Jump to content
Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

The SYSTEM approach vs. the SYNTH approach...Your thoughts?


Wiggum

Recommended Posts

Hey all,

 

Here I am in the throes of one of my biggest purchasing decisions over the last few years (Kurz K2600X), and I'm really struggling with a fundamental question.

 

Logic tells me that it would be wise to take a set amount of money and decide what pieces of gear will provide the most inspiration and the best finished product. Unfortunately, logic has nothing to do with musicians and gear...

 

I currently play a Korg Wavestation EX, a Roland D20, and I have a strong Cubase VST system with various virtual synths. I admittedly over-bought on the DAW, and I'm trying not to repeat that mistake. I now find myself with a wonderful tape recorder, and very little gear to record.

 

This recent Kurzweil deal has me torn. The K2600X has my favorite action, two slick ribbons, and a much needed bank of programmable sliders. It also has flexible filters, a good soundset, and a decent LCD. What bothers me is the added investment out of the box (CD-ROM drives, sample CD's, hard drives, etc). I just don't see myself pursuing this route in the age of soft samplers (HALion) and virtual insruments. In essence, I would be paying $3,295 for a good MIDI controller and some decent sounds.

 

At the same time, it's only $3,295! This seems like a once in a lifetime opportunity for a guy like me, and logical thinking flies out the window.

 

To get back to my question, if I purchase the K2600X, it will inevitably limit my opportunities to buy other gear and software. I really want Wavelab, Reason, HALion, and some other packages, and I just feel that much of the K2600X will eventually go unused. Why waste my time with MIDI and SCSI sample dumps when I can load Gigabyte-sized banks in seconds (and with my existing computer hardware)? Why fuss with a 64x240 LCD when I have a 22" monitor?

 

I just can't find the middle ground. If Yamaha improved the action of the S80, I wouldn't be typing this. If Kurzweil improved the programmability of the PC2X (and provided a larger LCD) I would follow that route. Neither of these options is likely to happen.

 

Any thoughts? Is the K2600X deal truly a once in a lifetime buy, or has this instrument grown long in the tooth?

 

All the best,

 

Wiggum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 23
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Is the K2600X deal truly a once in a lifetime buy, or has this instrument grown long in the tooth?

 

A great axe is always a great axe, and will always be a great axe. The K2600 is a deeply great axe. It could be safely argued that it ranks among the most powerful synths ever.

 

The processing power of the VAST engine isn't outdated at all. In the almost 10 years since it's release in the original K2000, no manufacturer has come close to touching this operating system in terms of flexibility and power; and, the Kurzweil folks have definitely kept their promise and continued to update it and provide enhancements for it. I can quote spec after spec on the stuff that put the VAST engine in a different class than the majority of other synths currently available (what is it...17 different filters to choose from, right? Up to four "oscillators" in a single voice...I could waaay go on), but all of that has been pretty well documented over the years and is readily available in a variety of forms.

 

It can be reasonably argued that the original ROM set is a bit long in the tooth, but that's kind of a joke when you consider the myriad of sonic options available that you can feed this thing, from the volumes of amazing programs written by some of the best programmers in the industry to huge sample sets collected over the years...oh, yes, and it reads almost every sample format available. Additionally, the processing power of the synth is much more responsible for the quality and playability of the sounds than the ROM...factory ROM sets are comprised of short little samples that would amaze you by how lifeless they sound if you hear them stripped of their engines...even in the latest synths.

 

The current price of this synth is a totally great deal, IMO. If you want to talk about an investment - something that you will definitely use for years, something that can grow with you, and that you can continue to discover new and cool things on years after you've purchased it, then go get that bad boy. You won't regret it.

 

I know...I need to learn how to say what I really feel... http://cwm.ragesofsanity.com/s/net7/coolbrows.gif

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wiggum,

 

I really feel your pain. If I were not buying something rather expensive right now, I would basically be in the same situation as you. My logic tells me that for any sampling needs, Gigastudio will be good for a while and I could probably live with my PC88's action at home, but if not I'd probably buy a Roland RD600 that is undoubtedly going to be closed out shortly as the #700 is on its way. I would add to it the Oberheim MC3000D fader box/master controller brain unit which is on sale for 299 pounds/ approx. $450 Even the PC2 at its new price ($1900 instead of $2500) is attractive, since you can add the long ribbon for only $50 instead of paying $400 for an ExpressionMate.

