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To create an "Organ Slide"


RickoSouave

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I am not even sure I am using the proper term but here we go anyway.

In one of the song I am writting, I want a slide on the organ that will go from the bottom end to the proper chord. Now the problem that I have is that I can hear each and every note that I press when I do the slide.

 

I have attached a couple of examples that I would like to use in my song. Please bear in mind that I am not copying a particular song, part of a song, but want only to replicate the "organ slide"

 

www.forbiddendream.net/Organ_Intro_1.mp3 is an example of what I exactly want to do in my song.

 

www.forbiddendream.net/Organ_Intro_2.mp3 is from a Dream Theater song.

www.forbiddendream.net/Organ_Intro_3.mp3 . This third song is also from a Dream Theater song.

 

Anyone willing to share their knowledge as to how to recreate these "organ slides" either on a Triton Classic 61 keys or a Yamaha Motif-Rack. Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Thanks

Ricko

*************************

Ricko

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Not that I can lay claim to being a great keyboardist, but my usual method is to use the thumb of my left hand (nail side down on the keys) and quickly drag it from the low notes to the high notes, and quickly chord with my right hand at the end of the glissando.

 

I'm sure some real B3 players will be along shortly to offer you some alternative technique suggestions.

 

BTW, welcome to the forums. :wave:

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Hi, Ricko

 

You could call it a glissando or a smear. I've also heard it called a wipe.

 

The usual techinique is to "smear" white keys with the palm of your hand against the front edge of the keys, but that is better suited for traditional rounded "waterfall" style keys you'd find on a real Hammond or some of the "clone wheel" organs. What you want is the effect of pressing several keys at the same time as you go up the keyboard. It's a different effect than what you'd hear from a pianist.

 

Here's a good link to organ playing tips:

http://archive.keyboardonline.com/midi/hammond.shtml

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It's easier if you have two manuals on a B3. Smear upwards with the palm or fingers of one hand on one keyboard and hit the chord with the other manual as the smear ends. You can do the same thing on one keyboard but it's trickier - smear upwards with your left hand into the right hand as it hits the chord at the end of the smear. At least that's how I do it.
"Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown."
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Originally posted by Mark Zeger:

Hi, Ricko

 

You could call it a glissando or a smear. I've also heard it called a wipe.

 

The usual techinique is to "smear" white keys with the palm of your hand against the front edge of the keys, but that is better suited for traditional rounded "waterfall" style keys you'd find on a real Hammond or some of the "clone wheel" organs. What you want is the effect of pressing several keys at the same time as you go up the keyboard. It's a different effect than what you'd hear from a pianist.

 

Here's a good link to organ playing tips:

http://archive.keyboardonline.com/midi/hammond.shtml

This is correct, if there really is a correct way.

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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Originally posted by dloving:

It's easier if you have two manuals on a B3. Smear upwards with the palm or fingers of one hand on one keyboard and hit the chord with the other manual as the smear ends. You can do the same thing on one keyboard but it's trickier - smear upwards with your left hand into the right hand as it hits the chord at the end of the smear. At least that's how I do it.

This was developed because on a Hammond the percussion only fired when complete release of the keys on the entire top manual was done or Legato (someone will correct me if I have the wrong term) playing & also to allow the smear to be complete up to the keys/chord you are playing. You would smear on the lower keyboard all the way up to the keys where the chord is, this doesn't sound like an important detail but it does make a difference.

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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Originally posted by MrDGreen:

Hi,

 

As a long-time B3 admirer, I usually do the slide on the black keys with the palm. It's usually easier than the whites on most keyboards as the blacks have the angled face and shorter length, so your hand has less chance of snagging and the slide is more consistent.

 

David

This is very cool if you are F# or B. Try it.

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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Originally posted by nosamiam:

And if you are married and have bony fingers, take off your wedding band! OUCH!!

Doesn't happen so much with the waterfall style keys, but on synth style keys, you could also break one as well as hurt yourself.

