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Bad joke guitarists are telling about us!


humannoyed

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What do you do when your wife runs out of estrogen pills?

Just borrow some from the nearest keyboardist.

 

There is something bothering me that I am having a hard time articulating, and I am wondering if someone else has possibly thought about these things too regarding declining interest in keyboards and their strengths in artistic expression. These are my observations:

As interest in the guitar over the past several decades has skyrocketed, interest in keyboards has continued to decline. This decline has been so gradual that most people have forgotten that our parents and grandparents remember a time in the earlier part of last century when practically everyone played the piano at least a little, and accomplished players were not uncommon. Interest in the piano from the 19th century to the mid 20th century was huge.

Later as interest in the guitar grew and piano declined, we saw the piano still embraced mostly by the urbane upper-middle class and the guitar became embraced by everyone else (including many children of the upper-middle class). Of course since guitars are so much cheaper than pianos, this makes sense economically for the poorer classes, but interest in the guitar has also been fueled by its being equated with a rugged, unrefined earthiness and individualism that is a big part of the American cultural mystique, quite the opposite of urbanity. The revered pioneering heroes of the guitar have become the older generation of delta blues men, not classical guitarists or jazz masters. The blues guys are good examples of unrefined, rugged American individualism, putting raw feeling and emotion before form and technique. Rock guitarists have adopted this aesthetic, but the tough mystique has not escaped keyboardists either. Some of the most popular keyboardists in the last half of the 20th century treated their instruments in a very unrefined way, from unrelenting heavy-handed hammering out eighth notes to destroying keyboards on stage.

Although I would venture to guess that many Americans (at least males) are fighting our own inward (or outward?) battle of over domestication, many of us who are keyboardists may not feel the constant urge to use keys as our main reprimalizing tool (unlike many electric guitarists- ouch!! Touché guys! Just kidding). Perhaps instead of tough, rugged individuality some of us may feel the need to express what we have in common with others, a need for understanding, and yes, even tenderness (major 7th chord here, with added major 2nd on mellow piano)

It certainly doesnt help the integrity of the piano to be constantly overused in expressing sentimentality in scores for mass media productions. This one-sided, affected overuse almost makes one mistrustful of a pianos ability to adequately express masculine qualities by association, especially on a small console or spinet which are basically castrati of instruments with their short bass strings and limited dynamic range. No wonder there are keyboard jokes like: "What do you do when your wife runs out of estrogen pills? Just borrow some from the nearest keyboardist.

After playing a nice grand piano, which always gives back what you put into it, playing a piano patch on an un-weighted keyboard (or even many weighted action ones) can be frustrating. These instruments can often bottom-out or max out their velocity range with too little effort. A good instrument is capable keeping up with it player in its ability to express soft or loud, dark or bright, tender or tough, light or heavy, delicate or This is not necessarily a problem exclusive to touch sensitivity on keyboards either. Look at good organs. By manipulation of the stops (or drawbars) and swell pedal, a wide range of the delicate to powerful can be demonstrated.

A problem with synths is that the ranges of expression of dark to bright, soft to loud, etc. is completely programmable PER PATCH and may be hidden under some sub menu. This is different from a piano, which has a dynamic and tonal range that (if voiced/regulated well) always responds predictably and thus is learnable over years of practice. If you think about it, the response of fine pianos has been standardized to the point that a pianist can tour the world playing on different brands of instruments and still give comparable performances.

Plenty of knobs or sliders to manipulate tone and the programmability of an electronic keyboards level of touch sensitivity are wonderful features of course, but can add to performance difficulty by the shear number of parameters to manipulate. A musician who can adapt to a new instruments controllable parameters, discover its strengths, and effectively exploit those strengths is not unlike early composers for the piano, who exploited that instruments unique qualities that previous keyboards like the harpsichord and clavichord lacked.

(more later)

Any comments?

 

 

 

 

 

.

"It is a danger to create something and risk rejection. It is a greater danger to create nothing and allow mediocrity to rule."

"You owe it to us all to get on with what you're good at." W.H. Auden

 

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Well, consider this:

Playing a piano takes some commitment. One cannot simply sit down and hammer away. Technique, finesse and style are part of the process. Not so with guitar at the early stage. A lot of the sound and feel can come from distortion and other effects. In this day and age a lot of young musicians want instant results.

