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Please share your story or on learning playing keyboard


STR41N

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I could give you some tips that may or may not be useful, since I'm not sure what your goals are. Ask yourself: What style of music do you want to play (rock/pop/jazz/classical/etc.)? Do you plan to play in a band or strictly solo performances? How much TIME do you have available to practice daily, weekly? Can you read music? Can you sight-read?

 

If you want to develop speed and accuracy, play scales, such as those by Hanon or Czerny. These are the classic works, available at most every music store or online. Plan on playing scales at least an hour a day (and preferably more) to begin with, if you're serious about getting good in the long run. If you have limited time, or aren't serious about progressing, do 1/2 hour a day.

 

After scales, play something you enjoy hearing. It should be sufficiently challenging, yet not impossible. And because you like it, you will remain motivated even when the going gets tough (and it will ;) ).

 

The best advice - consider studying with a qualified teacher who can help you to develop proper technique. This is much better than trying to figure it out on your own, then having to unlearn all the bad habits you developed over time.

 

BTW - what keyboard are you currently playing?

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HEY THERE! WELCOME!!!

 

i don't know if this will help you out:

 

i play keyboard since i'm 5 but then i stop having classes because i didn't have time...

 

today, i'm not as well as i would be if i haven't stop [sorry about my bad english]! i practice [?] keyboards everyday, about between 4 and 6 hours, every single day, don't metter if the world is going down, i'm here playing [just like RIGHT NOW!!!]...

here in Brazil it's almost 2 am. and i'm playing!

i know how to play, but i don't know how to make weard sounds, SYNTH MAGICs and so...

i think that the only way for you to learn anything you want is really wishing that [whishing?! i don't know about it, but i'm trying!]...

Prog Metal from Brazil... KEEP PROGGIN'

OMEGA ZERO Keyboard player.

http://www.omegazero.cjb.net/

 

Alesis QS8

Yamaha PSR530

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I took lessons for about 10 years (started on the accordion). Stopped the lessons around 18 years old. Got in a band at 16 years old and continued playing in a band until I was 42. The band was the best thing that could happen to me as far as playing. Because I liked our music style, I practiced a lot. Now, since I have a family and kids, I just play for myself (have a small home studio). I practice at least one hour a day but very often 2 to 3 hours. Usually at night.
Yamis
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I started taking lessons when I was 5, but I wasn't interested so it didn't last. When I was about 15 someone showed me a couple of things on the piano and I was facinated. A light bulb went off. So I started learning songs on the piano (Let It Be, Color My World, etc), but I realized that I was missing some technique. So I took piano lessons from age 16 thru age 19. Since then I've picked up things along the way.
David
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My mom was a piano teacher, so there was no escape for me! :)

 

I studied classical piano from the time I was 4 until I was 15, after which I quit. I also studied pipe organ in my first stint in college for a couple of years, which I loved.

 

I started playing in bands when I was 14 and played professionally straight through until I was 44. I had a 6 year haitus and now I'm starting up again at age 50. Man, does it hurt to shlep equipment now! :D

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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Originally posted by STR41N:

Hi. I'm a beginner and will very apreciate any sharing about learning keyboard. And I'd like to know about your practice routine, how long, what do you practice. Thanks.

Experiment. Play because you love it. Play music you enjoy. Learn your scales and learn the fundamentals, but also play music that you enjoy, not just music that is foisted upon you. Set up a schedule if you are one who responds well to schedules. Write your own stuff. Keep it fresh. Keep it fun.

 

I have approximately ten years of classical piano training, although I am self-taught on guitar (I could definitely benefit from some guitar lessons, but so far am doing pretty well in playing with my band).

 

My practice routine when I was learning classical piano was to practice for one hour in the morning, and then another hour (sometimes an hour and a half) after school. I was a typical kid, sometimes rather undisciplined, and wanted to be outside playing basketball instead of indoors practicing. But as long as I was getting the appropriate amount of practice in, this made my parents happy, and I still got some basketball time in. I later made the school basketball team, so all that playing was not just merely frivolous (not that there's something wrong with frivolity).

