Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Volume pedals


mte

Recommended Posts

Hey!

I have a Korg M1 keyboard and I'd like tu buy some pedals for it. I already have a sustain pedal. Now i'd like to buy another 2 sustain pedals (rather then switches, just not to step on it twice when necessary) to change between programs and finally 2 volume pedals (1 for volume, 1 for effect balance control). BUT it would be kinda silly to have more equipment than there are the input holes at the back of the keyboard, don't you think? So what do I need most? I play mostly rock music in a band. Or would it be better to have all the things as I mentioned before and change them when necessary anyway?

Huh, at first I wanted to ask something else: Are the volume pedals all kinda the same (e.g. if I buy a yamaha pedal, would it work on my Korg?) How do they actually work (if the input is stereo)? Well any info on the pedals or some url would be very helpful.

Thanks in advance,

Matej

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 9
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Yeah, it would be kinda weird to buy all of that and not be able to hook it all up at once........ If you're looking to get all that stuff, (you obviously want a lot of control) then you might do better with a midi foot controller.

http://zzounds.com/love.music?p=p.DGTCONT8&z=1030208821974

http://zzounds.com/love.music?p=p.YAMMFC10&z=1030208821974

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/ex/shop/home/010405145733024004254165713623?pid=180506

 

All of those have expression pedals and numerous footswitches which can be set to any midi control change message. Then you could also use the inputs on your M1 to do the stuff that you can't control via midi.

 

 

Another alternative that would free up an input on your M1 would be to get an in-line volume pedal........ all you do is plug your output into the pedal and then take another cord and run it from the pedal to your amp, mixer, whatever. Here's an in-line pedal........ http://www.musiciansfriend.com/ex/shop/home/010405145733024004254165713623?pid=151317

 

Hope this helps

 

------------------

John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son; that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm inclined to lean more towards KeyboardFreak's second suggestion. Since it's a live application, doing it through MIDI isn't necessarily more advantageous; plus, the MIDI route would certainly cost you more, and be a mild pain to program as well.

 

I don't remember what the M1's back panel looks like, but if it only has one input for a continuous control (volume style) pedal. and that jack is assignable, then the Actual Audio Volume Pedal would probably be the way to go. Then, you can use the cc jack for whatever other trick you wanna do (assuming that the M1 allows you to assign whatever function that you want to control to the cc pedal jack).

 

BTW, a Yamaha cc pedal should work fine on a Korg synth, if I remember correctly.

 

Hope that helps,

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It took me a while to figure this stuff out too, but here's what I know:

 

There are basically two kinds of expression pedals: volume pedals and Control Voltage pedals. It's easy to tell the two apart: the first has a bunch of jacks, and the second has a cord attached to it. You use a volume pedal to change the audio signal by boosting or cutting it, while you use a control-voltage pedal to alter parameters in a synthesizer, such as filter cutoff or pitch.

 

For keyboardists, the best volume pedal is the Rolls/RFX 402. It's dirt cheap, but works in stereo and can be switched to become a panner pedal as well. $35 @ Zzounds . The more expensive volume pedals are called "active" pedals because they amplify the signal rather than cutting it. This is necessary for bass players, but not for keyboardists as our signal is already hot.

 

For control voltage pedals, they do differ by manufacturer based on the type of potentiometer that is inside. A Yamaha FC7 pedal uses a 10k pot, but it's an exponential one, whereas the Roland EV5 is a 10k linear. Nearly every manufacturer has their own Control Voltage pedal (Kurzweil's is CC-1, but I can't remember Korg's), but they're not usually carried at your local store. It's very important that you know which type you need (check your manual) before you get one, as they do not all come down to two categories as they do for footswitches.

 

 

If you find yourself wanting to have more pedals than your keyboard allows you to input, there are a couple of little boxes made by Midi Solutions that will change a pedal into a midi signal that the keyboard will recognize. The footswitch controller will change a footswitch into things like program up or start/stop. The pedal controller will take a Contrl Voltage pedal (in this case any one will do) and change it to any Midi controller, aftertouch, pitch bend, or even sysex messages. You may be able to use the CV output from the afore-mentioned RFX pedal to drive this box as well.

 

 

I'd go into the different kinds of pedal switches too.. but it's getting late and this is already quite long. I hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Korg model expression pedal is XVP-10. It is a combination Control Voltage (korg calls it "expression") and volume pedal, but it's a pretty expensive beast at $140. Roland makes a similar model called the EV-7, whereas EV-5 is the expression only version. The RFX 402 pedal I mentioned before also does both volume and expression, but not both at once.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For control voltage pedals, they do differ by manufacturer based on the type of potentiometer that is inside. A Yamaha FC7 pedal uses a 10k pot, but it's an exponential one, whereas the Roland EV5 is a 10k linear.

 

Unless I'm mistaken, the EV5 differs from the FC7 in that it has a dial on the side of it that let's you scale how much its throw affects the signal. Nice feature.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless I'm mistaken, the EV5 differs from the FC7 in that it has a dial on the side of it that let's you scale how much its throw affects the signal. Nice feature

 

Yeah, that too.. but the FC-7 also has the "Fortissimo" function where the pedal's normal down position is something like 120/128 and then you can push forward just a tad more. It also has an easy system for ganging them together and it's almost half the price of the Roland. Unfortunately, they're just not competitors because they don't work for the same keyboards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For whats it's worth -- --

 

I have both a Yamaha FC-7 and Roland EV-5. I use the FC-7 on my 01-W for effects modulation (wonderful for a Wah pedal) but it was no good as a volume. The EV-5 works better as a volume, I have it on my VK-7 and it's great.

 

They certainly have different characteristics ( the Yammie is better built and has the "overdrive" feature (if you press it hard past horizontal you get a bit more oomph). As mentioned previously the Roland pedals have an adjustment for the volume floor.

 

also, is it just me or do none of these volume pedals actually take the volume down to nothing?

 

Frosty

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stay away from Roland volume pedals - complete garbage.

 

I have in the past bought two of them, and each one had the internal gear/control assembly break within 2 months.

 

They may be OK for very light home use, if you take off your shoes and be very dainty about using them, but for live applications, they can't stand up to any kind of even moderately hard use... JUNK!

 

You want to look for a volume pedal with metal gear assemblies, or at least very hard plastic. Don't be afraid to ask for a screwdriver to open it up at the store to take a look before you buy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey,

Thank you guys for all the replies. Well I decided tu buy an expression pedal. We'll I got one used for 20% of the original exp-2 pedal price, all working normally (it's not the original though). But - how to set the minimum volume when in expression mode? The button works only if I use it between keyboard's output and amp's input... Any idea?

Thanks,

Matej

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...