Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Your 1st Synth?


Jeebus

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 108
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Originally posted by rylos:

I bought a Davolisint for $300. It had 2 oscillators, and you could switch in different octaves of the same note (kinda like Hammond drawbars, only just on/off settings). And it had a goofy lever on one side that you could yank to pitch bend, but only bend UP.

Maybe it was the Davolisint 2 - I seem to remember that the original only had one oscillator, plus the octave switches and the pitch lever. Wow, I would never have tought that that thing was to be found outside of Italy!!

Later on the girl next door had me build a PAIA Gnome synth for her, and graft it into her Davolisint. Then a couple of years later she gave it all to me for free. So now I have the Davolisint & Gnome sitting in my attic.

That's *really* weird! Any pictures and/or mp3s? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Dave the Rave:

I built my first synth from scratch on "veroboard" in 1976.

Somewhere I have a photo of it....I've been looking for it for a while. Let you know if I find it.

Please. I'm very interested in synth oddities. :)

If you post your photo, I promise I'll take the time to go to my parents' place, ransack the basament till I find the 'synth' I've built as a boy, take a picture, scan it and post it here! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Music*aL:

I've been racking my brain trying to remember the model of my first synth. I checked on the web and can't find any pictures, so, maybe some of you vintage synth gurus can help. It was 1977, I was in the venerable Veneman's Music in D.C., and I walked out with a MOOG. I just can't remember which one it was, and can't find pictures of it, and all of my pics don't show the back or the top. Ugggghhhh!!!

 

Anyway, from looking at the various pics on the web, it looked kinda like the Minitmoog or the Satellite, although the preset flip switches were multicolored and the thing had many more knobs on the top.

 

Well anyway, that was my very first synth.

 

aL

Umm. A Realistic Concertmate, perhaps? It was built by Moog for Radio Shack to be sold in their stores, but I seem to remember that Moog Music also made a version under their own "Moog" name (can't remember the name of the model, sorry), with just a few differences.

 

Anyone?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I briefly owned an RMI 300B and a Rhodes 73 (should of kept it). For a few years I owned a trusty Yamaha CP30, which was a poor man's CP70. CP30 PROS: rock solid, nice action, velocity sensitive, roadworthy. CONS: totally unconvincing piano sound, no MIDI.

 

Sky

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by marino:

Originally posted by Music*aL:

I've been racking my brain trying to remember the model of my first synth. I checked on the web and can't find any pictures, so, maybe some of you vintage synth gurus can help. It was 1977, I was in the venerable Veneman's Music in D.C., and I walked out with a MOOG. I just can't remember which one it was, and can't find pictures of it, and all of my pics don't show the back or the top. Ugggghhhh!!!

 

Anyway, from looking at the various pics on the web, it looked kinda like the Minitmoog or the Satellite, although the preset flip switches were multicolored and the thing had many more knobs on the top.

 

Well anyway, that was my very first synth.

 

aL

Umm. A Realistic Concertmate, perhaps? It was built by Moog for Radio Shack to be sold in their stores, but I seem to remember that Moog Music also made a version under their own "Moog" name (can't remember the name of the model, sorry), with just a few differences.

 

Anyone?

Carlo

 

It's not the concertmate. This synth has a three octave keybed with about 24 preset flip switches, and about a dozen knobs, about six sliders, six switches, and has wood panels all around. I am looking at a picture of it, but can't make out the brand... dagnabit!!!!

 

It does look like a more sophisticated minitmoog or satellite. I am starting to doubt whether it was a moog after all.... Hmmmmm!!!

 

Thanks for trying though!!!

 

aL

Gear: Yamaha MODX8, Mojo 61, NS2 73, C. Bechstein baby grand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was aaaallllllmost a DX7
Sorta like the bicycle I got last week for $12 is almost a Mongoose. :D I'm allowed to say that, I've got a DX7, a DX21, & a pair of DX7II. Never could get more than a couple of good sounds out of the DX21, am getting lots of fun stuff tweaked out of the DX7 stuff.

 

Maybe it was the Davolisint 2 - I seem to remember that the original only had one oscillator, plus the octave switches and the pitch lever. Wow, I would never have tought that that thing was to be found outside of Italy!!

 

Later on the girl next door had me build a PAIA Gnome synth for her, and graft it into her Davolisint. Then a couple of years later she gave it all to me for free. So now I have the Davolisint & Gnome sitting in my attic.

 

That's *really* weird! Any pictures and/or mp3s?

