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What's the best Weighted Keyboard?


testyza

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I do not have any idea...would like to know what every1 here has to say...

 

Comments on the Fatar SL-880 would be awesome...how it compares to others, etc.

(They don't sell them locally that I know of)

 

Ensoniq KT-88, Roland A-80, Peavey, Yamaha, anything!

 

Simple controllers as the Fatar, or full featured workstations...I'd like to know what people think..any articles on this?

 

Besides 1on1 reviews....

 

Rel

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My recommendation is Yamaha or Roland. If you're trying to find something that comes close to the feel of an acoustic grand piano, these are your only hope. I think the Yamaha P80/P200 have the best (read heaviest) actions, followed by the Yamaha S80 (which isn't quite as tight). The Roland controllers, such as the XV-88, are fine. Yamaha and Roland manufacture their own keyboards and have invested a good deal in trying to recreate the feel of an acoustic grand piano action. Most other companies rely on Fatar actions which I find way too light.

 

Here's my story. A year ago, a friend of mine ask me to shop for a grand piano for her. In the past 10+ years I've played electronic keyboards exclusively and in the last four my main weighted controller was a Kurzweil K2500X. As I began trying out grand pianos I quickly came to realize that I couldn't reasonably play any of them. All of the actions seemed heavy and slow. Frustrated that I had become a piano player who could no longer play, I became interested in finding an acoustic piano for myself. I eventually purchased a Steinway B and began the process of rebuilding the strength in my fingers, hands, arms and shoulders. After three months of daily playing (2 to 8 hours) I finally got to level where I felt I could play the acoustic piano at the same level as an electronic keyboard. This process did wipe me out, but with each day I could feel my muscles getting stronger.

 

The K2500X became problematic. If I played it for any length of time and then switch to the Steinway, the acoustic would again begin to feel too heavy. I decided I needed a better weighted keyboard. I replaced it with a Yamaha P200, but soon found it too limiting as a master controller and ended up with the Roland XV-88.

 

If you have no interest in ever playing acoustic piano, then a Fatar action (as is used by Kurzweil) will be fine. The Kurzweil line remains a sore spot for me. I invested well over $5,000 in the K2500X with options. I should have done my homework and paid more attention to the keybed. I know I'm in the minority, but I think top-end Kurzweils are outrageously over priced synths with one lame keybed. $20,000 for a K2600 with some sample CDs is a joke. You could put together a nice studio for that amount.

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Originally posted by burningbusch@home.com:

The Roland controllers, such as the XV-88, are fine. Yamaha and Roland manufacture their own keyboards and have invested a good deal in trying to recreate the feel of an acoustic grand piano action. Most other companies rely on Fatar actions which I find way too light.

 

I replaced it with a Yamaha P200, but soon found it too limiting as a master controller and ended up with the Roland XV-88.

 

Not all the fatar actions are the same. My PC88mx has a Fatar action (as far as I know) and it's much different from the alesis qs8.1 for instance (too light in my opinion). It's funny you brought up the xv88, 'cause I found the action waaaay too light (Excellent synth/controller neverthless) I still think the pc88mx has a reasonable heavy feel to it. I've actually played some pianos which were a little lighter than it, so it's been a decent compromise for me.

 

Don't know about the newer ensoniqs, but the actions in the early 90's stuff was pathetic.

 

Check the keybed thread that Dave had started around december, you may find some useful info there.

 

Rod

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Originally posted by rsaboiasilva@hotmail.com:

Not all the fatar actions are the same. My PC88mx has a Fatar action (as far as I know) and it's much different from the alesis qs8.1 for instance (too light in my opinion). It's funny you brought up the xv88, 'cause I found the action waaaay too light (Excellent synth/controller neverthless) I still think the pc88mx has a reasonable heavy feel to it. I've actually played some pianos which were a little lighter than it, so it's been a decent compromise for me.

 

Don't know about the newer ensoniqs, but the actions in the early 90's stuff was pathetic.

 

Check the keybed thread that Dave had started around december, you may find some useful info there.

