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Choosing Sampler: VP9000, S760 or VX5080


b3keys

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Hi,

I am interested in getting a sampler or a sample playback machine and am thinking about the Roland products listed above.

 

Can anyone provide me with the key differences of each, advantages/disadvantages.

 

I primarily want to use the module for sample playback.

 

Or would i be better off with a Kurzweil K2661 with its capabilities. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Of the three, I'd recommend the 5080.

 

The 760 is way cool, but it's starting to show its age. Still if you can get one REALLY cheap, and you can get all the options for it (video out, mouse, etc), it's not a bad choice if you only use sounds that are less than 32mb.

 

The VP9000 is not a sampler in the regular sense. Unless you are into sonic mangling, this isn't the box for you. It's not really the best thing to play piano samples, etc.

 

The 5080 is a monster...I'm waiting for it to slip under 1000 before picking one up...it's at 1099 at my local GC. Hurry up, Fantom XR!!!

"For instance" is not proof.

 

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Originally posted by b3keys:

Rabid,

Thanks for the reply. I am interested in the Fantom XR, however, I've learned that it will only play WAV files and nothing in the Roland S or AKAI format.

There will be conversion software provided by Roland for the Fantom-X that will allegedly convert them, if that does it for ya'
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I can say the XV-5080 is very handy becasue you don't have to use it as a sampler. I bought mine when it first came out. Now I cringe when I see the current price. But, if the price drops some more ....

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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Originally posted by Jan Folkson:

... You can take my 760s from my cold dead hands.

I notice a lot of professionals still hold on to theirs. They do have a good sound that is hard to match.

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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If you don't need sampling, the 5080 would be a great way to go. I've got one and it's just a great module, very useful.

 

Make sure you have the SCSI CD-ROM drive to load sample libs in, and also SCSI storage for saving your sounds. Storage and loading/saving have kind of been the achilles heal on this unit for me. Unfortunately, the smart media memory card has never worked reliably for me at all, and is very slow in addition. So whatever you do for storage, it's got to be SCSI and portable if you want to take the 5080 to gigs and load the memory. A ZIP drive would work fine.

 

Overall the 5080 is a killer synth box, expecially once you start loading up the expansion slots with sound cards.

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Albert,

 

It might be instructive for some of us to hear why having a seemingly "lower quality" hardware sample card -- with comparatively puny sample RAM -- might have advantages over the seemingly "higher quality" 3GB piano sample played on a software sampler. Thoughts?

 

I also take Jan's comments as further evidence that it's not the specs and features that matter, it's what you're familiar with, what works for you and what sounds good to you.

 

rt

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Originally posted by realtrance:

... It might be instructive for some of us to hear why having a seemingly "lower quality" hardware sample card -- with comparatively puny sample RAM -- might have advantages over the seemingly "higher quality" 3GB piano sample played on a software sampler. Thoughts?

 

...

I'll jump in here for a bit. 99% of your live audience will not notice the difference between a 3 gig piano on a soft synth and a 64 meg piano on hardware. 100% of your audience will notice if your computer crashes in the middle of a song. Thankfully, in music, it is not how big it is, it is how you use it.

 

I have GigaStudio 160, Kontakt, SampleTank, B4 and LoungeLizard. Before loading them on a lap top or rack mount computer and going on stage I would ask myself, what will I really gain over my XV-5080 and Motif ES? I have been using drum machines on stage since the days of Sequential Circuits and computer sequencers on stage since the days of DOS 3.1. It has always been risky. Crashes are not fun. When your audience is standing around thinking "Why don't they just play?" 100 software instruments can not replace 1 good, stable, reliable piece of hardware. Face it, 3 gig pianos are acceptable for recording if you cannot use the real thing. There is always something better. But, if you are going to load up a computer and take it on stage, are you doing it for the audience or for yourself?

 

Robert

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Can I add that it's a lot easier to go with what you know. It takes me longer to learn a piece of software that it does for a new piece of hardware. I'm gradually going more and more soft (In more ways than one!), but it takes time.

 

And... hardware has a sound, and if you like it, it makes it hard to give up.

David
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