One of these days I'll dig it out of the attic, see if it still works, shove a picture or two of it out. It even came with a schematic!
"shit" happens. Success Takes Focus.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You young pups. :)

 

I got interested in synthesizers...I think it was 1970. I had heard Switched on Back of course, and I knew Keith Emerson was begining to use one, but what really did it for me was experiencing the Gershon Kingsley Moog Quartet at a local college. Imagine never having heard a live synthesizer and your first exposure is listening to four VERY accomplished musicians each playing their own Moog modular. All of this is coming at you in quadraphonic sound (two Bose 801s in each corner)--filter sweeps and bleeps criss-crossing the hall. Hell it would sound fantastic today, back then it was LIFE CHANGING for a young keyboard player.

 

At that time "performance" synths were just starting to appear, but you couldn't walk into a music store and play a Minimoog or 2600. NOBODY stocked them. I did secure a brochure for both a Minimoog and ARP 2600. The 2600 was a little more money and had more features, but it didn't say Moog on the front. I was going to have to sell/trade my main axe, an M3/145, in order to help finance the purchase. I rationalized that, given the fact that a synthesizer had INFINITE sound capabilities (as described in the brochure), by moving those knobs into the exact correct position, I would be able to produce a perfect Hammond organ, as a well as piano, sax, etc. True, just a single note, but just think of the possibilities. Besides, many musicians play monophinc instruments.

 

So I with an M3/145 in trade and $750 (yes I got ripped) I purchased, sight unseen, a Moog Minimoog. It was beautiful. The wood was much nicer than the later mass produced models and it had clear wheels. After about a month of tireless knob turning I came to realize the limitations of INFINITE. Still, I loved it and was the envy of keyboard players near and far. My rig consisted of the Mini and a console piano which we carted to every gig.

 

Busch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Music*aL:

It's not the concertmate. This synth has a three octave keybed with about 24 preset flip switches, and about a dozen knobs, about six sliders, six switches, and has wood panels all around. I am looking at a picture of it, but can't make out the brand... dagnabit!!!!

 

It does look like a more sophisticated minitmoog or satellite. I am starting to doubt whether it was a moog after all.... Hmmmmm!!!

 

Thanks for trying though!!!

 

aL

I'm really interested now. The Satellite and Minitmoog were very similar, but I've never seen one with a dozen knobs on it. IIRC, they had just a set of sliders to the left of the keyboard.

I know that in the early days, Moog also made an instrument that they marketed as an "organ" - I've seen a picture a few years ago, but I can't remember the details, except that it looked rather like a synth. Was your instrument monophonic or polyphonic?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first true keyboard synth was a MicroMoog purchased in 1981. Used the crap outta that & bought a Korg DW8000 to compliment the Moog, which I still have. Sold the Moog around '91 for $100. Jeeze, little did I know... :mad:
"I'm not a monkey anymore..."
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by DJDM:

Juno 106. :)

It has big time sentimental value:

Mee too!!! :) I just ain't ever gonna get rid of it. I don't gig with it anymore, but the pads, bass, and lead sounds that come out of it are totally useful. Mine's in virtually pristine shape. I don't know how I managed that, given the beer I know has been spilled on/in it.

 

Magpel, that's funny, I have a U20 and feel the same way about it you feel about yours. Mine's not missing any keys, but some of the button contacts no longer work. I did find out how to program it eventually (not too hard), and like you I'm looking to sell it. Any takers in San Francisco area? :)

Original Latin Jazz

CD Baby

 

"I am not certain how original my contribution to music is as I am obviously an amateur." Patti Smith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yamaha PSR-36.

 

Pros: very portable, gave me a way to bring a keyboard to college (in '89, which is when I got it); I also liked the "customizeable" percussion

 

Cons: crappy piano sound and feel; nowhere near a full keyboard or full-size keys; no sustain pedal

 

I still have it, mostly for sentimental reasons. :) My "real" keyboard is a Kurzweil PC88, and every now and then I break out the Yamaha for some percussion accompaniment. Mostly, though, it sits in a carrying case in my basement. I don't see myself ever getting rid of it while it still works.

"Is it too much to demand? I want a full house and a rock-n-roll band..." ~ Lucinda Williams
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first keyboard was a DX-27.

 

PROS: I actually got pretty decent sounds out of it, at least at the time. (This was the 80s, people, cheese was in ;) ).

 

CONS: When I listen today to the organ and piano patches I used to use on that thing...God, they sucked!!!. But hey, it was my whole rig back then.