 

Additionally, with all the advances in technology, keyboard players have allowed themselves to be relegated back to the rhythm sections. When we're trying to cover brass parts, string parts, synth pads, etc., there's little room for fronting.

 

We allowed it to happen. In my band, no person did solos per se: we were allowed songs that would highlight your particular talent, and therefore, everybody got to front for a while. Even this can be troublesome. I remember when my band did ELPowell's Touch and Go. I had to cover the electronic drum sounds along with all the other parts. Made for a busy time, I can tell you.

 

Keyboard players generally have a little more theory too. I remember doing an song and telling the bass player to come in on the anacrucis (God, I can't believe I don't remember how to spell it. Time to get out the old Harvard Dictionary Of Music.) and he had no idea what I was talking about. Makes for some tough communications.

 

There's a point right there: How many non-keyboard players have even *heard* of the Harvard Dictionary?

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
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Originally posted by joegerardi:

I remember doing an song and telling the bass player to come in on the anacrucis and he had no idea what I was talking about.

 

I've been playing piano for over forty years, and I have no idea what an anacrucis is either, although it might have come up in a Royal Conservatory piano lesson several decades ago. Maybe you should consider speaking in a language that regular musicians can understand? ;-)

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Originally posted by humannoyed:

.....Although I would venture to guess that many Americans (at least males) are fighting ....

 

Oh boy, as a Dutch synthesizerplayer I am glad you leave me out of this discussion!

Playing a musical instrument means you are supposed to have FUN. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

That's what music is all about eh?

Or is this a non American testostoronic point of view?

 

 

------------------

-- Pim --

 

www.dancewave.nl

:keys: My Music:thx: I always wondered what happened after the fade out?
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Interesting thread.

 

One of the gifts my two year old got for Christmas is a little ($25) electronic keyboard. He know how to start rhythms, make noises, and dance to it. One day he may actually pick out a melody, or just sing on top of the (very hip sounding) accompaniment. It takes less commitment to 'sound musical' than a guitar.

 

Whether the kid will ever have the fortitude to master the piano is another matter. But purely on the question of instant musical gratification, I think the keyboard is better positioned than the guitar, today. The results of this better positioning may not be seen for another ten years, though.

 

Though I disagree on the instant music question, I agree with the overuse of tinkly "romantic piano." The first chord of the pathetique sonata, (C minor cluster) when sounded on a decent grand, is about as strong and authoritative as you could expect an instrument to get. I too, wish we could uncage the piano.

 

Maybe it is a problem of concentration. Delta blues, southern rock, etc. had a concentration of musicians who influenced each other, so that unique styles could be developed. Great rock keyboardists tend to be loners in the music making process (unlike the bebop jazzers). They often have formal training, and collaborate less. (sterotypes I know)

 

Perhaps what keyboardists need is a way to interact, that causes us to exchange ideas and develop new idioms for our (great) instruments.

 

Wait a minute... isn't that one of the objectives of this forum?

 

Cheers,

 

Jerry

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So, here's one to throw back at them:

 

Q: How do you get a guitarist to stop playing?

A: Put sheet music in front of him.

 

As a guitarist, bassist and keyboardist, I'm allowed to rip on nearly everyone in the band, guilt-free.

 

Q: What's the definition of an optimist?

A: A trombonist with a pager.

 

Apparently, I can also rip on others as well.

 

Look, you can't take this stuff with any degree of seriousness. Deep down, guitarists are somewhat jealous of pianists' ability to self accompany. I'd also venture to say that there are keyboardists who would like to emulate the earthiness of guitar playing. The bigger part of the picture is that the best music happens when the various components complement each other in ways that can't be achieved by one instrument alone. Yes, there will always be waves of increasing and decreasing popularity of an instrument based on where musical genres are headed. However, it wasn't all that long ago (like, less than 20 years) when people were bemoaning the loss of organic music and saying that synthesizers and samplers would replace all human participation in the creation of music. this is a natural ebb and flow in our society, and just when you think it will never switch back, the pedulum starts its long, slow swing in the other direction.

 

Q: What's a homeless person?

A: A drummer without a girlfriend.

 

Mark my words: there will be heroic synth players again. I just refuse to predict *when* this will be the case.

 

- Jeff, TASCAM Guy

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Here's a bad joke to tell about guitarists:

 

Q: How many guitar players does it take to change a lightbulb?

