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Musicians, be prepared! It will get you!


Robert Smedberg

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I work as a seller for hearing aids and visit my regular customers.

Sooo...

 

Last week I visited an audiologist and did an audiogram.

I did it just for fun and to know how my hearing is.

 

I still have hearing in the normal range but I have a "dip" in 3-6kHz. As one can see in persons with "noise damage"

 

I will probably need hearing aids when I get older or get used to say: -Sorry, can you repeat that.

 

I have had my times of loud tinnitus, for days sometimes.

All because of music.

I started to wear ear-plugs only three years ago, but the damage was allready done.

 

Is there something positive about this?

 

Yes, I can have my hearing aids for free from my own company. :D

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Robert, please get in touch with me.

 

We have planned for a nation-wide project regarding tinnitus among amateur musicians. A lot is done already, but there is still many things to consider and perhaps your knowledge and connections could be of good use.

 

My phone number at the office is 016-15 93 25. (In meeting all day tomorrow but on wednesday I'm available all day after 10.30)

http://www.lexam.net/peter/carnut/man.gif

What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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Huh? Come again?

 

There are three types of us audio folk who are more susceptible to this than others:

 

a. Those who use headphones extensively and at high volume.

 

b. Those of us who practiced in garage bands with cymbals crashing a few feet from our ears and cement walls reflecting those sounds.

 

c. Those of us who mix loud or maintain ridiculously high volumes on stage.

 

I fear deafness and severe tinnitus the way some people fear anthrax exposure. It would be life-ending for me, since I don't want to live if I can't hear.

 

- Jeff

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Same here. First years of playing drums. Then a period of standing next to the drum set with an EV 18" 3 way cabnet blasting synth parts so I could hear over the drummer. Hearing loss is my biggest fear. I have the same ringing in the ears and trouble hearing phone conversations.

 

EVERY STAGE MUSICIAN SHOULD WEAR EARPLUGS!!!

 

(Hey Jeff the Tascam guy. Check your profile for a message.)

 

(For those that sent me private messages. I just discovered them so I will be replying as work permits.)

This post edited for speling.
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Originally posted by mats.olsson@rockfile.se:

Robert, please get in touch with me.

 

We have planned for a nation-wide project regarding tinnitus among amateur musicians. A lot is done already, but there is still many things to consider and perhaps your knowledge and connections could be of good use.

 

My phone number at the office is 016-15 93 25. (In meeting all day tomorrow but on wednesday I'm available all day after 10.30)

 

I'll do that.

I'm going to Eskilstuna tomorrow morning, for a quick visit, but I'll call you on wednesday.

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An ear is a terrible thing to waste. Isn't it ironic that the people who need them the most and who've spent the most time developing them are the ones who wear them out most quickly? Why can's ears be like muscles - the more you use 'em, the stronger they get?
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Originally posted by Sweat:

My personal in-ear monitors are the most important piece of gear I own.

 

OK - I'm moving a little off-topic here, but I think in-ears are a relatively new deal and deserve some discussion. I have been thinking about NOT buying that Voce V5 and buying in-ears instead. I've talked with my most trusted salesperson and he recommends the Shure system (NOT the NADY). However, I'm concerned that he might be viewing it from a singers perspective. I'd like to hear from keyboard players...

 

1. What kind of in-ears are keyboardists out there using?

2. What criteria have you used?


  •  
  • Freq Response
  • Comfort
  • External noise/music rejection
  • Stereo/Mono/Number of "inputs"
  • Gotchas
     

 

 

Anything else in your list of criteria?

 

Feel free to reply via email as well.

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hey,i know what you mean. i was running stage and effects lights for a heavy emo band friday and forgot to wear my plugs. after being next to the drums for two hours,my ears were ringing for two days. guys- beware we all will be deaf soon if we dont watch (listen) out!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(:(
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i have been wearing earplugs for about 4 years now. i'll never go back. i started off wearing these things called earplanes - they're for when you fly, to stop you getting sore ears. they do reduce the volume a bit. but then i got some EAR earplugs - very good. i never play without them, even at rehearsals. people on stage complain that my amp is too loud, but it also makes your sound actually sound better. they take a little while to get used to, but they're great. my next step is in-ear monitors.

 

have you ever been on stage when it's that loud you think you're gonna faint? that's a very scary feeling. :eek:

 

pray for peace,

k

"Consider how much coffee you're drinking - it's probably not enough."
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Originally posted by jimbyjoe:

have you ever been on stage when it's that loud you think you're gonna faint? that's a very scary feeling. :eek:

 

I have.

Please can you tell me what EAR earplugs are? Are they made for musicians? Are they an American product, or maybe Australian? Maybe you have an address or website? I'm interested!

Thank you

 

Carlo

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from an old fart ..

 

when I first started out even PRACTICING drum s in my bedroom, I stuffed toilet papter in my ears ( mid '50s )

 

when I started working in college with rock house organ/tenor/ gtr/ drums ball to the wall stuff ..seated between a pair of Leslies with mu unamlpfied kit ..I switched to Cotton plugs ( with vasoline ) ...

 

when I spent the bulk of the rest of my career ( 35+ yrs) as a composer/arranger /producer working in recording studios, I would NOT let the sound levels get outta control .. loud for recording to catch glitches .. the WAY SOFTER .for mixing .. to preserve my hearing as much as possible ...

 

and I still wound up with tintinnuitis (sp?) ...

 

the only thing I can blame it on is ten years playing with a loud cue system and a click in my ear ...

 

(ringing away as I type this ....)

