Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Anyone using acoustic guitar amps?


fisheye

Recommended Posts

In my never ending quest to get a nice piano sound, while still portable (there goes the real thing :( ), I'll be trying some acoustic guitar amps, like AER and Fishman.

 

Any experience with those kinds of amps?

What about bass amps?

 

Don't say I should buy a plastic active PA speakers. I don't like them just by the looks of them. :mad:

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 12
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Yes! I just bought an AER Compact 60. Blows my mind. I am using it instead of the MotionSound KP200S, at gigs where there is a PA, that's indoors and outside stages too. What do you want to know?

____________________________________
Rod

Here for the gear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great, at least someone who uses it!

 

Well, for one thing: does it sound good? How is the bass? I just need the bass to be good enough for a typical piano bass, I don't need boomy ground shaking things.

How loud is it? I want at least to go as loud as a real piano, possibly as loud as a grand. It should be able to compete with a jazz drummer (note: jazz drummer != rock drummer ;) ).

 

Though typical application would be my jazz trio (piano, bass, guitar) in small clubs.

 

How does it compare to your Motion Sound amp?

 

Can it handle other classic keyboard sounds like rhodes?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sound is very clear and present across the entire spectrum. It has enough bottom end for piano, even through the small speaker. You don't need bottom end for piano sound; you need clear low mids and up.

 

Volume is another question. I have used it with (miked) drums onstage, but I use it in a pre-out to the main board in that case (it has a built in balanced out). Nothing projects out there all on its own with a rock drummer who is miked! However, with a traditional jazz drummer it would sound fine in a small club.

 

I've used it with my Electro and the sound is clear and true across the entire spectrum for Rhodes & Hammond sounds.

 

It's got great effects, light in weight, very versitle for any application. I haven't missed the stereo sound at all, although there are people here who have bought two and are running them out in stereo.

 

Compared to the high fidelity sound of the AER, the Motion Sound is compressed, and sounds "ampy". The AER sounds like a real acoustic instrument, only louder.

 

Hope this helps. You better try one and see if it works for you, though! :)

____________________________________
Rod

Here for the gear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sound good! I'm certainly going to try them now!

 

In the local guitar shop they have it and also a Fishman loudbox, which I'm also going to try. The Fishman will have no problems with handling (unmiked) drummers, but it's 24 kg! So the AER is much preferable.

 

Now, if Yamaha just would come up with a 76 keys version of the P90...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I played my digital piano through an AER Compact 60 at a low volume jam session. The Compact 60 uses a single 8" speaker without a seperate tweeter. It sounded very clear when the acoustic guitar owner played it, its intended use, but not full range enough when I played my digital piano with it.

 

Its frequency range seems to favor mid range instruments. It has a mid-range "guitar voicing" which is also good for Rhodes and organs. But it sounded small and artificial to me when amplifying the acoustic piano sound. A full range two way or three way speaker, like the JBL EON15 G2, has a much wider and more suitabler frequency response. A good full range speaker system is more flattering for the piano sound, in my opinion.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Find 700 of Harry’s piano arrangements of standards for educational purposes and jazz piano tutorials at www.Patreon.com/HarryLikas

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your informed opinion, jazz+ ... :thu:

 

There you go fisheye! Try out the AER and anything else you're interested in... and please let jazz+ and me know what you think works best for your situation - you're the best judge.

____________________________________
Rod

Here for the gear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok. Tried some AER amps today: the Compact 60, the Compact Mobile, the Domino (sort of Compact twin: more power) and the AcoustiCube.

 

I used a self-made recording with Steinbergs The Grand (a sampled Kawai grand) to play through them. [i didn't take a keyboard with me, so I couldn't play for real.] On my hifi at home it sounded good and detailed, but too flat to be useful for live playing with real instruments.

 

With all AER amps I tried, I had no problems with the bass. Every low note was well defined and at the same time wouldn't overrule the bassplayer.

 

However, the Compact was a pain on the ears with high notes when pushing the volume a bit up. It was a bit boxy also. I heard an amp demo'ing a piano recording, instead of becoming an instrument by itself. The Domino had the same thing and sounded even boxier.

 

The Acousticube clearly overruled the others: the sound was much more alive. It was still a bit shrill, but this good be helped by adjusting the presence setting. However, the trying-to-be-a-piano thingy was still there, but much less than the others.

 

The Acousticube is very expensive though (about 1750 euros), so it should be really, really good before I'd by one.

 

I felt that even the Compact would be loud enough for jazz in small clubs with small groups.

 

Somewhere next week they will be having the AER cx8 there, which is the Acousticube without the preamp and effects section, just the main speaker-system. That one would be worthless as standalone for guitarists, but it might be something for keyboard players. It ís much more affordable than the Acousticube.

 

So I'll go back then and check it out. I'll also hook up my Speakeasy tube preamp, to see if it will add any magic. [i'd love to have a typical 60ies/70ies Steinway jazzrecording sound]

 

If I really like it in the shop, they'll let me try it for a week or so, so I can take it on a rehearsal of my jazz trio; that's the real test.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the best rig you could get together for not too many bucks is one or two Acme Low B2 bass cabinets (or Low B1, to be really small) and a Pyramid 1000 or 1800 power amp. We've been using these for years now, inexpensive, not too heavy or big, and you really get plenty of power over the entire range of the instrument. If you search you will find some posts on this combo on this forum from years past.

A WOP BOP A LU BOP, A LOP BAM BOOM!

 

"There is nothing I regret so much as my good behavior. What demon possessed me that I behaved so well?" -Henry David Thoreau

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by fisheye:

take it on a rehearsal of my jazz trio; that's the real test.

That is the real test, for sure. See if you can grab one of those other amps for an A-B at a rehearsal. I've found the 60 cuts through pretty nicely in a lower volume trio situation, and when you DI it out, it makes a good stage monitor that you can place real close.

 

Good luck! Very good reviews, by the way. :thu:

____________________________________
Rod

Here for the gear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Ted Nightshade:

I think the best rig you could get together for not too many bucks is one or two Acme Low B2 bass cabinets (or Low B1, to be really small) and a Pyramid 1000 or 1800 power amp.

Ah! I'd like some tried and tested system, but this Acme company doesn't seem to have dealers in the Netherlands. Stuff seen here is usually the more popular American stuff (Mackie, JBL) and the better places might have some German products like Doepfer masterkeyboards and AER amps.

And Behringer all over the place, of course...

 

I'd like to have something I can carry with one hand and I'm not that strong, so ideally <20kg. Older tried and tested stuff is often heavier than that, unfortunately. Just like real Hammonds, real Rhodes and real grands. New stuff nowadays gets smaller and smaller, but not always better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...