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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True on both accounts - synth keys are just not strong enough to take the B3 smear on a routine basis. The old DX7 could do this, but not my DX7-II. For plastic synthy keys, you can't do a full smear unless you are being very careful, and who has time?

 

On the real deal, we use the palm (or sometimes back of the hand) to get multiple notes at once. If I intend to end with a chord, I'll use the back of my hand, and as I aproach the end, turn over (over the fingers, not sideways) so as I reach the end, my fingers are basically straight up, and can just reach for the chord.

 

The back of the hand works fine on synth keys, too, as you're gliding, not pushing. But you won't typically get as many notes at the same time...

 

Dasher

It's all about the music. Really. I just keep telling myself that...

The Soundsmith

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Here's how I do it with a clone (old-model Korg CX-3) which does not have waterfall keys.

 

First of all, have as much overdrive going as you can get with your rig, without distorting too much for the sound you want at the final chord.

 

Secondly, have the Leslie, or sim, going.

 

Thirdly, have a drawbar registration that includes a fair amount of the "harmonic" (black) drawbars pulled at least to 4 or 5 or more.

 

Fourthly, you want to hit as many keys at one time as you possibly can. For me, I do this with my whole hand, and unlike what others have said, I place it at the point where the black keys end on the white keys, so that I'm hitting both black and white keys at once. [i got that trick from someone on this board, although I can't remember who now :D ]

 

If my left hand is free, I use the index finger of my left hand, nail side down, then hit the final chord with my right, which can be positioned ahead of time.

 

If my left hand is busy, I use the "ball", or fat part, of my thumb (really the thumb side of the palm I guess) and drag it up, rolling around to grab the chord at the end.

 

Be sure to start as low as you can on the keybed.

 

Try it, you'll like it! :D

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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I've never really been able to get a good b3 "smear" from my rig. The results on the yamaha s80 were laughable. I had better luck with the korg X5 as controller.

 

On the X5 I drop and roll my entire left forearm up or down the keys, if you can picture that. Sometimes it works ok. I had trouble with palm smears. I have to push the keys down too deep before they will sound. My hand would get stuck if I pressed down too hard. But not hard enough and the notes won't play.

 

Apparently the b3 keys sounded when they just barely touched. Like on Boston "Walk On"; it sounds like sometimes he whips the hand back and forth over the keys over like about an octave before doing a full glissando. The sound is just awesome. I could never do anything remotely close to that.

 

This is actually one of the reasons why I've been hesitating to get the Native B4. I really want to be able to get that "smear" sound. I've wondered about getting a cheap controller keybed that would be more like a real B3. Is there anything like that out there?

 

By the way was Sherinan using a real organ on that last track?

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Here's another person chiming in that never has been able to do a good sounding smear. There are lots of good tips in this thread though that I plan to try out.

 

One song that blew my mind was "People Gotta Move" from Gino Vanelli's Powerful People album. I think it's Joe Vanelli that plays a smear..... on a Rhodes! It sounds really, really cool in the context of the song, but being on a Rhodes, it's probably murder on the hands. :freak:

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Speaking of Gino Vanelli, one of my best friends, Norm Kinney, was the enginer on all the Gino records. I asked him year ago, how did he get that rhodes sound. He said they would run it through a moog parametric eq. to dail in the basic sound. Great sound rhodes on those records. Pre dynomy.......
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I'm only a wannabe keyboard player, but my best results have come from covering as many white keys as I can with the heel, thumb, and pinky of my left hand, and as many black keys as possible with my fingers, and landing with my right. I managed to make a HUGE sound in the right place with my M3 on a song that unfortunately isn't ready to share, or I'd let you hear what it sounds like. The recipe seems to be: lots of notes, lots of Leslie, perhaps a dash of distortion.

"I had to have something, and it wasn't there. I couldn't go down the street and buy it, so I built it."

 

Les Paul

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