 

Rod

 

 

That's strange, Rod. I have a QS8 and I've always thought the action was too heavy. I kicked myself for a long time for not buying a PC88 which I think has the most inspiring action of any synth I've played. Being a Hammond player for most of my 45 years I naturally would prefer a lighter action than a dyed in the wool pianist. I am on the road most of the week and take my 61 note Triton with me wherever I go. When I come home it takes me a long warmup period before I'm ready to gig on the QS again. If I'm home for and extended period then the QS gets easier, but if I pull off a midweek gig I don't even bother with the QS8. I just use the Triton for my piano sounds.

So, in answer to what is the best board there's a couple of opposing opinions according to our personal backgrounds and needs. I do agree with Rod, though, that all Fatar actions are not the same. I believe most of these companies spec them out for their own instruments and Fatar builds them to thoses specs, not their own. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

jwk

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I understand that not all Fatar actions are the same, I just haven't run in to one that has impressed me much. They just seem kind of basic. The XV-88, BTW, uses the same PA-4 action that's found in the Roland A-90EX controller.

 

Here's something I wish Fatar WOULD make: a B3-style controller with waterfall keys, the nine drawbars, perc/chorus switches and a leslie toggle that hangs off the edge. No sounds, just a controller. That one I'd buy in an instant to use with my B4.

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Originally posted by burningbusch@home.com:

I understand that not all Fatar actions are the same, I just haven't run in to one that has impressed me much. They just seem kind of basic.

I don't know an extensive history of Fatar keyboards, but I do know a little bit. I wish I knew more.. but their website (www.studiologic.net) doesn't have a company history. As far as I know, the PC-88 is not a hammer action, I believe it was the last of the spring-loaded keys (Though very high-quality). The main reason why I believe this is because I have one and I have keys that squeak. After that point they started really spending time making hammer actions. I hear from a lot of people that they made the keys for Alesis, but I never heard that direct from Alesis displays or reps. I remember the original displays of the action in the Qs-8: it's a plastic hammer action, is among the lighter hammer actions, but I can understand it "feeling" heavy in comparison to other keyboards pre-1995 because those were spring loaded keys. Not that spring-keys are always light, if you ever played a Yamaha PF85, you know what I mean.

 

Now all of Fatar's keyboards are Hammer action, and the latest ones use what they call Countoured Strike Force. This is similar to Yamaha's Graded action and something Korg does as well. Unfortunately this technique of making the lower notes heavier than the higher notes was started in the high-end home piano market and is just beginning to trickle down into the stage piano market. For instance, I really liked the Korg action in their 8600 piano (even though it sounds like ass!). But the older Korg SG-1 unfortunately does not have that action. To feel these actions you have to go to a piano store because most keyboard stores don't carry those lines. The action is becoming a really hot issue in that market, even companies like Technics that claim to have this graded feature in their home pianos.

 

Other Fatar stuff: I _really_ like the action in their SL-1176 which I got to play this summer on the last model available. It inspired me even without hearing it. The same action is in their older SL900, and I'm nearly sure it was in the Ensoniq ZR-76 although they have since updated that keybed (and I think that's why the price reduction came through, mostly from the Fatar side). The SL-1100 and 2001 have slightly heavier actions that the two I just described with the graded concept.

 

The SL880 and 990 have basically the same action, with their new CSF stuff, except the 990 is a better controller. These are great value keyboards, with very good actions and cheap prices. However I do agree that they have a sort of "bland" quality to them, that they lack a personality. To this end, Kurzweil always tweaks the action a bit in their keyboards, and did that even more so for the 2600, making it a tad lighter than the 2500 but more personable, and sort of more responsive.

 

The XV-88, BTW, uses the same PA-4 action that's found in the Roland A-90EX controller.

