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Did I make a mistake?


zeronyne

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After I read several long threads on FM synthesis, I bought a TX802 over a TX'4'16 (it was a TX216 with two more TF1's) in a fit of GAS.

 

I've read that the TX802 is essentially a DX7IId. Is that true? Does it sound better than the TX_16's (in terms of output noise)?

 

I hope I didn't make a mistake, but I spent around $100, so I don't feel panicky.

"For instance" is not proof.

 

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Recall that the original DX-7, and each individual TX module, were monotimbral, that rack could've done four different sounds at once max. Also the circuitry in the -802 is newer and will be less noisy; I think you did the right thing! (I still hang on to my TG-77).

Botch

"Eccentric language often is symptomatic of peculiar thinking" - George Will

www.puddlestone.net

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I have a TX516, along with my trustly ol' DX7. I love being able to play 2 or more of the FM voices together with full polyphony, but... I think you made the right choice.

 

The reason?

 

If you don't have a DX7, you'd have a hard time editing the individual modules in the TX416. There's only a few basic parameters (volume, etc.) that you can change from the front panel. You could get a computer to do the editing though, I suppose.

 

I don't know if it applies to the TX802, but something to watch out for - early Yamaha FM synths were designed to work with a limited range of key velocities. Anything velocty value above 110 (I think) will cause voices the be "over modulated", for lack of a better term. Basically, the voices will sound brighter than they are supposed to, being that they were intended to be played from a DX7 or other Yamaha keyboard of the day (with lower velocity limits).

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I don't know if it applies to the TX802, but something to watch out for - early Yamaha FM synths were designed to work with a limited range of key velocities. Anything velocty value above 110 (I think) will cause voices the be "over modulated", for lack of a better term. Basically, the voices will sound brighter than they are supposed to, being that they were intended to be played from a DX7 or other Yamaha keyboard of the day (with lower velocity limits).

I believe what you mean is that if you were programming a sound using the keybed on the DX7 and had velocity affect one of the modulator outputs for example, a midi velocity of 127 would give you a higher modulator output and therefor sound possibly to bright or distorted. But if you did the programming using the midi keyboard to begin with you might set that velocity amount a bit lower. This should therefor not be an issue with any rack mount devices - provided you're creating your own sounds.

 

WHAT??? YOUR USING WHAT???? :eek::eek::eek::D

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Thanks for all the replies. I've owned FM before, but I have a renewed interest due to everyone's love of it around here. :D

 

The only bummer is the meager 64 user patch locations, but I'll be happy if I can find 64 killer sounds that I can use.

 

Thanks again.

"For instance" is not proof.

 

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Hi Markyboard, yes that's exactly it! ;-) If zeronyne programs all of his own sounds, then the velocity "over-modulation" won't be a problem. If he uses existing patch banks, then he might notice that the patches won't sound like they're supposed to.

 

Each patch could be edited with lower operator output levels to compensate, but without knowing what the original patch was supposed to sound like, it might be difficult to program it like the original sound. Of course, this would be a good way to get started programming original sounds too. :idea:

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