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A mint pre-CBS maple neck Oberheim?


Magpel

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Dear old synth hands,

 

Does anyone out there argue or perceive that idenitical synths can exhibit appreaciable and aesthetically different sound qualities?

 

Assuming both are completely or comparably functional, built of identical components, to identical specifications, and in identical environments, can a synth age, evolve or otherwise differentiate itself in desirable ways from its brethren, i.e., can synth players aspire to the serial number fetishism for which guitar players are famous?

 

In my electronically naive mind, it doesn't seem implausible. I've read that the desirbale sound associated with vinatge microphones might be attributable to aging components that age just so. So why not an analogue synth? Why can't an oscillator ease into depth and mellowness? Why can't a filter be broken in?

 

I ask only because I've never run across that point of view. Generally, the prevailing tacit opinion seems to be that a working Mini is a working Mini. And the sancity of "stock" condition doesn't seem to hold much sway in this community.

 

Any thoughts?

 

John, whose evil brother chucked a dimarzio fat strat into the center of my Les Paul Custom, thus screwing it out of vintage value.

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The older analog synths were notorious for sounding different from each other.

 

Also, some of the different rev versions of the prophet 5 sounded different because of a different chip used - some say Rev 1 is still the one that sounds 'warmer', whatever that is.

 

I remember reading somewhere that the jupiter 8 was 'ground breaking' in the sense that it was one of the first analogs to actually be consistent from unit to unit in terms of sounds.

 

My guess would be that after '82 and with digital synths this became a non issue. I don't think pure analogs of today like the omega would exibit this kind of behavior.

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

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Originally posted by Magpel:

Rod, I had no idea! See, this is why one must ask stupid questions.

no stupid questions :) . I'm also curious what other people have to say about this subject.

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

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I think its true. I would swear my mini-moog sometimes had a mind of its own. It would get downright cranky until I would take her in for her periodic cleaning. She was just like a woman, ignore her and you would end up regretting it, and she would act out at the most in-opportune times. ;) nitecrawler
"Time to head down that old Colorado highway pardner."
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Originally posted by Magpel:

See, this is why one must ask stupid questions.

I think you'd be surprised how many people have been wondering the same "stupid" question. :)

 

I've often wondered if electronic components can age in a way that affects the sound. I would think that even microscopic amounts of corrosion and oxidation would affect the current flow. Too much would make it seem to act quirky, but I wonder if just a little would add some sort of character to the sound.

 

Trouble is, no synth has stayed in production long enough to compare an old one to a new one. (Dude, that `83 DX7 is worth so much more than that POS `87! :D ) The Prophet 5 was one example, but that was because different versions of it used different oscillator chips.

 

Any techs out there with a conclusive answer to this? :)

 

Peace all,

Steve

><>

Steve

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A few things to consider when comparing synths of the same make and modle.

 

Parts were frequently created in batches from what electronics were available at the time.

 

Manufactures of base components sometimes changed, or changed the manufacturing process.

 

Allowable variences in the specs of base components can account for change.

 

Mosture absorbed by boards could affect sound. (I forget, is green good or bad?)

 

Very early serial numbers may have been produced by hand rather than as an assembly line process. This may be good or bad, depending if problems were discovered in that early process.

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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