 

A: Three - one to do it, and two to shake their heads and say "Man, I could do that much better..."

 

I love light bulb jokes.

 

Q: How many folk singers does it take to change a light bulb?

 

A: Two - one to change the bulb, and one to write a song about the old bulb.

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

I think that there are still a lot of folks playing the piano. According to the numbers that I've seen, Piano and Organ dealerships are doing excellently - when was the last time you heard of a piano manufacturer going out of business? For that matter, how many musical instruments other than pianos (yeah, yeah,and organs - but they don't sell so many of those) have their own type of dealers and stores?

 

For me, as someone who has playing the piano and other assorted keyboards and things for over thirty years, there is definitely one reason that I do it above all others - I just love it to bits. I love to play - pure and simple. It's definitely my favorite thing to do. I play for myself first and foremost, and I find that if it makes me happy, it's more likely to reach others.

 

While it is true that I have managed to fashion a career where I can be knee-deep in gear a whole bunch of the time, I do my best to make sure that I don't take it so seriously that I lose sight of goal #1 - to enjoy myself. For me, when the joy goes away, the magic goes right along with it. For others, being serious about it may be what it takes for them to get what they want out of it. For me, it's a joy thing. Hey, what can I say - the Beatles are one of my main influences. Talk about a bunch of guys having fun...

 

In that light, it is my hope that anyone who has the slightest inclination to pick up a musical instrument of any kind indulges themselves and does so, whether that means taking piano lessons, digging that old guitar out of storage, banging on a bongo or buying a groove box or a $25 Casio.

 

It's fun - it feels good.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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How many other instruments can do as much as a good synth? How many other instruments have the dynamic and frequency range of a piano? This is such a flexible instrument. So what if it's not something you sling over your should like a rifle (except for my AX1, liberation anyone?). So what if it isn't phallic like (ie every Poison/ RAT/ etc video). Keyboards rock and anyone who says different can kiss my butt.

 

What is perfecr pitch?

When you throw the banjo in the dumpster and it lands on the accordion.

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Originally posted by wormhole:

So what if it isn't phallic like (ie every Poison/ RAT/ etc video). Keyboards rock and anyone who says different can kiss my butt.

 

I'm smelling what you're baking, mah brutha...

 

dB

Somewhat aggressive keyboard player http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I have to ask as well, i'm a 28 year old been playing for 24 years, classical, jazz, rock, fusion, theatre.

 

What the fuck is an anacrucis?

 

And, an oldie but a goodie:

 

What do you throw a drowning guitarist?

 

His Amp

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

 

This message has been edited by musow@hotmail.com on 01-17-2001 at 02:34 AM

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Originally posted by joegerardi:

Keyboard players generally have a little more theory too. I remember doing an song and telling the bass player to come in on the anacrucis (God, I can't believe I don't remember how to spell it. Time to get out the old Harvard Dictionary Of Music.) and he had no idea what I was talking about. Makes for some tough communications.

 

In North America, we tend to take 'anacrucis' quite literally - it is the upbeat of the conducting pattern. Perhaps it's best not to use conducting terms in an ensemble unless you have (or are) a conductor. It makes no sense to say 'when the conductor raises his/her hand you come in' if there's no conductor.

 

Perhaps, as the saying goes, a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing. When we yank terminology out of its context, we make it a pretext . . .

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I don't know of any instrument that can be mastered without dedication and study. Guitarists, bassists and drummers actually have a MORE DIFFICULT time learning their instruments. Mom and Dad aren't likely to give little Johnny or Jenny a Fender Precision, and you won't find a trap set in many living rooms.

 

Pianists profit from a long tradition of classical training materials. Other instrumentalists spend years separating good advice from crap. There's always a well-meaning tip (put chicken grease on your strings!) from an unqualified source, a boneheaded lick on the latest hit, an exercise in a video or a "technique" in a magazine that has little or no relevance out of context. These are the challenges that rhythm players face. Keyboard players have it easy.

 

The argument that keyboard players are educated and bassists (for example) are not holds no water whatsoever. There are musicians AND hackers playing every instrument. For every guitarist who can't read a chart, there's a keyboard, wind, or string player who couldn't improvise to save his life. Music directors, producers, and composers come from every instrumental background. Musicianship is not instrument dependent.

