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Yanni (ok, ok, I know) Why 6 Tritons?


Krakit

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Just what exactly do people find so "bad" about Yanni's music? :confused:

Brett G.

Hall Piano Company, Inc.

Metairie, Louisiana

Kurzweil Keyboard Dept. Manager

 

"My dream is to have sex in odd time signatures." - J. Rudess

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From what little I've heard, a lack of harmonic complexity ... some of the pieces I heard sound like music for creating an atmosphere.

 

Very repetitive, simplistic, predictible ... you get the message. I'm sure my mother would have liked it.

 

The tunes I listened to I could have done an accurate record copy in much less time than any other other kind of music I have ever transcribed.

 

The dentist will see you next.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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There's nothing wrong with music as Atmosphere. In general I gave up on trying to figure out why or why not I like a piece of music. The reasons are rarely consistent although they follow guidelines. I love early Tangerine Dream, I can't stand Yanni. Why ... don't really know, but I do know how I respnd when I listen to something written by either artist.

 

That said "Live at Acropolis" made a good spectacle and there were some killer musicians there. The phalanx of keyboards (this was pre-Triton wasn't it) looked cool too.

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If you listen to enough music __and__ if you have a very good understanding of theory (traditional and jazz), counterpoint, compositional techniques, etc., you can reasonably size up someone's musical IQ. I think it's fair to say he is not a genius.

 

Even though I know he is self taught, I would have guessed that anyway.

 

But what do I know, I'm sitting behind this computer keyboard on a Saturday evening and I don't have a job.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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If you listen to enough music __and__ if you have a very good understanding of theory (traditional and jazz), counterpoint, compositional techniques, etc., you can reasonably size up someone's musical IQ. I think it's fair to say he is not a genius.

For his limited abilities, he has done pretty well. From a business standpoint, few ever come close to achieving what Yanni has. And you've got to give the guy credit for his advanced performance skills. That Triton at the lowest tier is at his feet, so he has to play with his toes. Wish I could do that :confused::( ...

 

Also, compositional skills are only part of the music production package. A lot of ambient music for example has almost nothing going on as far as melodic development. What's of interest is the arrangement and orchestration, tone colors and about how sounds evolve and interact... aspects that are actually not particularly well covered in traditional music theory. Well crafted, emotionally powerful sounds used effectively can redeem very simple and otherwise musically "uninteresting" material. From that perspective, some of Yanni's music is pretty well done.

 

~Peter Schouten

Pyramid Sound Productions

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Originally posted by Togakure:

Just what exactly do people find so "bad" about Yanni's music? :confused:

I think the "bad" part of his music is the fact that it's overly romantic and too sweet at times.

(Let's put a big DOT here).

I am back.
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I think it's instructive that the thread picked up discussion on both of these two. That's appropriate.

 

Anyone ever read what Pat Metheny said about kennyg recording over Louis Armstrong solos, as if to be playing with satch? Sort of like the Natalie Cole singing a duet with her father kind of thing. Metheny went nuts over it!

"Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."
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Soundmeister,

 

 

Do you think Yanni actually arranges and orchestrates his music or orders out?

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Ok, let's step away from Yanni and Kenny G for a moment and get back to the real question that I asked.

 

So far, I think that they only reasons that could possibly explain having six Tritons (or any other modern keyboard with RAM) are the following:

 

1. Showmanship, stage dressing, looks these all amount to the same thing.

 

2. Different patches and too lazy to program the chain into a foot controller. This seems plausible to me if terribly expensive. I mean, if you use six Triton sounds for everything that you do, it might be very convenient to have six Tritons each with one of these sounds in it. Very wasteful, but still it makes a sort of sense.

 

3. Huge endorsement deal from Korg for doing so.

 

4. Well, there is no "4". I can't think of any other reason that sounds plausible.

 

Carl

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I personally think it is just so people watching him live will be like "WOW! LOOK AT ALL OF THOSE KEYBOARDS! HE MUST REALLY BE A WORLD CLASS PROFESSIONAL TO USE ALL OF THOSE!"... a lot of keyboardists do that, it does look look, and you can play in different positions to make it look a bit more interesting. A lot of Yanni's fans are non musicians that dont have a clue anyway.

