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Your 1st Synth?


Jeebus

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Yamaha PSR-510. Used it for a while, using it as a controller when I first started building a softsynth-based studio a couple of years ago.

 

Pros. My first board. I could afford it (in India it costs a lot more than in the US). Portable, 61-keys

 

Cons. For its cost, not too many, but man that pitch wheel sucked.

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The Jeeebus asked:

So what was your 1st synth, and when did you get it? What were it's pros and cons? Did you keep it or sell it? Does it have sentimental value?

http://www.vintagesynth.org/roland/images/roland_jx8p.jpg

 

A Roland JX-8P, the summer of 1987. I cannot tell you much about it because it was stolen after I had it three weeks. :(

 

I wanted to make Depeche Mode sounds! ;)

 

Didnt buy another until the summer of 1990...a Roland D-70. :eek: I quickly traded it (for no loss!) for a Roland JD-800 when it appeared the following year.

 

In a sense though, my first real synth was a 6-voice polyphonic analog sound board for the Apple ][ called the Mockingboard by Sweet Micro Systems. Programming envelopes in hexadecimal is fun! :rolleyes:

Go tell someone you love that you love them.
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Here's one no one mentioned yet...

 

Roland SH-5 :thu:

 

I got it around 1977 when I was about 15-16. Didn't tell my parents I withdrew all my savings, about $900, to buy it. They found out and made me return it a month later! That was a great synth, sort of Roland's answer to the Minimoog/Odyssey.

 

Funny thing...about a year later, and with my parents knowledge, I bought an ARP Odyssey (black/gold) w/an ARP-logoed Anvil case for about the same price as the SH-5. Still have it.

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Originally posted by aeon:

A Roland JX-8P, the summer of 1987. I cannot tell you much about it because it was stolen after I had it three weeks. :(

That sucks, aeon.

 

I had a JX8P, and I thought it was an excellent synth (especially if you had the PG200 programmer, which I did). I replaced my Juno 106 with it, and vastly preferred the 8P...two oscillators per voice 'n all...zippier filters as well... :thu:

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

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MiniMoog (#6450?), purchased in 1975.

 

Was able to pay off my dad quickly because of the extra gigs available, though frequently I played LH bass and keys RH. Forced to sell it to help pay for college in 1980, one of the bigger mistakes I ever made (after all the student loans I took out, $2000 wouldn't have made ANY difference).

 

With recent Voyager purchase, I am no longer mad at my parents......

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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

Originally posted by aeon:

A Roland JX-8P, the summer of 1987. I cannot tell you much about it because it was stolen after I had it three weeks. :(

That sucks, aeon.

 

I had a JX8P, and I thought it was an excellent synth (especially if you had the PG200 programmer, which I did). I replaced my Juno 106 with it, and vastly preferred the 8P...two oscillators per voice 'n all...zippier filters as well... :thu:

 

dB

I thought that you had to have the PG-800 to program the JX-8P?

 

Carl

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Mine was a Yamaha something or other.. I was around 7 or 8 at the time I got it, so that is about..

 

1991 to 1992..

 

my dad said it was about $100 or so

 

If someone could help me find an image and info of that board that'd be awesome.. I could recognize it if I saw it..

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A Yamaha CS 01 monophonic , tiny keys, could be battery powered.

I bought it in 82 .It actually sounded pretty fat.

A girl I used to do a duo with borrowed it in about 88 haven't seen it since.

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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

Originally posted by aeon:

A Roland JX-8P, the summer of 1987. I cannot tell you much about it because it was stolen after I had it three weeks. :(

That sucks, aeon.
Agreed...and in a weird twist of fate, the thiefs car was hit by another car later that day. My JX-8P was destroyed and the thief was killed instantly.

 

Karma? :eek:

Go tell someone you love that you love them.
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I made a purcase order for my school for a Juno 106 but the first I could afford was the CZ1000.

 

Before that some borrowed mini's and sequential sixtraks and such.

 

Pro's - easy to operate considering, multi timbral, worked great with a MCxx, 4 channels of pure program change bliss :P

 

Cons - none aside from the fact it wasn't fairlight as that is what I REALLY wanted.

Names to Remember:

Charles Stepney & Emory Cook

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Originally posted by aeon:

in a weird twist of fate, the thiefs car was hit by another car later that day. My JX-8P was destroyed and the thief was killed instantly.