 

When I go to a party and see a piano, I'll ask if anyone plays. When I get a volunteer, I'll turn my back and ask them to play two notes in succession, anywhere on the keyboard. If they tell me what the first note is, I'll tell them the second by relative pitch. Or I'll have them play a chord, and if they tell me the root, I'll identify the rest of the notes. Not always, but in most cases, the piano player starts laughing that amazed laugh and asks me how I did it. It's not a difficult technique - it requires some ear training - but it's apparently too advanced for most keyboard players. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Guestuser wrote:

I've been playing piano for over forty years, and I have no idea what an anacrucis is either, although it might have come up in a Royal Conservatory piano lesson several decades ago. Maybe you should consider speaking in a language that regular musicians can understand? ;-)

 

And was joking, but it makes my point. "Regular musician"? Hell, proper terminology was the way I was taught, and I consider myself a "regular musician." If I were to tell the guitarist that we were mutating to the fifth during the bridge, it's only because that was what I learned it to be, not because I'm trying to look intelligent. It also defines the way I'm going to play that section. In any field, there are specific terms that define the rules of the field. We learn them and use them when we need to.

 

I don't want to start a flame war here, but I simply don't understand.

 

Do we then reduce it all to the language that a drummer can understand? http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif You know, for "upbeat" we say "The beat before you hit the kick drum?"

 

Some of my favorite musician jokes:

Q: What did the drummer get on his IQ test?

A: Drool.

 

Q: Whats the difference between an orchestra and a bull?

A: In the bull, the horns are in the front and the ass is in the back.

 

Q: What's the difference between a chain saw and a guitar?

A: Vibrato.

 

Q: What's the range of a guitar?

A: About 50 feet with a good arm.

 

DanSouth:

Remember, I said generally. There are exceptions to each rule. And hell, I remember a flautist that could do what you do and name all the notes without being told the root. She had absolute relative pitch. Anyone (regardles of instrument) that has formal - and I mean formal training can do what you do at parties. It's called ear training and was required courseware in college for me.

 

I'm not saying that to knock down your arguments, but to point out there's way too many musicians out there that are products of playing from "feel." That is not a bad thing, and yet, if someone does take formal lessons, theory is required. Just learning scales requires that one learns the Circle of Fifths, hence that becomes part of the student's vocabulary.

 

To me, there is no difference between a band and an orchestra. If a drummer is counting off the start of a song, and someone comes in on the upbeat, then that is an anacrusis. The drummer is acting as the conductor, and we follow his/her lead.

 

Lord, this is getting out of hand quickly! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

 

This message has been edited by joegerardi on 01-18-2001 at 10:45 AM

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
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I think Anna Crusis is a good stage name for an upbeat female musician.

"It is a danger to create something and risk rejection. It is a greater danger to create nothing and allow mediocrity to rule."

"You owe it to us all to get on with what you're good at." W.H. Auden

 

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Dansouth wrote:

 

Pianists profit from a long tradition of classical training materials. Other instrumentalists spend years separating good advice from crap.

 

Keyboard education suffers from a long tradition of rote learning. Playing by ear has not been encouraged for fear that a student will not learn to read or, even more likely, because the piano teacher doesnt her/himself play by ear. You of course cant teach what you dont know.

Also in traditional teaching there is the notion that the printed note is sacred. Pieces are to be played exactly as written. The assumption that there is little chance the student could improve upon what the master clearly wrote down is beside the point. Children are naturally creative. To stifle that in hope that the student will come to appreciate the creativity of the composer usually has the opposite effect. Students learn to hate piano lessons and most quit. Those who continue have learned the lesson: play only what is written, nothing more and nothing less.

This is not the way other arts(like visual) are taught, and not the way one is expected in our culture to learn guitar, bass or drums. These instruments have accepted different tradition: learning by ear and improvising. This is why these instruments have become more popular to young learners. It is more about improvisational interaction with other musicians, which is exciting and fun. It is not about practicing piano alone memorizing pieces note for note to be performed solo in front of a critical audience.

 

Guitarists, bassists and drummers actually have a MORE DIFFICULT time learning their instruments. Mom and Dad aren't likely to give little Johnny or Jenny a Fender Precision, and you won't find a trap set in many living rooms.

