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Keyboards for live performing


joe_dup7

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I'd like to have a go at this one. I like the VA's, primarily because they typically have knobs, ribbons and arpeggiators. Also, unlike most romplers, they (and other modelled instruments) have a a strong emotional or visceral effect when morphing sound. My AN1x is a complete dud in the knob department (only 8), but to compensate, it has a an x-y ribbon, and a glorious morph feature which continuously morphs parameters from one patch to another. Also, most VA's have sophisticated mod-matrixes, which enable them to provide a wide variety of tonal color live. More colors and controls than most real analogs.

 

I just wish everything was smoother, and I do hope in the next generation, they will go beyound the analog paradigm (new waveforms, new processes, new types of filters, etc.)

 

I expect that Andromeda will set a new standard in live performance capability.

 

Can't wait to try it out.

 

Jerry

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Joe:

 

Based on your answer to steadyb's question, you should discount my first post by 50% (or more). I assumed.......sorry.

 

So, a second question. Are you looking for one convenient synth to do all the live performance duties you mentioned? Or will you be combining this synth with other gear you already are using?

 

Cheers,

 

Jerry

 

This message has been edited by Jerry Aiyathurai on 01-24-2001 at 02:35 PM

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I curently use two keyboards, an ASR-10

and a korg n5ex. I am thinking about replacing the n5 with an XP-60, and the ASR- with a Triton or preferably a K2500 because

I don't really like korgs anymore. I would really like to have a newer sampler because of the problem finding parts for the ASR. Are

there any other decent sampling keyboards you reccomend?

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Originally posted by joe:

I curently use two keyboards, an ASR-10

and a korg n5ex. I am thinking about replacing the n5 with an XP-60, and the ASR- with a Triton or preferably a K2500 because

I don't really like korgs anymore. I would really like to have a newer sampler because of the problem finding parts for the ASR. Are

there any other decent sampling keyboards you reccomend?

 

A K2500 might be an excellent choice for you.

 

It'll read all of your Ensoniq samples, although you'll have to do a bit of programming and tweaking to get them to sound the way that you want. Also, as you may have noticed, K2500's are way on sale these days.

 

The bottom line, though, is that you'll end up with a 76 key instrument that is certainly extremely well-suited for live performance. Besides having a plethora of real-time performance controls including a bunch of sliders, inputs for a host of footpedals and a cool-ass ribbon controller, it also happens to have an insanely powerful engine that is capable of doing just about anything that you can think of doing.

 

Of course, you should go and play with one for a while before spending any cash...your ears and hands should always be the judge.

 

One other note - don't let the 48 voice polyphony throw you. Kurzweil has the best, most musical way of handling voice stealing in the industry. Also, it is capable of generating four simple synth tones within a single voice, so it doesn't require the same stacking techniques as other synths to fatten it up.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I agree with Dave, get a deal on a used K2500 and you'll be rockin'. I've had my K2500RS for years (not for sale), and I love it. And then for pure synth "grab a knob, take a ride" fun, there's always Andromeda.

 

steadyb

 

...also known as Byron Gaither from Alesis

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Originally posted by joe:

I curently use two keyboards, an ASR-10

and a korg n5ex. I am thinking about replacing the n5 with an XP-60, and the ASR- with a Triton or preferably a K2500 because

I don't really like korgs anymore.

 

 

If I were you I'd keep the N5.. I really like its controller layout and how easy it is to set up splits and layers. The sounds are a tad lacking, but I think it's a great keyboard for live use since it's so easy to get around. You really need to take complexity into consideration when considering about a live axe, since a more complex board like an XP 60 or a Kurzweil requires you to be intimately involved in the way it creates a multitimbral performance and where the parameters you need to play with are. I like the Triton a lot because of this.. it's very easy to get deeply familiar with it while letting more of your brain concentrate on the music. Of course, it doesn't go as deep as the Kurzweil, and it unfortunately won't provide you with the kind of soundware compatibility and support as the K2500 will. If sampling (CDRom's and such) is important to you, definitely get the Kurzweil instead of the Triton.

 

In addition, you should consider that there's more than one reason why many keyboardists use 3 or more keyboards on stage - it helps to separate your instrumental roles by locking styles into different boards. It also helps to simplify your thinking and let you think more about the music than about the technology. I don't see many K2500's being played live, and that's partly because a lot of people don't like the all-in-one concept (although I admire you for not being one of them) and also because you have to be _really_ familiar with that baby to depend on it in a live situation. It's a shame, though, because of how many controllers it has.

 

I just realized that the PC2 may actually be a good idea for you: it has great pianos, organs, and brasses, and you can buy a ribbon expander for it for something insanely cheap like 60 bucks.

 

 

After all that.. I'm not sure anymore what my reccommendation is for you, but I do hope this information helps.