 

This is not entirely true. What Roland calls PA-4 technology is featured in the RD600, the A90 and the XV88, however each one is slightly different. The RD has no aftertouch, and I sort of feel that the A90 is a little bit lighter than the XV88. I think the XV88 is a great keyboard, its piano sounds are really playable and the keys connect with the sounds well. The Roland action is very fluid, responsive, and sort of in the middle (or upper middle) ground as far as how heavy it is but when I play them I really feel like the=re's something under the key that's responding well. (Where as with the QS8 I feel there's something under the key that has no idea what I'm doing) Plus, the aftertouch is really well implemented, it doesn't muddy the action itself like it does on the Korg Triton ProX. If money wasn't an issue (not that the XV is inordinately expensive - after all, the XV engine is quite powerful), I would definitely choose the XV88 out of the current crop of weighted actions.

 

It's not an easy decision because there's the beautiful silver Kawai MP9000 which feels great and has very thick piano sounds. I think it is a very very close second to the XV88 in the top actions right now. But as I said before, there is still room for improvement in all these keyboards, and at some point all the new stuff from the high-end home pianos will appear in the stage piano market.

 

 

Here's something I wish Fatar WOULD make: a B3-style controller with waterfall keys, the nine drawbars, perc/chorus switches and a leslie toggle that hangs off the edge. No sounds, just a controller. That one I'd buy in an instant to use with my B4.

 

I suggest you email them this suggestion. I don't know of any other company that would be willing to do something like this, and it's a shame because the Voce V5 is still a great module (or the older V3 for that matter) and since the B4 kicks ass, and even since Fatar has some ties with the European company Blue Chip, makers of the OX7 organ module which is rather Farfisa strong. It's true that one of the major issues in the Virtual B arena has been the keyboard.. Roland's sound is nice but their keyboard is spongy and synthy, not organ like. I think your suggestion is very cool and they might take to it quite well.

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I know I've kinda overstepped my quota already but while I was writing the above post some issues came to mind.

 

You usually have to reference your taste in a keyboard action to your taste in a grand-piano action. It's impossible to make two people agree that a particular keyboard action is the best, when one may find a Yamaha acoustic action the best and another a Baldwin (don't get me wrong, there are some awesome Baldwins), let alone something really expensive like a Boesendorfer or Steinway. With an instrument whose price runs into the upper stratosphere, there are some aspects you can talk about which are on a more coarse level, and others that only apply for really expensive pianos. I've talked with a couple pianists who could go on and on about the most obscure keybed feelings, on European pianos I've never heard of. (See the Keyboard issue on Piano 2000 to find out the newest techniques with adjustable actions.)

 

The point is, unlike with the B-3 there is no "Ur-piano" to which you can compare the best electronic keyboard action. Just like when selecting an acoustic grand, you have to sit down with each instrument and get to know it a bit before you make the decision to buy it. This is where buying a keyboard is most like buying a guitar - you can't (shouldn't) buy it based on specs alone.

 

To that end I've given my opinion of various actions based on my experience with specific keyboards that I've played and my own tastes in an action. My acoustic taste: I like K. Kawai's and Yamaha C3's for 6-7 footers with what I'd describe as a medium heavy, long-throw (deep) yet very responsive action. I grew up with a Yamaha upright so sometimes I'm not that picky. But as you can see I have no problem describing how each one feels..

 

One more thing: there are two keyboards that have many faithful users even though they have nearly no presence on today's market. One is the Peavy C8P, one of the best master controllers ever and descendent of one of the most popular. The other is the out of production Yamaha KX88/76 which is also kind of a classic controller. I unfortunately don't have hands-on experience with either, but the amount of established users who still love 'em really says something.

 

This message has been edited by steve44@visto.com on 01-31-2001 at 02:06 AM

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What's the best Weighted Keyboard?

 

Well, hard to say. I would suggest you to get to a big musicstore, simply throwing your hands at as many keyboards as you can. For me, as I'm a classical trained pianist the Kawai MP9000 works best (and I've tried 'em all). My priority choosing a weighted, was the action and the piano sound. but maybe your priorities differ from mine. If you're searchin' for an action which is *very* close to the real thing the MP9000 is a hit.

 

bluebus

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First off, MANY Thank for every1's input.

 

This might sound funny:

 

I love the piano, but my market for producing is rap/hip/hop oriented.

 

So, yes I'd love piano action, since I don't have one to play. I can use sound modules for the necessary elements, and when I have time to practice I just hook up some piano sounds.

 

I'm a newbie, and basically suck at piano, just the simplest songs I can do.

(Of Bass/Treble...some very easy Blue/Jazz stuff)

 

Used to have a piano, but haven't had one fore almost a year, and have only been practicing guitar.

 

The itch got to me, and I just HAD to get something.

 

Got a great deal on a QS6.1, so that'll be my board for now.

 

It has no hammer action or true weighted keys, but for my budget, I'll get to at least PLAY and continue to practice piano http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

(And learn all about MIDI)

 

I got a chance to mess around on one yesterday, and it doesn't have the velocity sensitivity I'd like, though that can be adjusted..

 

 

Later this year, I'll definitely be picking up weighted keyboard though.

Won't be over $4,500, if that much.

 

I'd rather have a real grand, get a pretty awesome controller, sond modules and be in ga-ga heaven.

 

 

They just opened a big ole store here, and I went yesterday. They didn't have some of what everyone is talking about, but one thing I DO remember is a Yamaha weighted keyboard, and it sucked big time.(it was an older one, and I'll get more info on it for you skeptics later)

 

Thanks for all the input, and keep it coming as long as you want, it'll help others w/same question...

 

Off to check out Dave's post

testyza

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Steve44,

 

Thanks for the details. I'll have to give the new Fatars another try. Regarding the PA-4 and the XV-88. I got that info from Roland's marketing lit. I didn't have a A90 to compare against when I was trying out the XV-88. As far as acoustic grand actions, I've liked every Renner action that I've played. They seem very consistent, unlike Steinways which are all different.

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I hear from a lot of people that they made the keys for Alesis, but I never heard that direct from Alesis displays or reps.

 

FATAR makes all of the keybeds for all Alesis synths, as well as all Kurzweil, General Music, Peavey, and most (if not all) Korg synths, and some of the Roland ones as well.

 

I remember the original displays of the action in the Qs-8: it's a plastic hammer action

 

No, it isn't.

 

The QS8's FATAR TP-20 keybed has a metal moving mass hammer action, unlike most other FATAR 88 key keybeds. The TP20 can also be found in the General Music pianos, the Kurzweil Mark 12 piano, and some of the FATAR controllers.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Testy,

 

What do you mean by best, best action, best sound, or best what. Some would argue that this super heavy action which some call great, is an actual hinderance to some players. All keyboardist are not pianist!!!!

Now if your talking about best sound anyone who thinks that anything sounds better than the Kurz PC2X needs to lay off the crack pipe or haven't heard the thing. Every time I play it I'm blown away and my friends who own K2600 are pissed that they spent $7000, and I got the newly record 24 bit Rom, almost the entire Rom for the PC2 is brand spanking new. And KB3 mode is untouchable. The only gripe I have is that the thing is so programmable I feeling up my user rom with new presets, and this beast doesn have a floppy disk. How Stupid!!!!!!! This is far from a controller or a stage piano, its also a sleeper in the synth department. If this thing had flash ram, or could except the 2600 sampling board the 2600 would be obsolete LOL.

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From testyzaLater this year, I'll definitely be picking up weighted keyboard though. Won't be over $4,500, if that much.

 

Was that a typo? I didn't mention anything that expensive, maybe you meant $1500? If you're on a limited budget and Piano is mostly not your thing, I'd definitely be careful, think about something in the $1000 range and leave yourself open to other possibilities (like software).

 

Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

FATAR makes all of the keybeds for all Alesis synths, as well as all Kurzweil, General Music, Peavey, and most (if not all) Korg synths, and some of the Roland ones as well.

 

Dave, thanks for the information. The only one I knew was Kurzweil. Now I understand why the GEM Piano felt so much like the QS8. And I hope I don't offend you in saying I can't stand that action. I am also interested to hear that they do stuff for Korg, as I was rather impressed by the Triton ProX - it has the best weighted action evber on a Korg. It's very close to the SL1100.