 

Most parents probably do cringe at the thought of having a drum set in the house. I think however, after checking on the prices of pianos verses guitars and basses, many parents decide to go with what Johnny or Jenny probably wanted in the first place (a guitar or bass) to test their musical aptitude and commitment before the bigger investment in a piano. Guitar is so prominent in popular music, it has become the instrument of aspiration for most young folks-just look at sales statistics.

 

When I go to a party and see a piano, I'll ask if anyone plays. When I get a volunteer, I'll turn my back and ask them to play two notes in succession, anywhere on the keyboard. If they tell me what the first note is, I'll tell them the second by relative pitch. Or I'll have them play a chord, and if they tell me the root, I'll identify the rest of the notes. Not always, but in most cases, the piano player starts laughing that amazed laugh and asks me how I did it. It's not a difficult technique - it requires some ear training - but it's apparently too advanced for most keyboard players

 

Ouch, ouch, ouch! Well, many church players I know have pretty incredible ears. In fact there is a strong tradition of playing keys by ear in certain segments of church music despite the best earadication plans of many piano teachers. I have known many other keyboardists though who could only play what they memorized from printed music. Sounds like youve been partying with those folks.

"It is a danger to create something and risk rejection. It is a greater danger to create nothing and allow mediocrity to rule."

"You owe it to us all to get on with what you're good at." W.H. Auden

 

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Originally posted by humannoyed:

Children are naturally creative. To stifle that in hope that the student will come to appreciate the creativity of the composer usually has the opposite effect.

 

This is a very good point. Many people who have learned piano in the traditional manner picked up good technical habits but seem to have little interesting in thinking - and playing - outside of the box. After a while, they accept their role as a performer of the written note, rather than as a musician. But not everyone falls into this category. Perhaps there are good teachers out there who teach theory and musicianship in addition to finger exercises and reading skills. I had to learn it on my own. Playing by ear was frowned upon, to say the least.

 

Most parents probably do cringe at the thought of having a drum set in the house. I think however, after checking on the prices of pianos verses guitars and basses, many parents decide to go with what Johnny or Jenny probably wanted in the first place (a guitar or bass) to test their musical aptitude and commitment before the bigger investment in a piano. Guitar is so prominent in popular music, it has become the instrument of aspiration for most young folks-just look at sales statistics.

 

Many families don't have to buy a piano, because they already own one. In other cases, the parent is more likely to buy a band instrument (clariner, trombone, etc.) Kids get guitars and basses when they decide that that's what THEY want, and when they raise enough hell that the parents can no longer refuse.

 

Ouch, ouch, ouch! ...

 

Of course, I was being facetious. The idea that pianists can't learn relative pitch is ludicrous. In fact, the pianist has a better opportunity to learn theory than any other instrumentalist. But as you stated, it's not part of most people's training unless they study piano in college. As I said, there are musicians AND hackers playing EVERY instrument. I was just trying to make a point in a humorous way.

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playing an instrument, whatever the instrument may be requires a lot of time. we all know this already because we're (for the most part) all musicians... its a good point to say that a lot of the new "musician's" want instant gratification when playing a new instrument... this is why we had the boom of DJs all of a sudden... anyone can spend mommy's credit card to buy a couple of turntables, a mixer, and some records... as soon as you get home from DJ MUSIC WORLD CONNECTION (i just made that up) you can be mixing tunes and impressing your friends, getting all the ladies, etc. but those people will never get as far as true musicians that have practiced their art for years, even decades. one day there will be a renewal of appreciation and presitge that a keyboard player had in the past. its gotten to the point that when people think of a keyboard player, they think of someone who doesn't even make his/her own music... but instead has everything preset from the factory... that truly is a shame.

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Forum for the Media Arts

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Regarding formal musical terms and who is or is not a "regular" musician:

 

We should remember that musical theory, notation and terms are simply devices that we use to describe or explain things and characteristics that exist whether we know their "formal" names or not. IMHO, many of the most naturally talented musicians DON"T know the technical terms, because they discovered these characteristics on their own, and understand them in their own way.

 

Complex music exists and thrives in many cultures without official formal musical "structures," and indeed did so in the West long before our formal theory and notation took hold. The name is not the thing, and you can know the thing without knowing the name.

 

Finally a joke:

 

Q: How can you tell if the stage is level?

 

A: The drummer drools out of BOTH sides of his mouth.

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One in our favor...

 

How many keyboardists does it take to change a light bulb?