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K2500 comes first to mind.... and stays there. I think it would be a great option.

 

If you are looking for a dual keyboard setup... here are some options I would think about that are roughly similar in price.

 

Korg Z1 and Roland XP30 - Wide sound pallet, no sampler. I don't think of the z1 as a korg http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

Alesis QS synth and Waldorf XTK - Wide sound pallete with some ability to load your own sounds.

 

Hope this is of help.

 

Cheers,

 

Jerry

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I agree about the K2500... it's going to do just about everything you want. I also agree with the multi-board set-up; that way you never have to remember where the split-point is, etc. If you want to replace the N5 with a Roland, go with the XP30 unless you really want a sequencer. If you go with the Kurzweil, you really won't need the second sequencer, especially for live. If you want a dedicated analog-y board, you can try the Korg MS2000... it's also barely a Korg. It's comparatively inexpensive, and sounds great, but buy it from a dealer who offers a good exchange policy, and put it through it's paces the first couple of days.. there have been a few with problems right out of the box.

Bill Murphy

www.murphonics.com

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Although the guy above me is probably a Yamaha advert guy, the 9000 does look pretty impressive when you try it, and it has the plugs for small lamps - VERY good. The panel is the same as from any PSR home keyboard, though (those with speakers onboard), so it's probably more aimed at the piano-bar business than pro use. But the sounds, the OS and the features are definitely there. And I bet they're more modern than those on the K-2500.
Max Ventura, Italy.
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To throw in my $0.02... the live rig I swear by is a K2000 above a Yamaha S-80, with an organ simulator (mine's a VK-7) to one side. You may want more knobs to play with than this offers, which is why the K2500's faders are nice to have, although I've considered adding a Keyfax PhatBoy to my K2000. My fave thing about the S-80, BTW, is its electric piano sounds. Many are more realistic than any other ROM-based synth.

Stephen Fortner

Principal, Fortner Media

Former Editor in Chief, Keyboard Magazine

Digital Piano Consultant, Piano Buyer Magazine

 

Industry affiliations: Antares, Arturia, Giles Communications, MS Media, Polyverse

 

 

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Originally posted by argomax:

Although the guy above me is probably a Yamaha advert guy

 

No, I'm not, honest! I am a Yamaha fan, though - my synths include a DX7II, an SY77, a P80, and a CS6x. I'm currently struggling to decide what my next purchases will be. I'm searching for my "holy grail" live performing synth, which for me would have 88 weighted action keys, excellent piano sounds, really good modelled B3 sounds with all the accompanying goodies like drawbars, good Leslie simulation, and so on, great Rhodes and Wurly sounds, and an analogue synth built in with all the knobs. A sort of combination of a P200, a CX3, an S80, a PC2x, and an Andromeda, all in a small package that weighs 33 lbs and costs $2000. This doesn't exist, obviously, and maybe never will, but I keep searching. Even if I could get all this functionality in two keyboards, that wouldn't be bad.

 

I just mentioned the 9000 Pro because it has some of these qualities, although I realize the arranger keyboard baggage might turn off some pro users. The feature set of that synth does look good, though.

 

By the way, don't you think some piano bar-type acts can be considered pros? I guess it depends on how you define pro. Some of these guys make a living doing it, some might also be studio musicians or music teachers during the day. I don't want to get into an argument about it or anything, but curious about how you define pro.

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  • 8 months later...

Here I go again, reviving another old thread. It's not hard to tell that I am new here.

 

I have been using a Yamaha DX-7 II FD for about 10 years now, and it is showing its age. I'm one of those players who can make an accordian sound good, but have little or no clue how to program a synth. Despite this self-promoted compliment of myself (I apologize), I admit that the DX-7 has long since started to show it's age. I have midi'ed it to and old Korg P3 piano module and eq-ed the shit out of it. This works to a limited extent. I also use it midi'ed to an EMU Proteus module sometimes.

 

I am now using a Yamaha S80 (new toy ! Oh EE Oh !!) which has so many great acoustic piano and electric piano sounds in it, that I am now looking to the DX-7 II FD as the secondary midi-blended instrument. It will be used for the synthy sounding solos and applications like that. I feel that ultimately, I should be shelving the DX-7 for another keyboard controller midi'ed to a sampler. At that point, I think that I might be up to date again (that's again, for the first time!).

 

The Yamaha S80 is great for live gigs because it only takes a moment to get around from sound to sound.

 

I was also wondering (a question to those with the S80's)...

can those knobs or sliders be made to function as organ draw bars when using an organ patch? I hope this is not a stupid question.

 

I mainly play acoustic piano sounds and electric piano sounds.

 

After that, it would be organ, vibes, clavinet, and synthy sounds.

 

Thanks to anyone willing to respond to my post on such an old thread.

 

 

Steveedan

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