 

SENTIMENTAL VALUE: Well, when I first got back into playing around 18 months ago, I hadn't yet scored any good gear, and I had nothing that came anywhere near a synth lead sound. So I picked up a DX-27 on eBay for $150. I wanted that "HeavySynth" patch. I knew there was better stuff available, but I couldn't afford more than a couple hundred at that point, and I knew the DX would work. I'm still using it in my live rig! It's perfect for Cars covers and suchlike. :D

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My First Synth was a Casio CZ-1000,Which I say in a video for Salt and Peppers Push it! It was pretty cool for the Money. My parents traded in my trumpet for it that had actually gone up in Value. The CZ-1000 did not have a sequencer and did not have the Phat and crunchy sounds of the Yamaha DX line so felt week playing next to my buddy with a DX-7. I sold it to pay for college tuition about 4 years later. But I had a Roland Jupiter 6 in the mean time and had access to an Ensoniq EPS 16 Plus, and a Yamaha DX 100. I am now trying to buy some of these for my son to add to his studio. He is fourteen and way more talented than me!
Z
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

My first keyboard was korg poly 800,

followed by Sh-101 then a K4 kawai

Then Roland w-30 then yami Sy85 then roland sh-5

then various stuff.I now have Dx9,Fizmo mpc2000xl

jx8p a few modules and yamaha a4000 sampler. im getting tommorow a emu e-synth,I have just swappped it for a mo-phat module,the e-synth needed fixing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first synth that I ever purchased with my hard-earned cash was a brand new DX7 (tough to do at minimum wage in those days!). I still have it.

 

For many years before that I had unlimited free use of an SH-1, RS-505 (Roland string synth), Fender Rhodes, and a Moog Satellite.

 

I cut my teeth on synthesis with the SH-1 and to a lesser degree the Satellite. Unfortunately, both were stolen about 3 years ago. :cry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first was a pair of PAiA synths, the Stringz'n'Thingz, and I believe it's called a 4700, the one with the tiny hexadecimal computer. It wasn't a Minimoog, but it forced you to know what you were doing, since it had to be patched with cords to make sound. I still have them both in the attic, and are probably disfunctional relics by now.
This keyboard solo has obviously been tampered with!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Casio CZ1000. I don't realy remember what I did with that thing. I do remeber that I stopped using it shortly after the Roland W-30 Sampling Workstation came out. I still have that one and every other keyboard/tone generator I've bought since. They do have a certain sentimental value to them.

Ray Zarzaca

KMA Productions

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first synth was ...

 

http://www.vintagesynth.org/roland/images/rs09.jpg

 

But then I got one of these:

 

http://www.vintagesynth.org/yamaha/dx_7.jpg

 

And one of these:

 

http://www.fenderrhodes.org/rhodes/supersite/pictures/stage2a.gif

 

I took a few years off actively playing music and sold all of my gear. Now I am trying to convince my wife that I need one of these:

 

http://www.sweetwater.com/images/products/Yamaha/S90-large.jpg

 

Don.

Our country is not the only thing to which we owe our allegiance. It is also owed to justice and to humanity. Patriotism consists not in waving the flag, but in striving that our country shall be righteous as well as strong: James Bryce
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started out taking piano lessons, but jumped over to guitar. After many years, I got bored with the guitar and wanted to get into sequencing & synth's for different sounds for recording. My first synth was an Ensonic SQ-1 workstation, then I got into sound modules for the sequencer, for new and improved sounds, Proteus 1 & 2, Vintage Keys, Roland's JV-880 & JV 1080, then I wanted better contol to create sounds and motion with music and got the JP-8000. The SQ-1 got traded in over the course of time. I was pressed for space and needed a smaller keyboard. I bought the Fatar Studio 610 midi controller, currently not being used. The JP-8000 is my favorite of all that I've had. I enjoy going to the music store and playing grand piano's though. I just don't have the room or the money for one, but if I did, I would want one. A nice Petrof or Steinway would keep me happy for a long time. :)

Living' in the shadow,

of someone else's dream....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

from this

 

http://members.aol.com/sydyn/sydyn/keybd2.jpg

 

to this...quantum leap :D

http://www.provox.hr/images/K2600.jpg

Joe Pine (60's talk show host who sported a wooden leg) to Frank Zappa -- "So, with your long hair, I guess that makes you a woman." Frank Zappa's response -- "So, with your wooden leg, I guess that makes you a table."

 

 

http://www.nowhereradio.com/artists/album.php?aid=2001&alid=-1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...