 

Only one, and furthermore, s/he can do it while standing in an impossibly tiny space, with no monitor.

Stephen Fortner

Principal, Fortner Media

Former Editor in Chief, Keyboard Magazine

Digital Piano Consultant, Piano Buyer Magazine

 

Industry affiliations: Antares, Arturia, Giles Communications, MS Media, Polyverse

 

 

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Another one in our favor:

 

How many bass players does it take to change a lightbulb?

None - keyboard players can do it with their left hand.

 

...and one more for the bass players:

 

How many Nashville bass players does it take to change a lightbulb?

1...5...1...5...1...5...

 

Okay, I'll stop now....

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I may get sort of offensive here, but on the other hand, I'm sure some of you would agree with me. Back to the original topic, I took up playing the piano only because none of my friends could play it. The keyboard is a timeless instrument and the less people that can play it, the happier I am. I agree, it takes much more time, but is much more rewarding as well and all the world's greatest musicians were keyboard players anyway. Hendrix or Beethoven? If you dare think Hendrix, you need to take a Music Appreciation course and watch the movie Immortal Beloved. Hey, I respect guitarists and other instrument players, but there is no question that the best musicians are the keyboard players (sorry nonkeyboardists) and I say this only because the dedication that must go into the keyboard is more than any other instrument. This is sort of obvious, but since a piano ranges 7 octaves, it is one of the very few instruments that can play rhythm and melody at the same time (the only other instruments that can do that are keyboard based anyway) so while my friends try to impress others by playing Metallica riffs, I blow them away by playing the 3rd Movement of Moonlight Sonata and everyone remains completely silent in the room from awe when I'm finished. The sense of pride is unbelievable. No other instrument that I know of can give you this sense of accomplishment. Long live the piano, unarguably the greatest instrument of all time.
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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

Another one in our favor:

 

How many bass players does it take to change a lightbulb?

None - keyboard players can do it with their left hand.

 

...and one more for the bass players:

 

How many Nashville bass players does it take to change a lightbulb?

1...5...1...5...1...5...

 

Okay, I'll stop now....

 

dB

 

I shouldn't really add this but just to prove that we can laugh at ourselves (in those rare moments when the drummer isn't being entertaining)...

 

Did you hear about the bass player who purchased a 5 - string bass and then returned it the next day complaining that the strap was too tight !

 

Ha ha

 

Bassment

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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

Another one in our favor:

 

How many bass players does it take to change a lightbulb?

None - keyboard players can do it with their left hand.

 

Ouch! I'm scorched, and I'm only 33% bassist.

 

- Jeff

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Originally posted by DOS:

The keyboard is a timeless instrument and the less people that can play it, the happier I am.

 

I don't understand this statement. If fewer people (not less people) play the piano, it's not going to a timeless instrument. It's going to be a museum piece. Having many players contributes to the breadth of styles of piano music available. How can you say you love the instrument when you want fewer people to play it?

 

I agree, it takes much more time, but is much more rewarding as well and all the world's greatest musicians were keyboard players anyway. ... Hey, I respect guitarists and other instrument players, but there is no question that the best musicians are the keyboard players (sorry nonkeyboardists) and I say this only because the dedication that must go into the keyboard is more than any other instrument. This is sort of obvious, but since a piano ranges 7 octaves, it is one of the very few instruments that can play rhythm and melody at the same time...

 

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but this is a difficult position to sell. Try playing a violin or a trumpet. Try making a room full of people dance with an upright bass. Than come back and tell us that the piano takes the most dedication.

 

After two years of practice, a piano student can play many pieces, and they'll enjoy a full, rich tone from very early on. After the same two years, the violinist will just be starting to be able to play in tune. Good tone will take years longer. Playing the trumpet is like lifting weights with your face. Again, it takes many years just to get a decent tone out of the instrument. Not so on piano. Bassists and drummers have to be able to master time and groove more than other instrumentalists. Why? Because the others often have the bassist and the drummer to lean on.

 

Yes, the piano can play different parts at the same time, but so can the organ, the guitar, even some percussionists. Watch a good drummer or percussionist if you like complex performance skills.

 

In terms of pianists being the best musicians, where would you classify Vivaldi, a violinist? Visit your local symphony or chambre ensemble. Every musician on the stage is highly accomplished. How can you argue to the contrary? