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chopping my leslie


micah

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I want to replace the standard Jensen speakers in my leslie and make it SCREAM. I met this cat down in Sacramento. He said that he replaced the sub with a JBL and he replaced the original driver with a Peavey horn driver. I am tempted to try this but I have never done it. Can anyone give me tips on what speakers to buy that will make my leslie have thunderous lows and screaming highs? Thanks in advance.
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When I owned a Leslie, and after I blew the original speakers on a job, I bought a 15" ElectroVoice speaker. For some reason the SRO model (?) comes to mind. I believe that had a lifetime warranty. Every couple of years I'd send it in to have it reconed.

 

I learned after that to always keep a spare for when I had to send one out for reconing.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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I made a couple of changes to my 122 that improved the sound, in my opinion. I replaced the stock Jensen driver with an Atlas PD60 driver and that thing is unbelievable. I also replaced the 15" speaker with a JBL (cannot remember the model number but something like a 2820B). You need to make sure replacement speakers are 16 ohms, depending on which Leslie you have.

 

Regards,

Eric

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The topic of this thread makes me cringe. (Imagine "chopping" the fine-lookin' wooden chest of a Leslie cabinet.)

:mad::confused::P:cry:

 

You have to sound good to yourself,

so set your Leslie as close to you as practically possible.

 

Right behind you

(on a sturdy kitchen-table-height table)

is marvellous. :D

 

Brother, then you can really hear the tone, balls, and scream of your keys through that "woodie"!

 

If you really need to go beyond that

(other than micing it through the PA)

"there are 600 ways to Chicago".

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Funny... I've always preferred the sound of the stock drivers. I've heard a lot of JBL'ed Leslies that are loud and punchy, but some warmth and detail is lost. I think that having a fully up-to-snuff amp in there is important. Good Hammond techs will service the Leslie's amp and replace components as necessary. You'd be surprsied what a fully-tuned stock amp, with updated capacitors and good power tubes (I like Sovtek 6550's, and the whole new-old-stock tube thing is a world you can explore) will do for you.

 

If the title of your thread referred to physically chopping down your Leslie... don't. I've seen chops where the top and bottom halves come apart, and IMHO you wind up with two boxes that are more of a pain to deal with than one big one. Look for a 142 or 145... the short-boy equivalents, respectively, of the 122 and 147. I have a 142 as my gig Leslie with casters on the bottom and it's very manageable.

Stephen Fortner

Principal, Fortner Media

Former Editor in Chief, Keyboard Magazine

Digital Piano Consultant, Piano Buyer Magazine

 

Industry affiliations: Antares, Arturia, Giles Communications, MS Media, Polyverse

 

 

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Originally posted by SteveFortner:

Funny... I've always preferred the sound of the stock drivers. I've heard a lot of JBL'ed Leslies that are loud and punchy, but some warmth and detail is lost. I think that having a fully up-to-snuff amp in there is important. Good Hammond techs will service the Leslie's amp and replace components as necessary. You'd be surprsied what a fully-tuned stock amp, with updated capacitors and good power tubes (I like Sovtek 6550's, and the whole new-old-stock tube thing is a world you can explore) will do for you.

I second this. Replacing the stock speakers & drivers with stuff other than stock speakers & drivers will give you a different tone. I know that's what you're looking for, but I'd leave them alone. Also if there's nothing wrong with them why replace them. Don't replace them until you have trouble. I had a stock horn driver that used to buzz a little bit, I noticed it, hardly anyone else did. I know you're looking for more volume & the simple trick is to take a solid state power amp, something that is full range, take a signal from your Leslie amp to it & from it to the speakers. You'll need to have something installed to set up the correct ohmage. You'll now get the great tone & warmth with the power that you are looking for. The stock stuff will be able to take the extra power, unless they are already worn out. Don't use Peavey. The words Peavey & tone don't exist in the same sentence unless the words "don't have" are in the middle. Also, I'm not sure how the rotating horn mechanism matches up with one of those drivers. Also don't use a guitar amp for your power amp. Yes I know that in years passed guys used Twins, Hiwatts, etc. but that was back in the days of they used what ever was handy. Guitar amps don't have the frequencies that the full range amps. The sound will not have the highs & lows you are looking for. Another question is, what are you playing? Maybe you need to boost the signal & a A.R.T.Tube MP or a Behringer TUBE ULTRAGAIN MIC100 preamp will do the job.

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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This may be a silly suggestion, but why not simply mic your leslie, and EQ / overdrive / put FX on the signal to your heart's content, leaving your leslie in it's pristine and highly desirable state?

Tom F.

"It is what it is."

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Mic'ing a Leslie is necessary, but it can be challenging in a tight stage situation where the Leslie iteself isn't putting out quite enough clean level. Depending on the mics and pres used, you can get a lot of neighboring instruments, and a lot of feedback depending on where your monitor is. I've had good luck with the budget condenser brand ADK... two small SC-1's on the top and a A51 on the bottom, all going into a Mackie 1202 vlz's pres. Main feed goes out to the house, and either control room or aux 1 (depending on whether I'm monitoring in stereo or mono) goes to my Mackie speaker(s). If possible, I'll put the Leslie off in a wing, but always as far from drum kits and guitar amps as I can manage.

Stephen Fortner

Principal, Fortner Media

Former Editor in Chief, Keyboard Magazine

Digital Piano Consultant, Piano Buyer Magazine

 

Industry affiliations: Antares, Arturia, Giles Communications, MS Media, Polyverse

 

 

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