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I typically practice three hours a day (as measured by a stop watch, after the three hours it's time for a glass of wine).

 

The initial 50 minutes are what I call pure technique. What I do varies from week to week for those initial 50 minutes. I might practice melodic patterns, one note each hand in every key ... or various technical patterns and again, everything in every key. If I practice arpeggios, I really only practice what I would actually use in playing. I rarely play a simple triad when playing arpeggios, so I don't practice them anymore.

 

After those first 50 minutes, it's my choice. I might work on a tune to come up with an arrangement or I might just practice a tune I know but play it in a different key or two. I might bring out some old sheet music and just practice sight reading. Everyday is different.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by STR41N:

Hi. I'm a beginner and will very apreciate any sharing about learning keyboard. And I'd like to know about your practice routine, how long, what do you practice. Thanks.

Work on your ears! If possible learn to improvise by playing with others. Being able to play in a band is cool and it improves your solo playing too because it puts the music first, ahead of purely technical issues.
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If we're talking about instrumental practice only (as opposed to composing, arranging, programming, recording), It depends on how much time I have.

If I have three hours (quite rare these days), I usually do one hour of tecnique, one hour or more of work on pieces, maybe another little bit of tecnique, and perhaps some improvisation at the end. More realistically, I'll have two hours or so - then I'll do 45-50 minutes of tecnique and devote all the rest to working on music.

 

But all this is a bit theoric. If I have to learn a difficult piece, for example, sometimes I just do a 10-15 minute warmup, then I go head first into reading the material. Of course, by working on difficult passages, you *are* doing technique. :) Other times, an idea for a new tune arises just by playing something, so I have to consider if it's the case to stop all other activities and just develop that.

 

But usually, I try to be as disciplined as I can, although I hate it. The reason is simple: Time is limited, you have commitments, so you have to find the delicate balance between doing what you feel and doing what you need. An example: I hate to leave tunes unfinished - even if I end up not using a tune for anything. So I make an effort to finish them anyway, even if I would prefer to work on something else at that moment. Knowing myself well enough, I know that if I have some kind of complete piece, I'll be much more inclined to look at it again later and use it for something, rather than if I only have a fragment.

 

Back to practice: I have a technique routine of one hour and an half, but rarely I get to do the complete cycle, so I have a series of 'B plans': The 30-minute routine, the 45-minute, the one-hour. The next time, I'll try to make up for the exercises which I had left out. I find very important not to neglect any particular branch of technique for a long time (let's say, arpeggios).

 

About books - Beringer, Cortot and others are very useful - but I find that old Hanon can be excellent if you transpose the first 20 or 30 exercises in all keys - major, minor (harmonic and melodic), plus several different others like the Hungarian or double-harmonic (C, D, Eb, F#, G, Ab, B, C) or the so-called "Harmonic Major" (C, D, E, F, G, Ab, B, C). I also found that Hanon works best with seven-note scales; you can try it with diminished, whole-tone, and augmented scales as well, for example, but you're going to have headaches on certain exercises (how do you play a sixth or a seventh in those scales?).

Rhythmic, dynamic, and articulation variants are also, of course, very useful.

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Thanks for the reply. You all practice a lot.

 

I could give you some tips that may or may not be useful, since I'm not sure what your goals are. Ask yourself: What style of music do you want to play (rock/pop/jazz/classical/etc.)? Do you plan to play in a band or strictly solo performances? How much TIME do you have available to practice daily, weekly? Can you read music? Can you sight-read?

 

I can read music but it is slow. My goal is to be play in a band and have a good ear so I can play song just from hearing it several time, and I want I can play what I hear in my head (is it improvise ?), and I can do solo performance on piano. I want to play rock, pop, and jazz. Hehehe . Maybe my goal is difficult to achieve but I will try. Now I only practice about a hour and half everyday.

My gear is piano and yamaha psr 2000 .By the way, I don't like my psr 2000. The key is too light.

Thanks. Please give any advice , or your story.

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My mom is a mostly self-taught Southern gospel pianist. She started teaching me the basics of how to find notes and make simple triads when I was three. I dinked around on a piano a lot (and a ukelele too), but it wasn't serious or anything.