 

But the more I evaluate the so-called "logical" way of going, I realize how many potential problems it induces.. just having so many separate pieces of gear invites more kinks and bothers, and while it might be a good value, it won't behave together as an instrument. That's what's amazing about the K2600. It's not just a bundle of technologies, it's an instrument. It responds to you and it grows with you and you grow with it. And while hardware sampling may be increasingly outdated, I don't think that the 2600 is something that will seem old, or unuseful in 5 or even 10 years. Its feature set is absolutely massive, from synthesis to sampling to effects processing and vocoding.

 

I have to say that it's a good idea to get away from the computer sometimes. The Kurzweil enbables you to get away from the computer forever, but that's not necessarily what I'm advocating. The reason is this: above all else, I am an improviser. To improvise, you need an instrument, not a tool. You need something that responds to your creativity, and having separate components or gear that is not quite up to the right standards can really get in the way of the creative process. (I'm sensing strong Freff influence in this passage.)

 

One more thing: when your think logically and with your checkbook in mind, you often forget the value of your own time. If going with separate components or saving money by not buying the best ends up making you spend lots of tiem aggravating through manuals or just feeling bvlocked creatively, then the money you saved will disappear through the time that you waste. In that respect, the Kurzweil saves you money: once you learn it, you don't have a bunch more options to get annoyed at.

 

 

I would go with the Kurzweil because in the end it will serve you better and contribute to your creative process instead of taking away from it.

 

-Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As dave wrote, the Kurz is a wonderful piece.

I have one K2000 and one K2500 and are as happy as can be.

Well, a K2600 would make me even happier.

My main focus when playing is to have my own sounds and not stick to massproduced factory programs or widely used CD-roms that you can hear on a lot of CD's. I find that boring and the Kurz (VAST) is the top of the line when it comes to alternate/tweak the original waves.

 

If this isn't a concern for you you might be better of with another synth, it's not so easy to understand VAST cos' it's very vast. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

 

------------------

--Smedis,--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gee thanks guys. I don't think I could have said any of this better myself.

 

Take Care, :-)

 

 

------------------

Mike Martin

Kurzrep@aol.com

Kurzweil Music Systems

www.kurzweilconnection.com

-Mike Martin

 

Casio

Mike Martin Photography Instagram Facebook

The Big Picture Photography Forum on Music Player Network

 

The opinions I post here are my own and do not represent the company I work for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hear what you guys are saying, but I still think I need to strongly consider the system as a whole. I don't play live, so this is strictly a studio setting.

 

While I agree that the K2600X is a good instument, my point is that I might be able to produce a better finished product with a more rounded purchase. Perhaps a Yamaha S80 (despite the action), Steinberg's Wavelab, HALion, and Propellerhead's Reason. Once HALion (or a similar app) is available, I just don't see myself using the Kurz's sampling engine anymore. I just can't afford the cost of the added extras (CD-ROM drives, hard drives, etc).

 

A bigger issue is the complexity of the instrument. With my schedule, I have a limited time available to play, program, and compose. I just don't know if I can donate the time required to master a Kurz. It's not that I'm a preset player (I'm not), but it's just much easier for me to get unique sounds with simpler instruments (NI's Pro-5 for instance).

 

I recently found a ton of free Wavestation patches, and with my virtual analogs, I feel quite covered in the synth department. What I need is a good 88-key action with good bread and butter sounds (strings, timpanis, brass, PIANO, etc). I know about the PC2X, but as I said before, the lack of programmability really turns me off. If it had a filter envelope and some other basic parameters, I might consider it.

 

I guess I'm just frustrated because of the limited time I have to make this decision. Soon the K2600 will go back into the stratosphere, and I need to decide whether this is a wise investment. I will never use the sequencer and many of the advanced features, so I really question the value.

 

All the best,

 

Wiggum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wiggum,

 

Your last post reminds me of something I said in a forum about a month ago, when the last 2500's were being closed out. I think the Kurzweil could be a money pit: between CDRom drives and sample libraries, P-Ram expansions and upcoming ROM boards, there is so much potential for it to push itself into the stratosphere even if the base price is cheap.

