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leslie simulators


analogman1

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Greetings,

I have Roland VK-7. The built in Leslie simulator is adequate but I'm looking for the "next level" in sound. I use a Barbetta 32c amp as a monitor; the organ, along with all other keys, goes through the PA. I'm considering adding a Motion Sound head (either the one with the built in mics or the other one), or possibly a ***small*** Leslie (I used to have a Leslie 760 and two 122's, but who wants to haul that stuff around!--can't afford a roadie http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif ) Please note that I have other stuff (Roland XV-88, 2080, XP-30) so maybe I should just live with the built in simulator and get a few Mackie SRM450's!!)

Any Ideas??

Tom

Tom

Nord Electro 5D, Modal Cobalt 8, Yamaha upright piano, numerous plug-ins...

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  • 1 month later...
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I might not get back to you, but a friend of mine might have the answer. If he does, I sure will. He has a Korg keyboard, but I'm not sure if he works off that or a MIDI module. I know he's experimenting with Leslie high and low simulation. One of his project results was a rippin' recording of "Whiter Shade of Pale", using high, low, and the subtle chopping sound made when the two switch. I didn't have the presence of mind to ask if the chopping effect was inherent, preprogrammed, or if he processed it himself with his own personal wizardry. Frankly, I was struck dumb by the demonstration.
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When I first got my VK-7, the Leslie simulation was what sold me on it. Over the past 2 years, I've managed to keep myself happy by tweaking the parameters ( especially fast rotor spin, ramp up/down, and equalization/ amp type ). I find that for a full drawbar sound ( 88-8888-888 ) the #2amp type works better for me ( going through a Roland KC-500 amp ) than the default #1, which I think is too shrill. I've A/B'd it with my B-3/pair of 122's, and it still holds its own, especially through a straight speaker. Also, for some reason, it always sounds better when it's recorded than live. Just when I think it's time for a Pro 3T, I change a parameter or 2 and justify keeping the status quo by realizing I'm not making an extra trip in and out and can still break down faster than the drummer.......

1967 B-3 w/(2) 122's, Nord C1w/Leslie 2101 top, Nord PedalKeys 27, Nord Electro 4D, IK B3X, QSC K12.2, Yamaha reface YC+CS+CP

 

"It needs a Hammond"

 

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I used for a couple of years a Leslie 301. Its the small road-worthy Black Leslie with a rotating horn & low rotor simulation. I sure it is similar to a Pro-3 with a combo amp. Played an XB-2 & when I upgraded, an XK-2. The sound was better than a complete simulation but not as good as an old style wooden Leslie. The highs were a bit shrill & the lows were not as big. They may not make it anymore. The replacement model is a Leslie 302. It provides 2 channels, one for your Hammond sound & one for your piano/synth sounds. I got lucky & had the opportunity to get a Leslie 145. It weighs about the same but a touch bigger than the 301/302. But sounds way better.

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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If you don't want to go with a Leslie then at least get yourself a tube preamp to run the vk thru. I just have a mono ART that I bought used for 60 bucks and it really takes that shrill edge off of the sound. Also try knocking off some of the highs and boosting some of the mids in the internal eq on your vk.

 

But, you know there is nothing like a 122. I have resorted to carrying one around and it's not that difficult. I got one of those folding aluminum hand trucks and added a pair of Marshall speaker cabinet handles and I can put mine in and out of the van by myself with little effort.

 

I will NEVER give it up. There is just nothing like that sound resonating out of that wood cabinet. When you come out of a chorus and the dynamics of the song drop off the edge and you grab a nice fat 11th or 13th chord and let that leslie wind down it makes people buckle at the knees.

 

I played B3 alot back in the 70's and then got rid of it. Now that I am doing this Blues/Jazz thing I need that sound again and I forgot just how much I loved it. I, too tried everything to make my vk sound like a B3, but then I tried running my C3 that I have in my studio into a leslie simulator and dicovered that it sounds just as bad as the vk without a real leslie. Just my humble opinion, but what can I say, I'm in love. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Originally posted by Jim:

I might not get back to you, but a friend of mine might have the answer. If he does, I sure will. He has a Korg keyboard, but I'm not sure if he works off that or a MIDI module. I know he's experimenting with Leslie high and low simulation. One of his project results was a rippin' recording of "Whiter Shade of Pale", using high, low, and the subtle chopping sound made when the two switch. I didn't have the presence of mind to ask if the chopping effect was inherent, preprogrammed, or if he processed it himself with his own personal wizardry. Frankly, I was struck dumb by the demonstration.

 

Hey Jim,

Is there any way I could get a midi of your friends recording of "A Whiter Shade of Pale". Love that song. Thanks you.

 "Let It Be!"

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First, take the suggestion to try the different settings in the VK-7. There's a lot you can do with the leslie sound.

Second, there's a leslie simulator by Hughes & Kettner that has a tube inside it. The name escapes me now, but it's one of the better boxes I've heard in a while. Guitar players tend to buy it more, but it sounds fantastic on B-3 sounds also. Or, of course there are a ton of others out there.

Bill Murphy

www.murphonics.com

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Trust me, Tom:

Get a LapTop and run B4 live... http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

GusTraX@yahoo.com

Músico, Productor, Ingeniero, Tecnólogo

Senior Product Manager, América Latina y Caribe - PreSonus

at Fender Musical Instruments Company

 

Instagram: guslozada

Facebook: Lozada - Música y Tecnología

 

www.guslozada.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

I will always swear by the Korg ToneWorks G4 Leslie Simulator. I actually gig with TWO of them... one for leslie sim for my Hammond XK-2, and another for adding a woodsy tone to Electric piano patches (rotor on slow).

 

I use it instead of my Hammond xk-2 internal leslie because the G4 has an AWESOME overdrive, authentic ramp-up/down, and can be tweaked real-time, unlike the internal leslie sim of the hammond XK-2. I can also use a volume pedal to dynamically control the speed of the G4 leslie...very useful.

 

The G4 is no longer in production, (god knows why - very sought after) but even so was still given very high marks in a Keyboard mag leslie sim comparison feature a while back. (look through your old keyboard mag issues for the reviews) I bought one new for $350, and another used for $100. You should be able to find a G4 on e-bay or from an online shop with enough searching.

 

-Gregg

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