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Who's lucky enough to have their "dream job?"


Intheether

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In know there's a ton of music pros here, whether it be in marketing, engineering, gigging, advertising...

How did you lucky ones break into your field? Hard work, serendipity, contacts, internships... combination of all the above?

And are you in fact doing what you dreamed of, or just happy to be able to work in any facet of the industry? As an outsider, I would love to make my living doing anything with music. I'm afraid that after a certain amount of bad breaks, I'll be resigned to just settle though. How long did it take you all to find your niche, and were there lean times that you sucked it up and did whatever it took to pay the bills?

For anyone you who did 'give up' (for lack of a better term) - what was the proverbial straw that broke your back?

*

 

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I got tired of dealing with musicians, and maybe they got tired of dealing with me. :P

 

Actually, I don't think musicians bother me, it is the struggle to keep a band together and functioning while also trying to pay the bills. So I went back to college, got my degree in computer science, and settled into a job I like. Now I don't worry about paying bills, I can afford the occasional pains of GAS, and can still create music. I lost the feeling of "need to be a star" and instead look forward to putting a complete CD of music up on the net for free. Removing the financial aspects has made music much more enjoyable.

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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Wow, that was a really good response -- insightful.

 

Being a self-made musician and carrying out all the tasks/responsibilities myself is a real big job, but it's not an un-enjoyable one either -- I love it! However the financial expectations are high, but I'm really good with saving the money I earn and really responsible with expenditures. Because there are always future music projects to fund for. Save, save -- save, this is the ultimate key to breaking into a "music dream career". You can't always count on others to do the $$$ work and all that stuff. If you count on 'em -- then you are asking to be ripped off and in the end, loosing a ton.

 

It's about being an entrepreneur all in all. It takes a certain will and devotion to be "different", and a "vision" of sharing something totally unique to people who eventually will understand what you do, and be glad to pay you!

 

I'm happy and settled in comfortably with my music career. It's always a renewing and rejuvinating experience each and every time I step out there into the "public stage". I busk (live street performer)a and the people who pass by pay well! Spare-change goes a long-- long way, next time you see a street performer, respect them and honor them -- they are doing a really "big" thing. To tell you the truth and to give you an idea of how far spare-change goes for me, alittle over two months of busking and I was able to pick up my Roland Fantom and still have $$$ left over for accessories!

 

Dream big and live big, don't settle for just anything if you don't feel right about it. Not enough peoples in this world follow through with their "dreams and desires". Only one life.

 

empress of scorpio,

vi

 

www.mp3.com/just_vi_an

*Musicians have a purpose, only one, that is to inspire other musicians to do the same -- to enchant the world and bring them together as one* --- Vi An

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I'm with ya, Steve...

 

Even a dream job over time gets to be less and less of a dream, and more of a job. Some people hear what you do for a living and go "WOW...COOL", and you're going, "Well, it was for awhile." That's no matter what you do.

 

I've been fortunate in as far as day jobs go, I've worked two of what I would call "dream jobs", one of which I have now. But...it's a job.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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Job? What's that?

 

OH ! Yes, I remember... it should be something like the prison I used to visit daily...

 

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Currently Unemployed, making more music than ever, being extremely happy... until money lasts ...

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Músico, Productor, Ingeniero, Tecnólogo

Senior Product Manager, América Latina y Caribe - PreSonus

at Fender Musical Instruments Company

 

Instagram: guslozada

Facebook: Lozada - Música y Tecnología

 

www.guslozada.com

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i'm 25, married, work in a government carpark, making an average wage. my wife is a school teacher, making some good $. we are still paying off wedding debt, trying to slowly save to get a house. in the meantime i am working on getting an ok demo together to see if some miserable A&R person will be kind to me. i have never been so serious to see my dreams come true.

 

basically, if i'm not gonna be a famous performer, i may as well go and get my bachelor of music degree and teach in a school, or just stay in the carpark and play piano to myself at home. i am taking nothing less than the dreams i have had since i was a kid. i don't want to be a sex god in the pop world, but want to be famous. i will be. it's just a matter of hard work and time. if i won't be, i will give up now and grow a moustache.

 

pray for peace,

kendall

 

p.s. after all that, no, i haven't got my dream job.....yet

"Consider how much coffee you're drinking - it's probably not enough."
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I'm very happy with my life now.

I could almost copy Rabid's text and insert my own data.

I have a good work with a good salary.

I work with hearing aids, which at least is about sound.

I have a house with a separate room for my home studio.

The work gives money to pay what I need and want.

I play the music I want, when I want, and have no interest to be "famous".

 

Maybe it's an "age thing"

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When I was young, my "dream" job was to be a famous recording artist. My plan was to be bigger than the Beatles while I was young and bigger than Stravinsky later in life.

 

As I broke into the record industry, I gradually wound up working for famous recording artists instead. From this vantage point, I decided that fame wasn't such a great thing after all. Fame is a lot like skeet shooting. We send people skyrocketing upwards and then we shoot 'em down! To put it another way: the brighter the spotlight shines on you, the more likely you are to get burned.

 

Now I'm mostly glad that my early dreams didn't happen. My life is actually quite good and in many ways a dream come true! I get to create music for pay in a variety of styles that a recording artist (forced to stick with an identifiable sound) doesn't, because I work with a variety of recording artists. I like being surrounded by peers instead of by employees. When I go for my daily walk, there are no paparazzi to hound me. Instead, I get to focus on my wonderful wife, friends, family, and dog instead of having my career dominate my life. I suppose that I wouldn't mind the "below the radar" fame that jazz artists get, but I have no desire to be on Access Hollywood. ;)

Enthusiasm powers the world.

