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What sounds/samples are Roland, Kurzweil, Korg and Yamaha known for?


jbr

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Q: What sounds/samples are Roland, Kurzweil, Korg and Yamaha known for? For instance, is one better/truer at "piano" than another etc.? Is one better for rock or jazz etc?

 

Thanks for your expertise,

Jim

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I think you can use many synths in many styles, depends on how creative the playres is.

But I'll give my oppinion about the best sounds on every synth:

Roland:, excelent pianos, pads and vintage synth sounds, about the lead sonds I only heard the JD-800 leads and it impressed me very much, but I'm not sure about other models.

 

Korg:, the best lead sounds, have you heard the monster lead on Trinitys and Tritons?,( even my poor iX300 have impressive leads .

The worst piano patches comparing to the other, excelent strings, pads and cool magical sounds.

 

Yamaha:, I'm not very familiar with this company, only played in a old DX7 and it can't be relevant here., but what I hear is that the yamaha's have very good pianos.

 

Kurzweil. The kurzweil piano sound makes me cry, it is so beautifull, ( please hear Jordan Rudess' work ), and the piano/Strings... oh my god!

I think the K2600 is the most powerfull synth avaible now, it has cool lead sounds, the triple strike piano, and very very much.

 

Resuming.

Roland: Pianos and pads/strings.

Korg : Lead sounds, ( the most versatile keyboards )

Kurzweil: Piano, powerfull synth capability.

 

Hope this can help.

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Yamaha(Ex5,Motif):Piano,synbrass,synstrings,guit.,el.bass,good for jazz fusion,pop.

 

Korg(Trinity,Triton):Pads,synbass,pop sounds.

 

Roland(XP,Fantom):Good overall synths specially if you add expansions.

 

Kurzweil(K2500,K2600):Internal sounds are average.Good for pro live applications using samples.Sampling is a way to have original and better sounds than any other keys out there.

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Your best bet is to listen in a store with good headphones. Here is what I'd suggest you listen for, your opinion may vary.

 

Roland sounds are always right in front of you, aggressive and almost larger than life. The soundscape is of putting your face right into the instrument. I suppose the idea is that you can always add reverb if you want the sound to back off. Roland would be my first choice for punchy rock & roll. They also have some excellent orchestral sounds and a very wide range of shimmering synth effects and kickin' percussion.

 

Kurweil is famous for their beautiful, clean, warm, full, realistic piano sounds. Their range of electric piano sounds is also my favorite. They have a great sample library of vintage synths, pop and jazz, and orchestral sounds. The 2000 introduced their VAST (Variable Architecture Synthesizer Technology) approach which lives up to its name, it has virtually unlimited options for tweaking sounds. The 2500 and 2600 each added more great options. Kurweil would be my first choice for all around composing, for unique high-tech sounds and special effects, and for film scoring. They also have an excellent B3 organ setup with the sliders as drawbars.

 

Korg has nice orchestral and pop brass sounds, killer swirling special effects and an overall shiny quality to the sounds.

 

Yamaha has some excellent pianos and electric pianos, very sweet sounding orchestral strings, good choirs and lots of ominous/ethereal effects. Their virtual analog technology is outstanding if you like Prophet 5, stacked & synced oscillators with resonant filters. To me ear, their sounds are a bit dull on their own, but merge beautifully into a mix. They also have some incredible but challenging to play virtual acoustic sounds.

 

Happy listening!

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Everyone that has posted is right on the money.

 

ROLAND-Piano and strings are their string suits. Synths are excellent, too. Basses are plentiful and creative. The older synths have more character to their sounds than the newer stuff, so if you are really looking for a unique texture to add to your sound palette, find a vintage Roland.

 

KORG-On the Trinity and Triton, basses, synths and strings are wonderful as are the motion-type pads and leads. They have a nice depth to the them. I also love the Rhodes patches. Just say NO to the piano patches.

 

KURZWEIL-I haven't heard a better piano on a keyboard. Synth power is almost unrivaled, but they are just too expensive.

 

YAMAHA-To me, they have had nothing spectacular since the SY-77. The Motif sounds good, but it isn't grabbing me like I thought it would. They have good Rhodes and electric keyboard sounds, bass and leads. Strings and so-so and the pianos aren't to my liking.

 

Honorable Mention: NOVATON-The current object of my desire is the Supernova II. Not since I heard the D-50 for the first time have I wanted a synth so bad (I am even considering getting the A-Station to tide me over). The pads are simply wonderful and basses are thicker than J-Lo's old ass :eek: ....

Yamaha (Motif XS7, Motif 6, TX81Z), Korg (R3, Triton-R), Roland (XP-30, D-50, Juno 6, P-330). Novation A Station, Arturia Analog Experience Factory 32

 

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I'll mention one that everyone else left out.

 

E-mu - Samplers are considered warm and full when compaired to Akai. The Proteus series of rack modules are everywhere. The string modules have fallen out of favor as of late now that GigaStudio is in every home but the old Vintage Keys series still gets a lot of use today. The organ and EP sounds hold up well. It seems every hip hop or techno producer has a Mo Phat or Xtream Lead in the rack. I also think the have the best World expansion ROM on the market.

 

Robert

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If the pianos in the A90EX are indicative of Rolands piano sounds in general then I am not a fan of Roland's pianos. I played an A90EX a few weeks ago for a gig and I thought it sucked. The midrange heavy, boomy piano voice might work for solo stuff but it sounded horrible in the mix - and even with EQ I couldn't brighten it up. It was boomy and washed out below middle C, but the 2 octaves above middle C, the volume almost disapeared.

 

For my style of piano playing it just didn't work at all. I don't like a lot of bass or low mid-range in a stage piano because it just competes with and washes out the bass and guitar, but I like to have some volume when I do stabs and runs in my right hand. The A90EX sucked big time.

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Wow!...great info. Thanks. :thu:

 

My main instrument is drums, thus my appreciation for your input. There are so many choices to consider...it's boggles my mind.

 

I rushed into my first synth without considering how it worked or how it sounded. Though I'm a bit familiar with the basic sounds of the Triton and XV-88(green with the inner workings), I'm pondering whether there's a better songwriting tool/tools for me and which direction to go...not for live performance at all. Or maybe I just need to upgrade with additional modules...thus also my interest in the results above. My musical priorities have changed in recent months and so I'm taking inventory, so to speak.. My home studio is based around PTLE.

 

In "Performing Songwriter" magazine, many writers have mentioned the Yamaha PSR series, but I've never heard or seen anyone else talk about them. Are they just toys and used for practicing and learning tools?

 

Jim

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What keyboard do you own? If you are happy with the feel and control of your present keyboard and want more sound then consider modules. If you don't like the sequencer of the keyboard do you have a computer? The Triton and Roland Fantom have very easy to use sequencers. The new E-mu P2500 also has a very easy sequencer but you have to use a USB connection and computer to save your sequences.

 

How many parts/tracks do you normally use when writing? Polyphony may be an issue if you want to use only one single sound source.

 

Do you program in drum parts? As a drummer at hart I hate playing drum parts on keys. I used to use a Roland SP-11 and a Handsonic but now I get more use from my XL-7. I sits next to the computer keyboard and makes it easy to finger-drum in some quick parts with the pads. With the expansion ROM's I consider it the only drum machine on the market that can also cover all my other instrument sounds without having to load samples.

 

Robert

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