 

Also, Geoffrey Downes is one of my favorite keyboardists, back off!

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Why have you dismissed my theory that he prefers the Triton as a controller, that they're rigged to trigger sounds from offstage modules, and that the configuration allows him to reach for the sounds that he wants when and where he's comfortable playing them, AND perhaps, the last one or two are there for redundancy (in case something goes awry with another unit). This is perfectly feasible scenario. The other scenarios that I see offered - all 100% speculation, I might add - seem to grow out of the desire to label the guy a "show off." Granted, I'm not a big Yanni fan, but at least I'll show him a little respect. If the guy had money to burn and wanted to "show off," why not put a Synclavier or a Moog modular up there? Why not something more expensive than a Triton, like six K2600's or six Andromeda's? I'm willing to believe that the guy just happens to like playing the Triton keyboard and that he find this configuration comfortable.

The Black Knight always triumphs!

 

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Yanni has another keyboardist in the band, I think his name is Ming Freeman(?)When I saw Yanni 5 years ago, Ming seemed to be playing most of the keyboard parts when Yanni would prance around the stage. Maybe, those Tritons are midi triggered by Ming from his keyboard rig.
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Ceasar's wife must not only be fair, but look fair as well. This is an old latin proverb - but fits to Yianni's public image (that i hate, by the way, as i hate his his music, but that's another story)

Yannis (just coincidence, a common name in my country)

Athens, Greece

yannidim
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Originally posted by Dan South:

Why have you dismissed my theory that he prefers the Triton as a controller, that they're rigged to trigger sounds from offstage modules, and that the configuration allows him to reach for the sounds that he wants when and where he's comfortable playing them, AND perhaps, the last one or two are there for redundancy (in case something goes awry with another unit). This is perfectly feasible scenario. The other scenarios that I see offered - all 100% speculation, I might add - seem to grow out of the desire to label the guy a "show off." Granted, I'm not a big Yanni fan, but at least I'll show him a little respect. If the guy had money to burn and wanted to "show off," why not put a Synclavier or a Moog modular up there? Why not something more expensive than a Triton, like six K2600's or six Andromeda's? I'm willing to believe that the guy just happens to like playing the Triton keyboard and that he find this configuration comfortable.

I can understand someone (with lots of cash) using each Triton for each sound that he might use in a concert. I even listed that as number 2 in my suppositions list. I think that using Tritons only as controllers is a bit of a stretch though. Don't the Tritons have the same keyboard action as some of Korg's less expensive digital pianos?

 

Carl

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Originally posted by HCMF:

You guyz still on this?

 

In the olden days didnt bands or artist arrive

with 2,3,4 and sometimes 6 Minimoogs on stage?

There is a big difference between using multiple monophonic non programmable (no RAM to save patches in) keyboards and using six Tritons.

 

I think we can all understand the immediate benifits of multiple Minimoogs when you don't want to waste the audiences time changing sound voices between songs.

 

There is no such excuse for more than 2 (1 really :rolleyes: ) Korg Tritons which are polyphonic and have patch banks in them.

 

Carl

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  • 1 year later...

Time to wake this long long buried topic.

 

Yanni at the Royal Albert Hall -live.

What a great concert for a young teenager/ aspiring musician. He sure has all the drama/romanticism/sweetness one can hope for but he also has great soloists and catchy tunes and a big production machinery.

I remember him playing a bouzouki -kind of thingy sound from his k´boards.

 

ps. everyone has to have a Yanni period in his/her life.period. I know I had. :cool::D:D

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Weird. Louis eventually played off-center, too...mouthpiece fixed over to one side. But that was after he scarred his chops up being Satchmo.

 

Now, vectoring it back: I've often wondered why some folks seem to value 'musicianship' so much more highly than emotional impact, even if they themselves don't feel the impact of a given artist or work.