 

So I agree with you there. If it's studio use, then you're certainly not going to become a Jordan Ruddess with that board between projects. I think that a Software sampler is probably easier to work with in a studio setup too, since you can easily shuttle samples from your Cubase tracks right into the sampler off the same drive, not to mention tweaking the softsynth with the same exact effects you're running on the audio tracks so the mix is consistent.

 

If the S80's action is bothering you, why not just go for a Kawai MP9000, or even a Roland RD600 since those are being closed out soon: that way you'll always have piano and e.p.'s covered, and your fingers will be consistently happy. and while the sound module market isn't as booming as it used to be, there are certainly plenty of Emu's and the new Roland XV's are fabulous. Plus I think it's easier to justify buying a new Yamaha FS1R for new strange sounds than buying two, maybe three sample CD sets for the Kurzweil, as the hardware is really something brand new, not just an upgrade, and it's nice to fill up that rack http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/tongue.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/tongue.gif (I'm sure dB agrees with that since he owns that limited edition Koa rack filler)

 

Good luck with your decisions,

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve,

 

I'm leaning towards your approach...

 

I played a K2600X again yesterday, and I don't think it's what I'm looking for. I love the piano patches, and the drums are nice and punchy, but overall, I don't think I have the financial muscle or the know-how to really exploit this board.

 

If I had a huge sample library and the peripherals already in place, then I might consider it. But this still doesn't address the learning curve. My Korg Wavestation is a wonderfully programmable instrument (despite the lack of resonant filters http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/frown.gif), but I never have the time or patience to program it (other than minor tweaks). It's not that I don't understand the parameters, it's the sheer quantity of them. The sounds are based on so many small partials, that you have to tweak pages and pages before you really affect the sound. A 3rd party editor has helped, but it's still a beast.

 

I find myself programming my Roland D20 much more. It's a basic subtractive synth, and I know exactly how to get the sounds I'm looking for.

 

My point? I think the K2600 falls into the Wavestation category. With the limited time I have, I just don't see myself exploring VAST.

 

With this in mind, I am leaning toward a Kurz PC2X and a Roland XV-3080. The PC2X will cover my piano needs, and the Roland will cover everything else. I can obtain both of these pieces for roughly the same cost as one K2600X.

 

I also prefer the ROM blocks on the Roland XV series to the CD-ROM library of the Kurz. Why? Because there is no loading time whatsoever. Yes, there are FAR more sounds available on CD-ROM, but I can get by with what Roland offers. Kurzweil offers ROM blocks as well, but there are not enough of them (2), and they are overpriced.

 

Thanks again everyone for the help,

 

Wiggum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your last post reminds me of something I said in a forum about a month ago, when the last 2500's were being closed out. I think the Kurzweil could be a money pit: between CDRom drives and sample libraries, P-Ram expansions and upcoming ROM boards, there is so much potential for it to push itself into the stratosphere even if the base price is cheap.

 

I agree with you, and this not only applies to the kurz but also any hardware sampler. 1-2 yrs ago I got a good deal on a used ESi-32, which I like, but when I started realizing how much I had to spend to get the full potential of the instrument I had to back away. I'll probably sell it soon, since it has become more of a novalty and a cool toy rather than a tool to make music. To get the ESi where I want it to be I would need to spend $1000 + , which I'd rather spend in a module.

 

The one advantage of the kurz is that it plays samples without the sampling option, and there's TONS of stuff on the web, not the case with the ESI (granted it reads WAVs, but you gotta map and do all the other stuff). I downloaded a set of banks this morning and alas, I found a resonant pad I used to love in one of the alpha junos ;-)

 

[/b] Plus I think it's easier to justify buying a new Yamaha FS1R for new strange sounds than buying two, maybe three sample CD sets for the Kurzweil, as the hardware is really something brand new[/b]

 

I agree, but then on the other hand you risk ending up with a bunch of 'preset players' since you don't have time to go deep into them.

 

As much as a praise kurzweil for continuing support on their instruments (sofware upgrades, new ROM blocks), the price of the upgrades shocks me.

 

ROM block for k2000, $ 350. Yamaha plg 150 AN, new synth engine $ 250. Sound quality aside, does it really make a difference in the end? I think I rather have the new sonic flexibility. But then again this depends from person to person.

