Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

has anybody played a young-chang piano before?


surfjazz

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

OK, everyone has opinions on pianos that border on religious (hope I'm not starting anything here). I looked at pianos for about 18 months and finally bought one a year ago that I'm happy with (Yamaha). I really wanted a Steinway B, but I also want my kids to go to college http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/wink.gif (and I knew I wouldn't be able to play it enough to REALLY appreciate the difference).

 

OK, IMO YC's are a little thin and bright and the action was not as "positive" as some others. They also vary more than some brands (like Yamaha) but not nearly as much as the European style (i.e., Estonia) or Steinway. In the end I opted for a Yamaha and am EXTREMELY happy with it I even bought it mail order and it wasn't that much more than some of the Chinese or Korean pianos. The more recent Yamahas are now darker than before and the keys have a great feel (Ivorite) that is better than the usual plastic composite. Unfortunately they are more expensive than YC, so budget is a consideration. That said, resale % is higher as well.

 

That said, Young-Chang is very popular, much better than they used to be, and not only makes pianos under their own name, but manufactures them for others. Pramberger is one (from their marketing materials Pramberger was a Steinway engineer who left and designed pianos made by YC). I've noticed that these "private" brands are not as dissimilar to the YC as people would like to think - though I saw a Pramberger with the most spectacular case of any piano I've ever seen (some type of african wood with black ebony trim and inlays... beautiful).

 

Just a word to the wise - In buying a piano, everything is negotiable so DON'T PAY LIST PRICE!!! (I know someone who paid almost list on a Steinway and then was charged to DOWNGRADE from the artist bench to a standard bench... jeeez).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the sound of the Young Chang for popular music, but they do tend to be a little brighter than some, and with a slightly heavier, "dampened" action.

 

Best piano I ever sat at was a Yamaha C9... Amazing power, clarity and feel.

 

------------------

Cheers!

 

Phil "Llarion: The Jazzinator" Traynor

www.mp3.com/llarion

Smooth Jazz

Cheers!

 

Phil "Llarion: The Jazzinator" Traynor

www.llarion.com

Smooth Jazz

- QUESTION AUTHORITY. Go ahead, ask me anything.

http://www.llarion.com/images/dichotomybanner.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I worked for several years as a piano tuner/technician, and developed lots of opinions about pianos. First, there's no accounting for personal taste. Some people like a dark, mellow sound; others prefer bright and punchy. Also, you can't always rely on brand name; -- I've played some wonderful Steinways and some that were absolutely terrible; there are exceptions to everything. That said, we can make some generalizations about brands: when Young Chang first came to this country they were pretty bad. The workmanship was poor, sound was very inconsistent, action problems, etc. They've improved a lot. It still isn't a "great" instrument, but it's pretty fair for the money. You'll pay a lot more for a Steinway, Baldwin, Schimmel, etc., and these will probably hold up better in the long run. Baldwin used to be considered a world-class piano, but it's been quite a few years since they've built anything that sounds good to my ears. In my experience Yamaha has consistently been a good performer. They arrive from the factory in tune, with little or no tweaking needed to make them presentable for the showroom floor. That's no small feat; most other brands arrive way out of tune, sometimes out of regulation, with squeaks, rattles, and sticking keys. It reflects upon their craftsmanship. I personally like the Yamaha sound, though it's too bright for some folks' taste. Listen for the solid, gutsy power of the low tenor register. The others just wither and sound ambiguous from middle C down an octave or two. BUT- Yamahas tend to be weak in the bass and downright shrill in the upper treble, so play several different pianos and decide what you like. Consider another point: any given brand's concert grand may be a terrific piano, but the smaller models in the line are another matter. Some of the "great" brands have super 9' models, and built their reputations on them, but their 5'10" to 7'pianos don't use the same action or have the same character of sound. There's no substitute for longer strings and larger soundboard. In general, you should get the biggest piano you can afford. Best wishes!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quoted by Ottodog: <<<<>>>>

 

I agree with this statement on most Baldwin models, but in my opinion, Baldwin does still build a great 9 foot concert grand piano....the "SD10" model. It compares very nicely to any concert grand piano. It is the piano I have in my studio.

 

I also like a Steinway Model D and Bosendorfer Imperial, in addition to the Baldwin SD10, but I cannot say one is better than the other. Each of these pianos have their own character of sound, which is very wonderful and unique.

 

Kip

Bardstown Audio

www.bardstownaudio.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Bardstown. I agree that the SD-10 was, and maybe still is a great piano. It's just that the newer ones I've encountered in the last few years have been really disappointing. But, of course, pianos vary even within the same make and model -- each one is unique. Incidently, the Baldwin people were talking (back in the days before the current bankruptcy)about the new SD-11, the replacement for the SD-10. Supposedly some of them were built, but I don't know anyone who's ever seen or played one.

 

I agree with you on your other points, too. The Bosendorfer Imperial is a super piano, as is the Steinway D,usually, although I played one years ago that was just dreadful. I've only played one Imperial, and it was really nice; I remember it being very loud! (BIG soundboard, for one thing)

 

Have you ever seen a Bosendorfer upright? I tuned one a few years ago and it was tremendous. It was one of the most satisfying pianos I've ever played. I don't recall the model number, but I remember that the number reflected the height in centimeters, similar to Steinway's K-52 (52 inches tall). I'm not enough of a pianist to feel handicapped by the action's being upright instead of grand; in fact I learned and still play on a vertical piano, so the upright action feels "normal" to me.

 

It's mainly the sound rather than the action that impresses me about a piano, and that vertical Bose sounded really nice. Wish I could replace my lousy little piano at home with one. It also seems like it would be a good choice for a studio, in terms of taking up less space than a large grand.

 

Enjoy your SD-10 -- I wish I had one of those, too!

 

Regards,

Otto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...