 

Karma? :eek:

LOL! :D

 

aeon, that was a very amusing carma ... er, karma joke (pun)! :thu:

 

Does this mean that the thief who stole my Moog Liberation was merely liberating my synth?!? :eek:

 

;)

 

Seriously though, how many of us lost our first synth due to theft?

 

Best,

 

Geoff

My Blue Someday appears on Apple Music | Spotify | YouTube | Amazon

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Yamaha DX-27 was my first, followed closely by an Oberheim Matrix-6.

 

Pros: Yamaha DX-27 - Sounded good

Oberheim Matrix-6 - Velocity sensitive, easier to program than the DX

 

Cons: Yamaha - not velocity sensitive

Oberheim- I didn't have it long enough to know.

 

FWIW, I traded both of them at the same time for a Schiller grand piano, I think I got the long end of that stick. :D

**Standard Disclaimer** Ya gotta watch da Ouizel, as he often posts complete and utter BS. In this case however, He just might be right. Eagles may soar, but Ouizels don't get sucked into jet engines.
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Originally posted by Krakit:

 

I thought that you had to have the PG-800 to program the JX-8P?

 

Carl

Yes, the PG-200 was for the JX3P and MKS-30. Of course, you didn't HAVE to have the PG-800 to program the 8P, as it was fully programmable from the front panel. 'Twas incredibly painful, though.

 

My first synth (not counting the Yamaha PS-25 with polka beat that my folks bought me one Christmas) was a Yamaha DX-21. It was followed fairly soon after by a Roland TR-505, TX81Z and Midiverb II. (I think I just dated myself, although I'm not as old as some of you... ;) ).

 

Pros: It was aaaallllllmost a DX7 and had those trendy, semi-realistic sounds. Well-built. Crazy complicated synth engine, which kept me busy for hours at a time.

 

Cons: No velocity keyboard, and pretty shitty sounds when you get right down to it.

 

It was a good board to learn on. Because of the age I was when I came up, I knew FM programming pretty much inside and out long before I ever knew was a low-pass filter was. Is that screwed up, or what?

 

(Edited for content)

r33k

 

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Well, I didn't mean that you "had to have" the PG-800 to program, since I do and did all my JX-8P programming through the front panel.

 

I just meant that the PG-200 wouldn't (or I at least thought) couldn't cut it and that you had to upgrade to the PG-800 with the 8P model.

 

:P

 

Carl

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My first synth was a Univox MiniKorg, bought to play bass in a trio. Real analog, pretty fat for one oscillator (with sub-osc.) Sold that to buy an Arp Odyssey with the PPC pads; that was stolen, so I replaced it with an OB8 :thu: , later sold to buy an M1 :rolleyes:

Composer/Performer at Roger Hooper Music

Product Trainer at CASIO

www.rogerhooper.com

 

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Originally posted by Michael Erwin:

Originally posted by Krakit:

 

I thought that you had to have the PG-800 to program the JX-8P?

 

Carl

Yes, the PG-200 was for the JX3P and MKS-30.
You guys are, of course, correct. Guess I had a senior moment... ;):D

 

The funny thing is, I believe I've owned pretty much every Roland programmer (PG800, PG-1000 and the MPG80) except for the PG200.

 

D'oh... :rolleyes:

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

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Yamaha DX-7.

It was in all the MTV videos of the day, plus the D50 had just come out (which I desperately wanted, but could not aford). Many people were unloading their DX-7s cheap, to buy the D50.

 

Programming was, of course, a nightmare and I was never too happy with the thin sound. I really wanted an analog, a-la OB-8.

 

I eventually bought a Korg DSS-1, and sold the DX-7. I was much happier with the Korg, but I did miss the action of the DX-7 keyboard and the stylish green buttons.

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Time to show how young I am! My first synth was a Korg N5EX! Bought in the summer of '99 (played it till my fingers bled...cough) I still have it, but that's not as impressive as still having your original ARPs or Moogs. I had heard my friend's Trinity and loved the sound so much I decided to invest in a board too. I found this one in my price range and sold my car, an '87 chevy camaro, to some sucker for alot more than it was worth. (total PoS!) I found a good deal on a website and placed an order. I didn't really know much about the synth, but I've never regretted the purchase or the sale of my car.

 

Pros: I learned how to play the keys on it. Good pads, and decent samples. Nice organ sounds.

 

Cons: Not aging to well. Sounds too thin for me. (my MS2k sounds to thin to me as well) If I ever get a wavestation then this one would be relegated to controller status. Nothing too memorable beyond the pads and the organs. Taught me to hate menu driven synthesis! The only thing more dense then the menu interface is the manual. lol.