 

When I was around seven my parents were given an old piano. It need $100 worth of tuning and work, which was a Big Deal on the kind of money we had. I started taking lessons at that point, but my lessons were always sort of stop and go -- sometimes we didn't have the money. I had lessons on and off, mostly off I guess, until my late teens.

 

I also learned the trumpet in public school bands starting in the 4th grade (that's US grades, I guess I was nine years old). I learned alot about reading music and suchlike that way. It's really a shame that this option is unavailable to so many school kids now. I had excellent music teachers who loved music, knew a lot, and had teaching skills in addition to the musical skills.

 

In my teens I started playing organ in church. Loved that. It was especially cool because my mom was on piano. Since I was a rebellious little punk, it was basically the only time my mom and I had positive interactions at that point in my life. :D:rolleyes:

 

I also discovered that keys could be played in rock around that time, and joined a band.

 

I took an 11-year hiatus from playing when I was 25. Since I've gotten back into playing again, I've found it extremely difficult to develop the discipline to practice scales and such. So I basically just work on songs.

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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Originally posted by Phait:

I don't practice, I just play. Have intentions of learning notation someday.

What would it take for you to learn how to read?

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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I only took lessons for a couple of years as a kid. Fortunately, my teacher really stressed the basics - chords and scales. It stuck with me.

 

When I was 15, loafing around the house for the summer, my mom sent me up to the local music store - "...you will accomplish SOMETHING this summer!" - good old Mom. Anyhow, took organ lessons for six months - learned some improv, chord extensions, paradiddles, teacher transcribed some solos & lead lines for me - then he cut me loose, cos I didn't want to learn to play pedals or read better.

 

What I knew then was enough to get me into garage bands. I had always had a decent ear. Got to the point where I could turn out a reasonably accurate chord chart on any pop or rock tune, but didn't get serious about it til I got to college. A few theory classes, and a year of jazz improv, and I was off and running.

 

Now that I'm in my late 40s, I'm taking lessons again, pipe organ this time. It is going VERY slowly, because I still don't like practicing. My bad. But I'm finally kicking bass (have a Sunday morning Gospel choir gig - A-100, TWO Leslies!!!), and working my way through the basic classical church repertoire as well - just finishing up Franck's "Panis Angelicus", starting on Clarke's "Trumpet Voluntary" (which I've faked for years) now.

 

I'm really impressed with the discipline of some of the guys in their responses. I'd be a MUCH better keyboardist if I'd practiced like that for the 40 years I've been playing. But my attention span's always been short, and now my back's not up to hours at the organ bench either.

 

Good luck,

 

Daf

I played in an 8 piece horn band. We would often get bored. So...three words:

"Tower of Polka." - Calumet

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Originally posted by STR41N:

Thanks for the reply. You all practice a lot.

 

I can read music but it is slow. My goal is to be play in a band and have a good ear so I can play song just from hearing it several time, and I want I can play what I hear in my head (is it improvise ?), and I can do solo performance on piano. I want to play rock, pop, and jazz. Hehehe . Maybe my goal is difficult to achieve but I will try. Now I only practice about a hour and half everyday.

My gear is piano and yamaha psr 2000 .By the way, I don't like my psr 2000. The key is too light.

Thanks. Please give any advice , or your story.

Having a good ear is a blessing. But don't use it as a substitute for reading music, otherwise it's a curse. Learn to read well, and use your ear to help you hear things inside your head. Reading will enable you to play lots of tunes, and your ear will allow you to realize your most creative thoughts, like improvising, changing chord and rhythm structures, etc.

 

I started playing piano when I was 8, and am classically trained. As a kid I practiced only about 2 hours a day, preferring to play sports outdoors like everyone else. But one day I watched my neighbor rehearse with his rock band. That was the first time I'd ever seen electric guitars, drums, and organ up close. It was the coolest! I was determined to become good enough to play in a band, yet wanted to retain my classical roots. So I got a new piano teacher who taught me to improve my technique, and also introduced me to theory - scales, chords, etc. She was also a talented jazz pianist (and a closet rock 'n' roll fan).