 

Now if only Nord would use their keyboards and make something that feels decent.. we'll see about the "3".

 

Oh and on the topic of advanced actions, I noticed Roland's new home pianos use "Progressive action with escapement". It'll be interesting to watch these new keybed technologies make their way into our market. I'm guessing this will be in the RD600's replacement..

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And I hope I don't offend you in saying I can't stand that action.

 

Not at all, Steve - I didn't make 'em... http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/wink.gif

 

Besides, everyone has different tastes, and I don't ever think anyone is wrong for not liking something - if it doesn't work for you, it doesn't work for you. That's all there is.

 

I am also interested to hear that they do stuff for Korg, as I was rather impressed by the Triton ProX - it has the best weighted action evber on a Korg. It's very close to the SL1100.

 

It might even be the same keybed.

 

Now if only Nord would use their keyboards and make something that feels decent.. we'll see about the "3".

 

I don't know where Clavia gets their keybeds. Chances are excellent that they buy them from FATAR as well.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I had written a somewhat lenghty post, but I typed my password wrong, so the program cleared all fields... come on guys, we don't need this nasty behavior. Give us a second chance if we make a mistake! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/mad.gif

 

marino

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Originally posted by marino:

I had written a somewhat lenghty post, but I typed my password wrong, so the program cleared all fields... come on guys, we don't need this nasty behavior. Give us a second chance if we make a mistake! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/mad.gif

 

marino

 

It did? Wow - that's never happened to me...the program usually tells me that I typed an incorrect password and that I should use the back button, and the text is still there. I just tried it with this post, and ithe text stayed there just fine...hmmm...

 

I suspect that it is p[ossible that this may be a Mac/PC thing - are you on a PC, Marino?

 

I have noticed that I can go back and forth from a reply that I am typing to the main page with the thread without losing any text when I'm using my Mac, but if I try that on my PC, all fields get cleared as soon as I hit the back button. Strange...

 

Can you folks tell me whether you have had similar experiences? Maybe Rudy (our webmaster) can fix it...

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Yeah, I'm using Windows98 and IE 5.0 on a PC. When I tried to submit my reply, the program alerted that the password was wrong, and to use the back button to return.. I did, and the reply page was blank, with all fields cleared.
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Marino,

 

That's an IE thing. It doesn't remember what was in fields once it leaves the page. This can get really annoying, especially when you go back to a page that came after you sent in a field because it will say the information has expired or something stupid. Netscape doesn't have that problem, but it has its own problems.. it's kinda like a PC/Mac decision. I only used Netscape for the longest time.. but my email program works best on IE so I use IE.

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First, testyza, I want to wish you much keyboard happiness with the QS6.1. As we all see from the interesting thread you began, there's no easy answer to this because personal taste, more than anything else figured in there so heavily.

 

Anyway, I want to throw in something that surprised the heck out of me. Three months ago I began a search for the "best" weighted keyboard action. I have a 1969 Yamaha grand that I bought from a large studio, and I love its action. It was once of Yamaha's better, and actually, I haven't found another Yamaha I like better.

 

But I wanted something for the project studio. I already have a Roland RD-250, but I decided to put that in the living room for duets with the Yamaha grand. The RD-250 is the same as am RD-300 (the 250 has 76 keys, the 300, 88). Both those models came out with the RD-500, which had more sophisticated controller options and sounds. Otherwise, though, same feel. Then came the RD-600. They ALL have the PA-4 action, but as was mentioned, even 'boards with the same action can feel different, often because of the bed in which the key action sits.

 

So, I was open to Rolands, Yamahas, Korgs... well it goes on. Of the more known keyboards, the one that impressed me the most, speaking strictly from the standpoint of FEEL, was the Kawai MP-9000 Professional Stage Piano. It had WOOD keys (it matters), and a heavier hammer action mechanism that is noticeable by the case's higher physical profile. There were some elements I didn't like but I sure liked the feel of the wood. I think the store had it set up to where it was reacting oddly to the action, because no matter how incredible slowly and softly I would press a key (five seconds to get to the bottom of the key's throw), there would still be a little piano sound. It was as if there were NO zero velocity, and I didn't like that.