 

Sentimental value? Sure it was my first, but I'll sell it to finance a bigger, better, faster board. (or maybe some analog modules?)

"The heart of the machine is evolving, the soul has emerged, and all who embrace it will reach Teknotic Nirvana." ~ Nos Tehbi "Book of the Teknos"
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My first was an Arp Odyssey around 1973-74. Herbie Hancock and Gearge Duke were using them so I figured I'd try one also.

 

Pros - Great sounds for two oscillators. Did a bunch of recording with it.

 

Cons - It was a fragile machine and I had to have it repaired on three different occasions. Also, I should have gottened a compressor/limiter to go with it because those VCA's could sure spike!

 

Ended up selling it and getting a Hohner clavinet and then purchasing a Minimoog (great axe).

Jazz Patrol, a jazzrock/fusion experience.
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Prophet 600, the very first production instrument with MIDI. I knew that MIDI was going to be HUGE, and I wanted in on it. I'm glad that I procrastinated in buying the Juno 60 that I'd had my eye on.

 

The 600 was not as glamorous as the Prophet 5, but it had a sound with a lot of balls. I don't use is much anymore, but when I want to expose my romplers and VA's for the weaklings that they truly are, I pull the Prophet out of storage for an hour and let them go toe to toe. No comparison. Now, if that MIDI response were only a little faster...

The Black Knight always triumphs!

 

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Ah yes...a Kawai SX-210, in the early/mid 80's...I loved that little synth. If I'm not mistaken, it was analog under digital control...no MIDI...it's still in my area...I've seen other people playing it, next thing I know it's been passed on to someone else!!!

 

- Steve

:D

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I've been racking my brain trying to remember the model of my first synth. I checked on the web and can't find any pictures, so, maybe some of you vintage synth gurus can help. It was 1977, I was in the venerable Veneman's Music in D.C., and I walked out with a MOOG. I just can't remember which one it was, and can't find pictures of it, and all of my pics don't show the back or the top. Ugggghhhh!!!

 

Anyway, from looking at the various pics on the web, it looked kinda like the Minitmoog or the Satellite, although the preset flip switches were multicolored and the thing had many more knobs on the top.

 

Well anyway, that was my very first synth.

 

aL

Gear: Yamaha MODX8, Mojo 61, NS2 73, C. Bechstein baby grand.

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I built my first synth from scratch on "veroboard" in 1976. I designed some of my own circuitry and plagerized a lot more from other schematics that I managed to lay my hands on (minimoog, ARP etc.) It was mono, had a 49-note keyboard and had a pale blue front panel with a kind of patch panel for signal routing in the center. It was STEREO though - two ADSR's each with their own envelope generator. It was real cool, but it had a tendancy to go out of tune quite quickly. The VCO's were not very well thermally compensated.

 

Somewhere I have a photo of it....I've been looking for it for a while. Let you know if I find it. Of course, it's long since been scrapped - more's the pity.

 

It was quite a few years later that I managed to scrape up the cash for a "real" synth...

 

:DTR

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Juno 1! The salesman was really trying to get me to buy a Juno 2 touting its larger velocity sensitive keyboard and patch cartridge but I decided to save a couple hundred bucks. What can I say, I was a guitarist.
You shouldn't chase after the past or pin your hopes on the future.
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Other than some handmade stuff I cobbled together, back about '75 when I was a teenager I bought a Davolisint for $300. Added a few extra things into it, but quickly tired of it, even after tacking on padded vinyl all over the case. It had 2 oscillators, and you could switch in different octaves of the same note (kinda like Hammond drawbars, only just on/off settings). And it had a goofy lever on one side that you could yank to pitch bend, but only bend UP. Fell in love with the new Micromoog at the local music store. Sold the Davolisint to the red-headed girl next door for $300, but didn't have the rest of what it took for the Moog. Came home from school one day (right before I got kicked out of school) and found the Moog on the kitchen table. My Dad had kicked in his own money (that he really couldn't spare) and got it for me. Later on the girl next door had me build a PAIA Gnome synth for her, and graft it into her Davolisint. Then a couple of years later she gave it all to me for free. So now I have the Davolisint & Gnome sitting in my attic. And I still have the Micromoog. Right after I got it I found out that it had a much meatier sound if I wired in a switch to feed the output of the filter back into the filter control voltage input. Lots of sentimental value in that one.
"shit" happens. Success Takes Focus.
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