 

As a college student I played 6 to 8 hours a day (sometimes more) of classical literature like Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, et al. At the same time, I was fascinated with jazz greats like Oscar Peterson, Bill Evans, and McCoy Tyner, and still liked playing rock (I was heavily influenced by fusion groups like Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Yes, and others).

 

But that's history. Today, the responsibilities of a wife and kids, plus a demanding career, rarely allow me more than 2 hours (and often less!) a day to keep up my chops and learn new tunes. So my advice to you is to pick what you like and keep on playing it until it sounds GOOD.

 

Playing the same ten measures 100 times until you get it right is better than playing the whole tune with lots of mistakes. That's the mark of an amateur, and you want to get beyond that. Never sacrifice speed for accuracy - your audience will hear every wrong note, and it just kinda takes the fun out of it. Pick one tune and play it until you get it down solid. Add some scales for your technique. And always use your ear to hear things that aren't on the chart!

 

Recommending what keyboard is "best" for you is impossible, since you're the one who will be playing it, not me. I'm a big Yamaha fan, and love my S90 weighted keyboard. There are others on this forum who will have good things to say about their Yamaha P120 and P250. Also check out Roland, Kurzweil, Korg, etc. Decide if you like the feel of a weighted or semi-weighted keyboard.

 

You need to spend some serious time asking around and PLAYING these boards until you find the one you like. There are lots of good choices, and lots of good advice to be had from the many talented and helpful folks on this forum. :D:thu:

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Thanks all. hm.. every people in this board a different approach on learning keyboard I think. ;)

 

By the way I think it would be good to tell my background. I began to study music, electone when I was about 10. But it only for four month I think. I did't like it at that time. But when I'm 13 , I liked to hear classic piano pieces and I start to begin my classical piano course. It is on Yamaha music eduation's subsidiary. At that time I don't interested on rock band. I practiced about 1 to 2 hours a day in my senior high school. (age 15) At this time I prefer rock, pop, jazz song in my listening than classic.At 2002 I tried to study David Burge Perfect PItch Super Course, but I gived up after 6 months.

Then at age 17, about September 2003, I began to playing my church band. The song is rock and pop. I get into it because they need a keyboard player and my father told me to. It is very hard at first. I have to play in different key. I had to play without a musical notation, like I used to be. they all only used their ear to play. And no other keyboard player to teach me. I had to play in different keys according to the singer. But I don't master the keyboard well. I don't know how to accompany in this style and that style. (rock, foxtrot, pop) So I just use piano or string and play a full chord. hehe I did many mistake, but we always use low volume on keyboard (because I am bad on playing) so maybe people don't aware of the mistake.

Now, because playing with that band, I'm very interested on playing on pop, jazz, and rock band, on contemporary keyboard. I'm interested on playing keyboard more than before I played only classical piano.

 

So I try to learn relative pitch by searching the chord progression by ear. It has somewhat improved. Some day I see some one playing a solo performance keyboard with psr-740, wow, it is very beautiful, he modify the song to his taste, and I like his taste of music. He add some modern jazz on pop song. He doesn't need time to find the chord. So, his ear must be very good. I want my ear can be like him.

 

2 month ago I buy Pop Piano book and I use it to know how to accompany on some style. I like it, but until now I only just on chord. NOw the spontaneous to play chord is improved.

 

Now ,I am aware that my teacher isn't good, she didn't teach the fundamental well. She have been a nice teacher. My tecnique is somewhat bad. My ear doesn't develop. My reading is slow but my teacher doesn't help me to improve it. I don't master the keyboard.

In classical piano I am not good . A month ago I have quit.

 

A long story , isnt it?. hehehe. Hope you know how my position and background.

By the way how to balance the need to practice and dicipline and our other life such social life and education life. Now I almost graduate from High School.

 

I think I need to develop a good sight reading, a good ear, and a good tecnique. Play some tunes I like from book or from transcribing some song.

But , I think to simpilify all the things, maybe I just get a good teacher and do what he/she tell. But in my city it is hard to find it, it is a city in a developing country. So until now I want to try the best in learning by myself.

 

Thanks

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