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OT cooking, omelet pan - question


Dave Horne

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OK, I have a split type omelet pan. Is this meant to make two omelets at the same time, or is this for flipping one omelet from one tray to the other. I ask because I tried the latter, and it didn't go as I had expected.

 

Any cooking pros here? Thanks, Dave Horne

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by Dave Horne:

OK, I have a split type omelet pan. Is this meant to make two omelets at the same time, or is this for flipping one omelet from one tray to the other. I ask because I tried the latter, and it didn't go as I had expected.

 

Any cooking pros here? Thanks, Dave Horne

You mean the p250 doesn't cook omelettes? I'm sure the P120 does... :thu:
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Originally posted by orangefunk:

Originally posted by Dave Horne:

OK, I have a split type omelet pan. Is this meant to make two omelets at the same time, or is this for flipping one omelet from one tray to the other. I ask because I tried the latter, and it didn't go as I had expected.

 

Any cooking pros here? Thanks, Dave Horne

You mean the p250 doesn't cook omelettes? I'm sure the P120 does... :thu:
I have the P250 set up to make my coffee and I know the P120 can not do that ... Mike Martin confirmed that in a previous thread.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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If it's the kind that is hinged in the middle, you're supposed to cook half of the omelet in each side, put the filling in one side and flip the other side on top to finish. It seems like a good idea, but as you have found, it really doesn't work as advertised.

 

I suppose with some practice, you could get pretty good with the thing, but the same is true of a regular saute or omelet pan. Assuming you are reasonably good with your hands (not too much of a stretch on a keyboard forum), with a decent non-stick omelet pan and a bit of practice you'll be fine. Folding or rolling up an omelet is really easier than using that type of pan you described.

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

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Jayhawk, thanks for the info! I usually make an omelet for Sunday morning breakfast. I'll try it once again.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by shniggens:

WTF?!?!?

-Whirred!

 

S'what I was thinkin' too ...

 

Hey Dave, you know you can use a microwave to cook omelets, right? Tupperware. Don't have to worry about flippin' 'em either ... :D

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Timing is everything in music, making love, and cooking. Make sure your omlette pan has a built-in clock. :)

 

Seriously, I'm a better cook than piano player. Toss that hinged pan. They are way too thin and don't heat evenly. Go find a heavy, commercial grade pan. (Do you have something like Costco in the Netherlands?) A good pan lets you saute all the onions, peppers, etc. that go into the omlette and is very general purpose in the kitchen.

 

Bon Appetite.

Casio PX-5S, Korg Kronos 61, Omnisphere 2, Ableton Live, LaunchKey 25, 2M cables
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I hate eggs. Maybe that's too strong. I just don't like 'em much. Never understand that traditional breakfast: eggs, sausage, bacon, pancakes, etc, etc. My stomach can't take all that greasy, fatty stuff in the morning.

 

I'll have a toasted begal and some fruit.

 

Busch.

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Hmm, that's intersting. I crave that stuff in the morning! Keep the heat low in the non stick pan with lid, make sure you don't flip too soon. May take longer if you add sausage, onions, peppers etc. to eggs prior to cooking. Yummm :)

Lyrics. Wasted space between solos.

I can't tell you, but I can play it for you.

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[/qb]I have the P250 set up to make my coffee and I know the P120 can not do that ... Mike Martin confirmed that in a previous thread.[/QB]I don't care what Mike said. He's just a company dude. The P120 not only makes coffee; it makes cappucino, and does so while simultaneously toasting a croissant. Oh did I forget to mention that it grinds the beans? I personally have tested these 2 instruments side by side and I can tell you that the P250 doesn't come close to covering all the bases that the P120 does.
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Stop it! I´m getting bad GAS for an omelette, I haven´t had anything to eat today... My Pro-3t is great for foaming milk, and my Rhodes is always cookin´! ;)

 

Seriously, I noticed the other day that my Mac G4 has some sort of cup holder that comes right out of the front panel. I wonder if it can make me a frappucino... :freak:

 

/J :P nas

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Originally posted by burningbusch:

I hate eggs. Maybe that's too strong. I just don't like 'em much. Never understand that traditional breakfast: eggs, sausage, bacon, pancakes, etc, etc. My stomach can't take all that greasy, fatty stuff in the morning.

 

Busch.

No fetus no eatus?
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Personally, I don't flip my omlettes. I like mine fluffy and not flat. I learned this technique from a chef. First, choose a pan that you are only going to use for omlettes. Should be nonstick variety with a heat resistant handle. Then when making your omlette, use your broiler to cook the top. I move my oven shelf all the way to the top, then turn on the broiler. The heat cooking from the top actually pulls the omlette away from the pan virtually guaranteeing easy removal and a perfect omlette every time.

 

I don't close the omlette until it's transferred to the plate where with just a tilt of the pan, you have a beautiful, fluffy and incredibly tasty omlette....

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Originally posted by Rick K.:

Personally, I don't flip my omlettes. I like mine fluffy and not flat. I learned this technique from a chef. First, choose a pan that you are only going to use for omlettes. Should be nonstick variety with a heat resistant handle. Then when making your omlette, use your broiler to cook the top. I move my oven shelf all the way to the top, then turn on the broiler. The heat cooking from the top actually pulls the omlette away from the pan virtually guaranteeing easy removal and a perfect omlette every time.

 

I don't close the omlette until it's transferred to the plate where with just a tilt of the pan, you have a beautiful, fluffy and incredibly tasty omlette....