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marino,

 

you should be able to get those EAR earplugs from a good music store. they are us made. the older style are white and grey and the new ones are yellow plugs and purple tips. looky there - i just found the web site:

 

 

Ear Plugs

 

hope this helps. i've been using these for about 3-4 years and they are great.

of course, if you can't get your hands on them immediately, go for a pair of foam squishy ones. there's heaps behind me here at work! (most hardware shops stock the foam ones)

 

pray for peace,

k

"Consider how much coffee you're drinking - it's probably not enough."
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Originally posted by dansouth@yahoo.com:

 

On of my friends has a bad case of Tintinitus. He got it from reading too many French comic books. ;)

 

Ouch, Dan.

 

Lemme get this straight...you actually thought about this joke, and still decided to post it?

 

:eek:

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

 

Affiliations: Cloud Microphones • Music Player Network 

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Thanks jimbyjoe for the link and the info. I am on big loud stages at times, and I am already familiar with "regular" earplugs. I had heard that there were ones made for musician - I guess they attempt to block all frequences in the same way, so you can still hear all the music, only softer. They should be the ones.

 

Carlo

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Originally posted by dansouth@yahoo.com:

 

On of my friends has a bad case of Tintinitus. He got it from reading too many French comic books. ;)

 

ROTFLMAO!!!

 

 

Marino,

 

Do a search for "Elacin" on the web and you'll find a product called ER 15/25 from them.

That is a custom made protection for musicians.

One of the best.

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Originally posted by marino:

Thanks jimbyjoe for the link and the info. I am on big loud stages at times, and I am already familiar with "regular" earplugs. I had heard that there were ones made for musician - I guess they attempt to block all frequences in the same way, so you can still hear all the music, only softer. They should be the ones.

 

Carlo

 

Marino: The link and plugs jimbyjoe suggested

are nice, but they aren't the "musicians" earplugs

you're thinking of...

"Musicians" earplugs reduce all frequencies equally.

They're great... you don't get that "under-water"

sound/feeling when you wear them.

These must be custom fit for you. They run

about $150 per pair.

The only place I know of that makes them

is here:

 

http://www.houseearclinic.com/

 

Give them a buzz.. they may know

of a place in your area that makes

these.

 

Best of luck!

Valky

Valkyrie Sound:

http://www.vsoundinc.com

Now at TSUTAYA USA:

http://www.tsutayausa.com

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Tinnitus. not fun stuff. i got it by working close to a drying unit in a car wash when i was younger. I now will not approach amplified concerts without my good old sonic noise filters (the orange ones). A side benefit is they cut out a lot of distortion too.

How did everything get so damned loud? There are times when I almost had to tell them to turn down volume in a movie theater. I was in a small coffee shop and a guy had a huge amp with a acoustic guitar.

Not to sound like an ole' fuddy duddy; but are we going to have to fight to keep our hearing? Quiet or resonable sound volume seems to be dissapearing.

Michael :(

Q:What do you call a truck with nothing in the bed,nothing on the hitch, and room for more than three people in the cab? A:"A car"....
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Ahhh yes, the dreaded "4K Notch". Still can't bring myself to wear the damn earplugs though.

 

 

Originally posted by Robert Smedberg:

Last week I visited an audiologist and did an audiogram.

I did it just for fun and to know how my hearing is.

 

I still have hearing in the normal range but I have a "dip" in 3-6kHz. As one can see in persons with "noise damage"

I used to think I was Libertarian. Until I saw their platform; now I know I'm no more Libertarian than I am RepubliCrat or neoCON or Liberal or Socialist.

 

This ain't no track meet; this is football.

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Originally posted by PatAzz:

 

OK - I'm moving a little off-topic here, but I think in-ears are a relatively new deal and deserve some discussion. I have been thinking about NOT buying that Voce V5 and buying in-ears instead. I've talked with my most trusted salesperson and he recommends the Shure system (NOT the NADY). However, I'm concerned that he might be viewing it from a singers perspective. I'd like to hear from keyboard players...

 

1. What kind of in-ears are keyboardists out there using?

2. What criteria have you used?


  •  
  • Freq Response
  • Comfort
  • External noise/music rejection
  • Stereo/Mono/Number of "inputs"
  • Gotchas
     

 

 

Anything else in your list of criteria?

 

Feel free to reply via email as well.

 

Besides myself, I know only a couple of musicians in my local area using in-ear monitors. Perhaps it's because they're still sort of expensive, although folks like Shure and Nady have tried to tap that bugeted market.

 

Mounted in my keyboard module rack, I've had the Shure system for two years now and it has been well worth it since my live band is so damn blisteringly loud on stage. I adjust my own mix perfectly, and at much lower levels. But most importantly... No more ringing ears after the gig!

Lenny
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Thanks a lot Robert, Valky and Jimbyjoe for your tips. I will search for the best solution...

 

Originally posted by valkyriesound:

These must be custom fit for you. They run

about $150 per pair.

Valky

 

Ouch... I guess they are made to last. :)

BTW Valky, I seem to remember a picture of your band, you were surrounded by, like, 30 trombones...

"Acoustic" music can get loud, too!! :D

 

Carlo

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Originally posted by marino:

Valky, I seem to remember a picture of your band, you were surrounded by, like, 30 trombones...

 

Oh no, please don't get her started on the T-bone subject again!

 

;)

 

/Mats

http://www.lexam.net/peter/carnut/man.gif

What do we want? Procrastination!

When do we want it? Later!

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Thanks guys for letting me know what ear plugs to get for ALL frequencies............. I'll test them out when the wife starts yelling at me at home. :D

 

A friend of mine many years ago used a sound level meter to check the amount of db's, on the "A" scale, that our band was playing at. We were high.

 

OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Association)has a guideline to follow for overexposure for sound pressure levels. The higher the level the shorter the time for this exposure is allowed in the work place.

 

What.............did you say something?...........

 

My fade out........

 

Jazzman :cool:

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