 

The price you pay for continuing R&D and product support, I guess. Or is it?

 

Rod

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple things about options. You don't have to have them. If you think that you wouldn't have use for our Orchestral ROM and have $300 that you'd want to put elsewhere then go ahead.

 

CD-ROM drives, I've seen anywhere from $30-150. An Orb Drive can be purchased for $159.00, but again these items are NOT neccessary, it depends on what you're going to do. I'd have to agree about the sampler. The K2600 comes with 64MB of RAM for loading samples. You only would need the sampler if you intend on doing your own sampling, need digital outs, or are using RAM tracks or Live Mode.

 

As for the over all time it takes to "master" a K2600. Again it really depends on what you need to do. First and formost this is an instrument. Once you get through the basics of navigation, selecting and loading sounds, its up to you...you can go as deep as you like. I think you'll find making basic adjustments to sounds relatively easy. Assigning a controller to do something is as easy as holding down the enter button and moving the slider or wheel. Of course diving in the VAST or Triple Mode and building sounds from scratch is another story

 

 

 

This message has been edited by Mike Martin on 03-17-2001 at 06:54 PM

-Mike Martin

 

Casio

Mike Martin Photography Instagram Facebook

The Big Picture Photography Forum on Music Player Network

 

The opinions I post here are my own and do not represent the company I work for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why waste my time with MIDI and SCSI sample dumps
I don't know? Why would you be doing this on a K2600? Just because it has that capability doesn't mean that you have to use it.

 

One other interesting point. If you like Roland sounds, great. Load them into your Kurzweil. Most of the sounds that are available on their ROM expansions are also available on CD-ROM from either Roland or Ilio. Whats interesting is that for the same price how much MORE you get. Don't forget you can configure a K2600 to load your favorite sampled sounds each time you turn it on.

 

there is so much potential for it to push itself into the stratosphere even if the base price is cheap.

 

You'd rather we build instruments without potential? We give you the choice. What you use is up to you. If you decide to go with some software synths and other products. You're not going to find a better controller keyboard to run your studio from than a K2600...though I'm sure you use it for more than just that.

-Mike Martin

 

Casio

Mike Martin Photography Instagram Facebook

The Big Picture Photography Forum on Music Player Network

 

The opinions I post here are my own and do not represent the company I work for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, you've got me wound up.

 

If Kurzweil improved the programmability of the PC2X (and provided a larger LCD) I would follow that route. Neither of these options is likely to happen.

 

The PC2X does allow you to edit sounds. Unlike your Wavestation, you have easy and quick access to the parameters that you need. I'm at a loss because you think the K2600 is too flexible, and the PC2 isn't flexible enough. The PC2X like the K2600 is an excellent controller, you said you liked the action. You can add a ribbon controller or breath controller and the built in sounds are superb...plus its expandable.

-Mike Martin

 

Casio

Mike Martin Photography Instagram Facebook

The Big Picture Photography Forum on Music Player Network

 

The opinions I post here are my own and do not represent the company I work for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Wiggum, we know you'll be getting a studio tan, but I don't believe you mentioned what kind of music you'll be doing (or aspire to). Dance? World? Jazz? Lots of acoustic emulation? Polka? Even if the answer is "everything," it helps to know.

 

The 2600s are amazing synths, but if you're writing loop-based music or trying to do acoustic emulation, it'd be wacky to buy that axe and not use the sampling features. And if you're on a limited budget (who isn't these days), getting all decked out with the CD-ROM *and* CDs *and* removable media for backing up sample sets *and* RAM (if you'll want more, and you will), is going to get expensive.

 

You might ask yourself -- again, depending on what kind of music you'll be writing -- whether your money is better spent on an expandable synth, or on lots of sample CDs/plug-ins/etc. that run on a soft sampler (since you already have the computer horsepower).

 

Regarding the "a good axe is always a good axe" argument, that's true to a point. But even the best axe (and the K's are certainly on the short list) isn't right for everybody's application.

 

Cheers,

 

Marv

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey all,

 

I should clarify my original post. There is nothing wrong (or very little wrong) with a Kurzweil K2600. My point was that maybe this isn't the best purchase for someone with a small home studio. I agree that the power features might be perfect for the pros, but when you are trying to build a project studio with the most bang for the buck, a large purchase like this is likely the wrong answer.