 

Craig Anderton's Archiving Article

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over time gets to be less and less of a dream, and more of a job.
This is what I've kind of suspected - 'The grass is always greener on the other side'. Of course while I agree with most of you that my original dream was to be a recording artist...as you age and become a lot more realistic you find most musicians can't make a living off of simply recording and touring (not forever anyway). My 'dream' job now, would be one workng in some aspect of the industry, and I know there are so many roads one can take. Believe it or not where I live (smallest state in the country) I am an hour from three pretty big audio/software companies (Bitheads, Motu, Numark). I seem to hit a wall everytime I try to find employment with any of these places. Then I speak to buddies who used to work for guitar center, now working for one of these three and they reply much like Ted that now 'it's just a job'.

I don't mean to be dire, and if I were to never make a penny off of my music, I would still consider it my favorite hobby and true life's work. i just get the feeling that with industry jobs, there's a lot more that goes into finding one than a resume. I mean how do you even get employemnt with Alesis, tascam, Emagic, recording studios...jobs I know many of you forum members hold? Do you have engineering degrees, marketing degrees computer science? I think although, you may consider it 'just a job', if you weigh the alternatives, you are pretty psyched - I know I'd be.

Sorry for the rambling...thanks for your responses! ~nel

*

 

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Originally posted by nelz:

over time gets to be less and less of a dream, and more of a job.
This is what I've kind of suspected - 'The grass is always greener on the other side'. Of course while I agree with most of you that my original dream was to be a recording artist...as you age and become a lot more realistic you find most musicians can't make a living off of simply recording and touring (not forever anyway). My 'dream' job now, would be one workng in some aspect of the industry, and I know there are so many roads one can take. Believe it or not where I live (smallest state in the country) I am an hour from three pretty big audio/software companies (Bitheads, Motu, Numark). I seem to hit a wall everytime I try to find employment with any of these places. Then I speak to buddies who used to work for guitar center, now working for one of these three and they reply much like Ted that now 'it's just a job'.

I don't mean to be dire, and if I were to never make a penny off of my music, I would still consider it my favorite hobby and true life's work. i just get the feeling that with industry jobs, there's a lot more that goes into finding one than a resume. I mean how do you even get employemnt with Alesis, tascam, Emagic, recording studios...jobs I know many of you forum members hold? Do you have engineering degrees, marketing degrees computer science? I think although, you may consider it 'just a job', if you weigh the alternatives, you are pretty psyched - I know I'd be.

Sorry for the rambling...thanks for your responses! ~nel

Nel - you ask a good, honest question...

 

As you know, I'm doing what I think your dream job is - and although it's never, ever been easy, I consider myself very fortunate.

 

To answer your questions specifically...

 

-re relationships with manufacturers - most people seem to get hooked up going from working in music stores, standing out for doing a great job and schmoozing with the reps as they visit...learning about the gear....and then, when the time is right, moving to a manufacturer who makes gear they like. My relationships with manufacturers (Kawai, Roland, Yamaha, and of course Alesis) came about in a different way - for the most part, they knew of my playing and I knew them through my relationships with them in various aspects of the industry. Stay visible - if you don't stand out, they won't hear about you.

 

My record label and albums came about through hard work and perserverence, and my fan base has come from playing out A LOT and continuing to learn and grow as a musician. And no, I don't have a degree in music (I was pre-law and got a degree in Speech Communication, which actually helped me immensely)...but I imagine a degree in anything related wouldn't hurt.

 

I completely make my living from performing and selling albums (and my videos), and I will tell you that it's always been a challenge (and more so in these days post-mp3), but I have never regretted my decisions, and if it were to end tomorrow, I would be very proud of the products I've put out and the things I've been able to accomplish.

 

Keep your dream going, Nel, keep learning (and saving money, as we talked about), be careful and conservative in your decisions, stay focused, and finally, don't forget to thank people along the way for the help they've given you. No one does this alone...and your success will be at least partially due to help you receive from friends and supporters.

 

Wishing you everything you want...from your friend in music.

 

lz

www.lauriez.com

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I earn my living by making music, so I could say I have it. Of course it's not so simple. A few comments:

 

- I've played almost all possible roles: Pianist, composer, keyboardist, programmer, arranger, music director, teacher (piano, keyboards, improvisation, harmony, music history), music consultant, music instructor for actors, you name it. And, many different kinds of music! I find it a very good thing. I would be unhappy doing just one thing - and of course, being able to do many things helps you to survive.

 

- I *couldn't* do something else. I would go crazy in a week - I tried a couple of times. And anyway, music is what I did make, study and practice all my life... I wouldn't like to learn another job!

 

- Being a musician is a crazy life. Monstruos insecurity. Unpredictable hours. Mad deadlines. Dealing with all sorts of people. BUT. People with "normal" jobs complain about those same things! At least, I'm doing what I like.

 

- I love to perform... No, I *need* it! It's a drive you have, and develop. And it can only be developed by doing it, over and over. There is nothing like it!

 

- I would LOVE to have a little more money in my bank account. That would simplify my life in many ways. But you know what... There is only one life. You make choices - you decide what's important, enjoy your choices, and pay the prices.

 

Carlo

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