 

However, in keeping with being thorough, I made a trip to the Baldwin Family Music Center. How strange! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif There, I found, among MANY models, which were all unfortunately more console-like (home digital piano), there was ONE that had a terrific feel. The sound was provided by GeneralMusic's RealPiano technology (very GOOD), but the action was just wonderful. Baldwin described it as having "escapement", and that was supposedly the reason. I tried every other model they had. There were about a dozen. Most of them felt like they might have been Fatar action. Actually there were a couple that felt like the Pro 1 or 2 from GeneralMusic's RealPiano keyboards. I like the sound but not the feel. I actually bought a RealPiano module about a year ago, and would have purchased the 'board if it had been able to keep up with fast percussive playing (it was very sluggish when it came to re-triggering the same key). And this Baldwin had that console form factor I just couldn't deal with. I thought of chopping it like an old chopped B-3, but well... Anyway, later I went to the GeneralMusic web site, which is basically the Peavey web site, because they now distribute GeneralMusic in the USA. And there, to my surprise, was the ENTIRE Baldwin, sounds, keys (with escapement) and all, but with the GeneralMusic name. At the Baldwin store I was led to believe Baldwin made the action but not the sound. Well, whoever does it, the action is a winner. It really does feel like an acoustic piano.

 

Now whether it would appeal to anyone else reading this is up to personal taste. But I think almost anyone that has played acoustics would recognize that special difference that is brought about by the escapement. If you are interested in seeing it, go to:

 

http://gem.generalmusic.com/en/products/realpiano/index.html

 

I have to assume that this model is the exact same as the Baldwin RP200 I tried. Note that even the model number is the same as the GEM model. According to the GEM site (which I accessed via Peavey's site under GeneralMusic), "the RP200, RP220 and GRP300 models feature a special weighted keyboard with Hammer Action and Escapement that gives you the true sensation of playing a fine grand piano."

 

Anyway, it is true. These suckers have action that feels real, whether or not it actually appeals to individual's taste. The various weighted, hammer actions that exist in the synth keyboard world are getting better and better. That Kawai is something else, and the Roland and Yamaha, too. As far as the Korg, Kurzweil and the rest... it still remains a function of taste. I don't think Kurzweil hefty price is due to the action. In other words, that action falls in with the rest, just different.

 

But this escapement thing IS a little different, and if what you are looking for is strictly getting the acoustic piano feel, you should ,if possible, at least try it out. I have no idea who has them in stock, but most big cities probably have a Baldwin "Family Music Center" that has loads of acoustics and a dozen of so digitals that are apparently the GEM/GeneralMusic models. I don't know about price, either, but I strongly suspect that the $4,750.00 price (I think that's about what it was) of *their* RP200 (the only model they have with escapement, and that's the ticket here) *might* be a little lower with the GEM name.

 

If they would make it in a portable design (although it would have to be a little larger than most), I'd buy it yesterday.

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I can't offer much in the way of new boards out there, since I am quite happy with the current board that I have. I have to agree with Steve when he mentioned price tag. By getting a good bang for your buck you will leave yourself in the enviable position of being able to buy other gear to compliment your board. Be a fan of Roland for years and currently owning an FP8, yeah I know guys its old, I have to say that they rarely leave a keyboardist unhappy when it comes to action. I bought my FP8 from an ad in the paper, a guy who was going broke, who had run it for several weeks, each time lowering the price. I finally called him and asked him about it. He said it was 8 months old and hadn't been used by his wife. He told me it had 52 keys and was a black FP8! No such thing. When I asked him about the keys he asked me if you had to count the black keys as well or just the white. Needless to say it was the best board I ever bought, for the price. Sure there are better boards, better sound, more controls, etc,. But I have always been happy and anyone I ever spoke to on a budget couldn't disagree. Hope this helps.
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  • 7 years later...
I bought my FP8 from an ad in the paper, a guy who was going broke, who had run it for several weeks, each time lowering the price. I finally called him and asked him about it. He said it was 8 months old and hadn't been used by his wife. He told me it had 52 keys and was a black FP8! No such thing. When I asked him about the keys he asked me if you had to count the black keys as well or just the white.