 

As for all the talk regarding options, I can clarify my position very easily. The presets and the controllers on the K2600 are not enough to justify the price. If I were to spend $3,300 on a single instrument, I would want to explore the other capabilities. Bottom line: When you add the cost of the options, it is no longer a $3,300 instrument.

 

I played the Roland module today (XV-3080), and with a PC2X driving the rig, I think I found the right combination. I'll take another look at a K2600, but I think I can generate a more diverse sound with the combination of the two boards.

 

Marv: I write progressive rock, techno, and jazz. It's a bizarre combination, but I what I really need is a well-rounded rig.

 

All the best,

 

Wiggum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wiggum,

 

PC2X and XV3080 sounds f@$*in awesome. They are both incredible sounding instruments, they are both expandable and ready for the future, and between those two instruments you have a ton of killer sounds. Having the goods of both Kurzweil and another company, or Roland and another company for that matter, helps to not make your music sound canned. Not that all music written on just a K2500 or just a JV2080 sounds canned, but a lot of it does. Both of those synths are highly flexible pieces, and don't forget that the ribbon option for the PC2X is only something like $60 - see the bottom of this Kurzweil option page

 

And the PC2X is certainly a deep instrument in its own right, despite the fact that it's not "as deep" in programmability, you still have plenty of stuff you can do to those patches.

 

Where do you think you'll be purchasing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just lost my post, but I'll try to recreate it...

 

The big question is WHEN. The nice thing about buying two pieces is that I can scatter the purchases. I don't need to drop all the money in one day. I can buy the Kurz, and later buy the Roland.

 

I was really impressed by the sound of the Roland. Strangely, I don't get that same feeling with the XV-88 (despite an identical sound engine). I thought about that board quite a bit (XV-88), but there is something I just don't like about it.

 

I hope my doubts about the PC2X are wrong. I am going into this purchase treating it like a digital piano with a strong MIDI implementation, and if it turns out to be highly programmable, then it's all the better. I actually like the K2600 piano better (although it doesn't use as many samples). Maybe it's the effects engine.

 

Wiggum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was really impressed by the sound of the Roland. Strangely, I don't get that same feeling with the XV-88 (despite an identical sound engine). I thought about that board quite a bit (XV-88), but there is something I just don't like about it.

 

I find that a lot of times I get that impression because of the keybed. When I originally played the ep's in my cs6x, I wasn't too impressed. But when I played it through my pc88mx, I seemed like it was a different synth altogether. I got a new level of expession and playability. I really like a lot of the ep's now. I didn't care much for the xv-88 keybed personally. I'm a big fan of purchasing a controller that you connect well with the keybed and worry about modules later.

 

The converse if true also. A synth lead sound, for instance, I rather play in a non-weighted synth style keybed.

 

Rod

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't need to drop all the money in one day. I can buy the Kurz, and later buy the Roland.

 

While this is true, this assumes you're going to pick them up for their standard MAP prices (i.e. $1900 and $1500). Usually if you buy them together, the salesman is easily convinced to drop the prices of the package. If the salesman is having a good day/week, you may even be able to get the two for near 3,000.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll try it...

 

I mostly deal with the big name companies (Guitar Center), and they could usually care less whether I buy or not. At least that's the attitude I get. They deal with so much volume that a guy like me makes no difference.

 

As much as I would like to deal with a smaller retailer, they often don't carry the inventory of the big names. I have yet to find a small music shop with a K2600 or other high-end Kurzweil.

 

All the best,

 

Wiggum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Howdy, this is an interesting post. I just bought the xv 5080. Aside from the fact that I really love Roland sounds, I sold a jv 1080 and emu-e6400 (plus a few other little studio items) to get it. I have 3 of the JV expansion boards a ton of sampled CDs and (so far) 64 meg of ram in the xv. I really like the polyphony and the flexibility to do either samples or upgrade ROMs as you like. Plus, if there's something I can;t do with the xv, I can dump the sound into my computer (it has rbus, scsi and another digital out--spdif?) and tweak it like crazy. I like jazz, new age etc and the JV was great for me. I thought I would never sell it... of course, it was only for big brother (although I looked on the receipt and I think I had it for 6 years). I drive it with an Alesis QS8 and have a few other synths for niches. In any event, the Kurzweil and Roland both sound great, no matter where you go, good luck!!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, Wiggum:

 

First of all, I am sorry if my English seems a little bit challenging for you. It's not my native language.