 

Yanni's a fairly decent example of this. I've gotten rid of all but one or two of his early CDs, which I rarely listen to, but when I was a young(er) 'un, knowing that he recorded his first couple of efforts all by hisself in his home studio was an inspiration.

 

Same with Larry Fast. Some of his Synergy stuff traipses lightly through the land of Cheez, but he was what got me into all this keyboard nonsense in the first place.

 

So Yanni doesn't bust out with a solo based on a Sumerian musical structure deciphered from the cuneiform. And he's no Wendy Carlos, who's so far out into the land of theory that she composes entire albums based on scales and modes she invented. But isn't there something to be said for music that moves people?

 

Is it about communication...or about being clever?

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I think some people are being too harsh.

 

The recent Yanni albums... those are kind of blah! - nothing much beyond romantic syrup.

 

But one of his earliest, "Keys To Imagination", is still among my favorites. Simple? Yes, but music is more than just complexity. Lacking surprise elements? But that's the point, the album is almost entirely major chords, in a fairly dynamic and joyful mood; no place for shady subconscious analysis there.

 

With his good looks and romantic stuff, i can see how his female audience is in love with him, and i agree that there's not much in his recent works, musically. But I'm against discarding his entire work because of that.

Florin Andrei

 

http://florin.myip.org/

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Somewhere i read an old article about Yanni and his setup. At that time it was:

1- Korg 01/W proX (88 keys)

2- 01/W pro (76)

3- 01/W (61)

4- Trinity proX (88)

5- Trinity pro (76)

6- Trinity (61)

 

It was divided in 2 stands, each with 3 tiers...of course, 01s on one side and trinitys on the other.

I don't remeber if the moss expansion or some 01 cards were included but it doesn't matter.

Yanni probably doesn't want to "risk" in program change and, because he HAVE money for keyboards, had chosen this setup for some good-looking reason...simple isn't it?

 

Perhaps instead of 6 tritons, they were 3 triton + 3 trinity (if he likes the old sound and the same tipe of setup configuration), they may look pretty similar on stage but i really don't know that for sure.

Bye.

Atreus

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Originally posted by Yabba:

Now, vectoring it back: I've often wondered why some folks seem to value 'musicianship' so much more highly than emotional impact, even if they themselves don't feel the impact of a given artist or work.

 

So Yanni doesn't bust out with a solo based on a Sumerian musical structure deciphered from the cuneiform. And he's no Wendy Carlos, who's so far out into the land of theory that she composes entire albums based on scales and modes she invented. But isn't there something to be said for music that moves people?

 

Is it about communication...or about being clever?

Well there seem to be some who do both - Wes Montgomery said he liked to "play pretty" but he's also every jazz guitarist's idol for his chops. Brecker is another. Metheny on the other hand couldn't communicate with a popular audience to save his life (Check his guest solo spots on Bruce Hornsby's Harbor Lights - he struggles to say anything in 16 bars). Tchaikovsky is syrup to my ears but his music is emtionally happening. But one listen and you got it all. Sibelius is the same. I'd put alot of Mozart in the same category. I find most Mozart extremely predictable and therefore unsatisfying on one level. But on another his music is moving. So Yanni can't read music, neither could Errol Garner or Jimmy Smith (Oliver Nelson apparently found this out and rolled up to a session with a lead sheet that just said "play. lay out. play. lay out ..."). And what do you all make of George Winston?

I don't think Yanni has a Korg endorsement, and if he has well someone at Korg is pretty stupid, cause he ain't the idol of up and coming keyboard players, those who are looking to buy a new synth. I don't see young players wanting to imitate Yanni so there's no Kenny G issue here.

If his music is so simple (which it is theoretically, technically, etc.), well go ahead, you write some and get yourself 6 tritons, a wig and a Greek/Latin monicker and take on the world.

Jealous you are, that's all.

And don't tell me Rick Wakeman had Moog stacks just for the patch layout. They went with cape. What he really needed was a good hairdresser ...

Gig keys: Hammond SKpro, Korg Vox Continental, Crumar Mojo 61, Crumar Mojo Pedals

 

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