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Are you good at fixing broken headphones when


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there seems to be nothing wrong with the connections?

 

I'm trying to fix a pair of sennheizer HD 212 pros that just stopped working.

I opened them up and everything is soldered fine and looks like it should work.

Each headphone has its own input jack, so inside the jack, there's a small chip with connections that runs connections to the actual speaker.

If i plug the wire into the jack and twist it around, I can get some sound, so I know they are working. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to fix them?

I fixed another cheap pair of phones that wasn't working but was soldered correctly and looked like it it should work by adding solder to the already soldered connections :freak:

Since the connections are very small and I don't want to melt away any important electronical things inside the sennheizers, I'm going to use the re-soldering as a last resort.

Thanks :)

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If your old headphones appeared to be soldered correctly, what really happened is that the wires stressed and broke over time from bending (it happens eventually), and it only appeared that you had a connection. By filling that gap with solder, you restored the connection, but it's physically less solid than a wire would be, so it's going to have a limited lifespan. Chips are very sensitive to heat, so you're asking for trouble if you solder close to them: what you need to use is solder that melts very quickly with a low heat applied to it, and a low-power soldering iron. And maybe practice on something you don't care about.
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Originally posted by dementia13:

If your old headphones appeared to be soldered correctly, what really happened is that the wires stressed and broke over time from bending (it happens eventually), and it only appeared that you had a connection. By filling that gap with solder, you restored the connection, but it's physically less solid than a wire would be, so it's going to have a limited lifespan. Chips are very sensitive to heat, so you're asking for trouble if you solder close to them: what you need to use is solder that melts very quickly with a low heat applied to it, and a low-power soldering iron. And maybe practice on something you don't care about.

I second this. Maybe even better is to take it to the proffesional electronics guy and save yourself some hands tramors while doing it on your own (talking from my amateur repair guy point of view :D )
Fat But Fast
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