 

I guess I do understand you, then I'll tell you what am I doing. I do own my project studio. I do run it in a PIII @ 700 MHz, sequencing with Cubase 5.0 and / or CakeWalk PA 9.0. I do also use ACID PRO 2.0.

 

I do use a lot of virtual synths, like the PRO52, B4, REAKTOR, GiGaSampler, ReBirth and some other plugins. For AUDIO Editing my axe is SOUNDFORGE and a big arsenal of FX Plugins... Yes, everything is software and I believe it is the best thing to do in a small project studio... until I can afford to get a basic PROTOOLS rig (but I sincerely think I don't need it right now)

 

I'd love to have three grand and buy the K2600 to play live, instead of taking my Laptop running stereo masters and software synths, and even while I believe the K2600 would be my "Desert Island" choice, I don't think of it as a "must have" investment for a small studio; adittionally I can tell for sure it is not as quick or powerful as dedicated software can be. Now you decide...

 

This message has been edited by GusTraX on 03-19-2001 at 05:28 PM

Músico, Productor, Ingeniero, Tecnólogo

Senior Product Manager, América Latina y Caribe - PreSonus

at Fender Musical Instruments Company

 

Instagram: guslozada

Facebook: Lozada - Música y Tecnología

 

www.guslozada.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Wiggum,

I own a K2000 and K2500R, and have to say that after many years, they are the only (hardware) instruments I own that have never given me ear fatigue. They consistently sound flat and natural, and I always find myself going back to them for sounds to get a project off the ground. The "money pit" observation from a previous post is valid, however. The price of the PRAM upgrade shows a particular arrogance on Kurzweil's part, and you'd think that for what the K2600 cost when rolled out it'd have had some new sound ROM.

Software samplers, such as Unity DS-1 or Emagic's EXS-24 which runs under Logic, offer tight integration with your sequencing environment. Then again, solid hardware that sounds good tends to get a lot of work done without using precious CPU cycles.

My advice? Skip the K2600, and look for a good deal on a used K2500... I see the rackmount versions in the Recycler (a Southern CA music-oriented classified ads magazine) often for around US$1500, sometimes including things like PRAM, an internal hard drive, and lots of third-party soundware. That way you can satisfy your Kurz jones and perhaps have a few sheckels left over for some of those VST instruments you want. Cheers.

Stephen Fortner

Principal, Fortner Media

Former Editor in Chief, Keyboard Magazine

Digital Piano Consultant, Piano Buyer Magazine

 

Industry affiliations: Antares, Arturia, Giles Communications, MS Media, Polyverse

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Wiggum,

I own a K2000 and K2500R, and have to say that after many years, they are the only (hardware) instruments I own that have never given me ear fatigue. They consistently sound flat and natural, and I always find myself going back to them for sounds to get a project off the ground. The "money pit" observation from a previous post is valid, however. The price of the PRAM upgrade shows a particular arrogance on Kurzweil's part, and you'd think that for what the K2600 cost when rolled out it'd have had some new sound ROM.

Software samplers, such as Unity DS-1 or Emagic's EXS-24 which runs under Logic, offer tight integration with your sequencing environment. Then again, solid hardware that sounds good tends to get a lot of work done without using precious CPU cycles.

My advice? Skip the K2600, and look for a good deal on a used K2500... I see the rackmount versions in the Recycler (a Southern CA music-oriented classified ads magazine) often for around US$1500, sometimes including things like PRAM, an internal hard drive, and lots of third-party soundware. That way you can satisfy your Kurz jones and perhaps have a few sheckels left over for some of those VST instruments you want. Cheers.

Stephen Fortner

Principal, Fortner Media

Former Editor in Chief, Keyboard Magazine

Digital Piano Consultant, Piano Buyer Magazine

 

Industry affiliations: Antares, Arturia, Giles Communications, MS Media, Polyverse

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...