Rick, that's pretty much how I make 'em but I have a couple of variations from your recipie.

 

I fry up the onions/tomatos/ham/whatever first, then pour in the beaten egg (or egg with a bit of milk), then, when it starts to bubble, transfer the whole pan to the broiler. To make it extra tasty, I grate some cheese (vintage white cheddar is my fave) onto the top of the omlette before I grill it ....Mmmmmmm! :):love:

 

When it's grilled nicely - all fluffy with melted cheese on top - I transfer it flat to a plate to eat. I don't fold it over at all. It kinda looks like a pizza at this point, so I nicknamed my variation "pizza omlette".

 

:DTR

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Dave,

 

MurMan has it: throw away that hinged pan. Friends don't let friends cook with gimmick equipment.

 

Get thee to a restaurant supply store. Get a professional nonstick pan, 8"-10" (sorry, you'll have to do the metric conversion). You want a pan where the sides gently slope to meet the bottom.

 

Use 1 tablespoon of water per large egg for an omlette. Never milk. Water will create steam which makes a fluffy omlette. Milk is great for scrambled eggs (which also uses a different cooking technique than omlette making).

 

Here's the best way to flip an omlette. Put your omlette fillings on the half of the omlette away from the handle. When the eggs are cooked, grab the pan handle underhanded (knuckles facing down, your pinky should be closest to the pan itself). Slide the filling side of the omlette out of the pan and onto the plate. When that half of the omlette is on the plate, raise the pan above the plate as you continue to slide the rest of the eggs out and flip the second half over the filled half.

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Originally posted by Dave the Rave:

... When it's grilled nicely - all fluffy with melted cheese on top - I transfer it flat to a plate to eat. I don't fold it over at all. It kinda looks like a pizza at this point, so I nicknamed my variation "pizza omlette".

 

:DTR

That is where I was leading with my taco/tostada comment. Things got a lot easier when I stopped worrying about folding it in the pan. Now I just slide it onto the plate and eat omlets open-faced.

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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Originally posted by Rick K.:

Personally, I don't flip my omlettes. I like mine fluffy and not flat. I learned this technique from a chef. First, choose a pan that you are only going to use for omlettes. Should be nonstick variety with a heat resistant handle. Then when making your omlette, use your broiler to cook the top. I move my oven shelf all the way to the top, then turn on the broiler. The heat cooking from the top actually pulls the omlette away from the pan virtually guaranteeing easy removal and a perfect omlette every time.

 

I don't close the omlette until it's transferred to the plate where with just a tilt of the pan, you have a beautiful, fluffy and incredibly tasty omlette....

What you are describing is called a frittata in Italian cooking. Usually they have parmesan cheese and often vegetables (artichokes, asparagus, tomatoes, etc.) and/or meat in them. In most Italian cookbooks, they are with the second courses, i.e. not strictly a breakfast item.

 

This thread is making me hungry.

 

I have to agree. This is probably thre most OT thread I have ever seen.

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

Nord Electro 5D 73

Yamaha P105

Kurzweil PC3LE7

Motion Sound KP200S

Schimmel 6-10LE

QSC CP-12

Westone AM Pro 30 IEMs

Rolls PM55P

 

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Originally posted by Jayhawk:

What you are describing is called a frittata in Italian cooking. Usually they have parmesan cheese and often vegetables (artichokes, asparagus, tomatoes, etc.) and/or meat in them. In most Italian cookbooks, they are with the second courses, i.e. not strictly a breakfast item.

Exactly.. and don't forget the parsley, plus maybe a bit of basil. Add the parmisan after one minute of cooking. Artichokes, string beans, asparagus, yes - tomatoes, no. And hey, just one vegetable at a time! You don't mix them.

This thread is making me hungry.

Me too... I cooked myself a frittata just yesterday! (Great when you're in a hurry)

I have to agree. This is probably thre most OT thread I have ever seen.

Absolutely. The attempts to say something musical in this thread have been pathetic till now. :P It's a lot of fun anyway. :D

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nonstick pans are for the weak! :D

 

plus, that coating (Teflon, etc.) will give you tumors, lads! :freak:

 

go with a cast-iron pan...even heating, goes in the oven and broiler safely, and hey, you even get dietary iron from it! :)

 

cheers,

aeon

Go tell someone you love that you love them.
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I didn't think anyone would mind an off topic (really off topic) post on a Sunday - a slow post day. I really only make omelets about once per week and my wife bought me that omelet pan for my birthday a few weeks ago. It has never worked correctly so I figure the problem is with me. I have since learned more as a result of this thread. I'll give it another chance before I switch to another pan.

 

Even more off topic, I came back from the doctor today and learned the results of my blood work up; I'm 54. I try to go once a year to the doctor for a basic check up and since we pay so much for health insurance, I try to get my money's worth and ask for as many tests as he thinks I should order.

 

My cholesterol reading (as long as we're talking about eggs) is 4.6 MMOL/L. Anything under 5.0 is very good. With the US system that comes to about 178.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Dave, 178 is outstanding. You are either blessed with naturally low cholesterol, or are a model of self discipline for a heart-healthy diet and regular exercise program. I'm 52, and it's challenging for me to stay below 200mg. The only method that has worked for me is 100+ miles a week on my road bicycle, moderate weightlifting and an athlete's diet. If I slack off, my cholesterol skyrockets to 250+.
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