piano responds when you strike it at different speeds is just different, and though she grew up playing Yamahas she prefers the Steinways hands down. Also, for fast and intricate parts, the Steinway was "clearer". Believe me, this girl knows her fast, intricate parts. Maybe I'll post a short clip.

 

She didn't put it in quite those words; I don't recall how she said it. But I'd been reading about piano technique and how high velocitiy stikes cause the hammer staff to flex and how that relates to playing technique, and it seemed to me that this was one thing she was talking about. The "clearer" part is more of an overall tone thing. I love the bell-like quality of a Yamaha, and I also like the high sustain. But that very sustain I like for my style would be a disadvantage for certain kinds of intricate parts.

 

In any case, they're both great pianos. Frankly, if I had room, I'd love to have both!

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I very much like the way a Yamaha responds to the key, it really gives me something to work with. But I can imagine the response of a Steinway is better suited for classical stuff. I haven't any complaints about clearness in fast pieces on Yamaha's, but this girl probably plays faster than me, so I might very well be missing something. Oh well, they are both legends.
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