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Just another reason the music industry SUCKS.


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Found this on another website (Linked Below) October 29, 2002 P&G Targets Teens With Viral Campaign By Brian Morrissey In an attempt to cash in on the lucrative teen demographic, consumer packaged goods giant Proctor & Gamble (Quote, Company Info) has launched a new marketing unit to find trend-setting teens that help form product opinions in their peer groups. The new unit, called Tremor, aims to gather a group of 200,000 teens identified by P&G as "connectors" -- those who are influential in forming teen opinions about products. The Tremor members will be solicited about twice a month for feedback on products, from both P&G and partners, in exchange for a sneak peak at new products and chances to win prizes like gift certificates. The teens would then be asked to spread the word to their friends. P&G said Tremor membership would be exclusive -- just one in ten teens qualify -- based on a set of characteristics the company has identified as shared among opinion-making teens. These traits include their social networks and propensity to share information about products with friends. The teen demographic is a large and lucrative market for advertisers, boasting disposable income and unformed opinions on brands. According to research compiled by 360 Youth, the marketing unit of teen media company Alloy, the 12-17 demographic is 24.3 million strong, spending $120 billion a year. Samantha Skey, vice president of convergent marketing at 360 Youth, said reaching teens with viral campaigns could pay big dividends. "It's very cost efficient if done properly," said Skey. "If done improperly, you're immediately identified as a poseur." Tremor, which P&G developed internally, will market P&G brands Cover Girl cosmetics and Old Spice deodorant, said Gretchen Muchnick, a P&G spokesperson. The campaign will use a variety of marketing media, including e-mail and direct mailings. The e-mail aspect of the campaign will aim to capitalize on the so-called viral marketing effect, in which individuals pass along product information to friends and family. While marketers have long sought word-of-mouth buzz, the relative ease of communicating -- and tracking communication -- on the Internet has sparked a new emphasis on the strategy. Muchnick declined to specify how Tremor identified influential teens for the campaign. She said the network would launch by the end of the year, and the company had nearly compiled its 200,000 names for the database. Last week, P&G shook up its online media buying approach, dispersing it from the corporate level to the brand level, in an attempt to integrate its interactive advertising more closely with its offline efforts. http://www.internetnews.com/IAR/article.php/1490041

http://www.kennyruyter.com/old/cowmix.mp3 <- Cowbell fever REMIX oh damn!!!

 

http://www.eastcoastbands.com

 

aka: ECBRules . thisOLDdude . keny . Scooch

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Oh great...now I'm a poseur for not buying their shit? Gimme a break! It's a good thing that I don't fit into their demographic ideal. Is the economy so bad that advertisers have to resort to invasive adverts such as this? I have enough trouble keeping spam off my e-mail, and the junk mail I sort through these days from snail mail, not to mention the telemarketers (I don't hate 'em as people, it's their job, but I do feel bad for all the bullshit they have to put up with though)... AARRGGHH...goddamn mailing lists! :mad: :freak:
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[quote]Originally posted by thisOLDdude: [b]The new unit, called Tremor, aims to gather a group of 200,000 teens identified by P&G as "connectors" -- those who are influential in forming teen opinions about products.[/b][/quote]this will not work kids who are what they are wanting will not want to bother with such a thing and like qed you can not observe without distorting the observed
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There was a Frontline show on PBS over the weekend called "The Marketing of Cool". It was all about this kind of marketing and how in cahoots MTV, the Labels and the Corporations are. This isn't just about music, it's about everything. Good Post. :thu:

Jotown:)

 

"It's all good: Except when it's Great"

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In fact, these guys are slow getting on the boat-the makers of Game Cube and other such devices have been doing this for several years. They get a group of teens together under the pretext of trying out a new product, but what they`re really doing is identifying the kids that other kids will listen to. They then give these individuals a unit which they can take home, and once the other kids see it...well, you can figure it out. But it`s the companies, not the consumers, that take the risk of being exposed as shamsters. If the new device bombs, the `cool kids` may turn state`s evidence on the company. Then someone has to supply the kid with a new identity-and a cooler game-in return for their testimony...it all gets very messy.
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I'll tell you how this relates to the music industry. What do kids buy? CD's, Skateboards, and Band T-shirts. Video Games and toys. Their parents pay for everything else. Another thing I'd like to mention is that they are targeting people involved in message boards from popular bands. I recently had two people tell me how they were seeking out people through the Wakefield Message Board. (Wakefield is another one of those good charolette like boy bands) Their target market is the people already stupified into the corporate kid model. The worse thing is that the kids involved don't have a clue as to what they are doing. You could hit them with a brick and they'd still give all the info in the world to these people in hopes of getting cool stuff. It is cool to them that they have an 'in' on the next big thing, but what the problem here is that it gurantees that the next big thing comes via this company. And this cuts smaller independant people who have products like music out of the picture because they have already infiltrated the market with a definition of whats "hip". The bastards. if Proctor and Gamble is able to control what the kid market buys, what are the likely chances the same kids would ever look at smaller independant companies and bands? Even If this is not directly related to the music industry it identifies an age old scheme in large corporations, the scheme is all about control. Who do you think gives P&G products to market? Small business? No I don't think so. Big Record companies are a perfect match, because they can afford to get P&G to market their junk for them. It's just another example of how there are really no small fish allowed in the big fish only pond.

http://www.kennyruyter.com/old/cowmix.mp3 <- Cowbell fever REMIX oh damn!!!

 

http://www.eastcoastbands.com

 

aka: ECBRules . thisOLDdude . keny . Scooch

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[quote] Their target market is the people already stupified into the corporate kid model. The worse thing is that the kids involved don't have a clue as to what they are doing. You could hit them with a brick and they'd still give all the info in the world to these people in hopes of getting cool stuff. [/quote](dumb) kids will be (dumb) kids. Screw 'em. Old Spice?! They're tryiing to market Old Spice!! ha. What are they thinking, Bif Studster, 17, is gonna get mailed a complimentary Old Spice Fresh Forest Scent Deoderant Stick... and he's gonna tell all his football buddies while they're getting wasted, "Yo, this Old Spice, it's some dope shit!" Viral marketing (when done right) is some crazy evil stuff, really fascinating. Google it up.
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