 

:laugh:

 

Too funny!

 

OK, it's an old thread that I dug up from the depths of 2001, but I thought you would get a kick out of it.

 

Is There Gas in the Car? :wave:

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Here's something I wish Fatar WOULD make: a B3-style controller with waterfall keys, the nine drawbars, perc/chorus switches and a leslie toggle that hangs off the edge. No sounds, just a controller. That one I'd buy in an instant to use with my B4.

 

http://fatar.com/Studiologic/Pages/VMK_161org.html

Technical Specifications

 

The VMK-161 plus Organ

 

http://fatar.com/Studiologic/images/WMK161plus_Organ01.jpg

61 keys - TP8O (Organ) keybed with

weighted original style organ keys

Velocity and aftertouch sensitive

Preset locations: 30

Included presets:

Apple Logic/EVP88, General MIDI, IK Sample Tank, MOTU Mach 5, Propellerhead Reason,

Spectrasonics Atmosphere, Steinberg Cubase,

Synthology Ivory and Native Instruments Absynth B4, Elektrick Piano FM7, and Pro-53

MIDI Connectors:Out, USB

Pedal Inputs 3 footswitch/continuous controller (all programmable)

Power supply External 9 volts DC or over USB

LCD Display

Data Entry Dial

Pitch and Mod joystick

8 Programmable knobs

9 Programmable sliders

8 Programmable buttons

5 Programmable Sequencer Buttons section

 

 

 

 

Dimensions: in. 37 x 13.8 x 4.7

(cm. 94,2 x 35 x 12,2)

Weight: lb. 26 (Kg. 11,8)

The VMK-161 plus Organ carton contains:

 

 

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Here's something I wish Fatar WOULD make: a B3-style controller with waterfall keys, the nine drawbars, perc/chorus switches and a leslie toggle that hangs off the edge. No sounds, just a controller. That one I'd buy in an instant to use with my B4.

 

http://fatar.com/Studiologic/Pages/VMK_161org.html

Technical Specifications

 

The VMK-161 plus Organ

 

Okay, you realize that the entire thread except the last 3 messages (up to and including yours) is from 2001, yes? :thu:

 

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Nobody ever reads this stuff. It's like you're going 80 on the interstate and suddenly you see a traffic jam in front of you.

 

The 5 suckers behind you will ram your car to shrapnel heaven regardless of you braking just in time.

 

It's like that.

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Okay, you realize that the entire thread except the last 3 messages (up to and including yours) is from 2001, yes? :thu:

 

That's OK. I'm usually talking to myself and drooling at some bar at this time of night (5:00 PM EST). Responding to 7-year old posts is an improvement.

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Okay, you realize that the entire thread except the last 3 messages (up to and including yours) is from 2001, yes? :thu:

 

That's OK. I'm usually talking to myself and drooling at some bar at this time of night (5:00 PM EST). Responding to 7-year old posts is an improvement.

 

 

:laugh:

 

Too funny.

 

I tried to warn everybody.

 

I did.

 

But sometimes it's interesting and rewarding to look back in time and see what we all were drooling over here on KC.

 

I guess that's why many of us save old Keyboard magazines.

 

We've come a long way since 2001. But why does it sometime seem as though we're still trodding along (and could do even better)? Izzit because if you read something on the 'net this morning, when you see the same news in the paper tomorrow you consider it what?... OLD NEWS.

 

Yeah.

 

And that makes 2001 seem like ANCIENT HISTORY.

 

The Kurzweil PC3X was old even before it was officially released. Why? Because we were hearing about news and features, sounds, and new OS capabilities and we were responding to them (and criticizing them) even though most of us had never seen the keyboard. So by the time it became available, we were already wishing for the next OS update. We're so spoiled. :rolleyes:

 

Ain't it cool? :thu:

 

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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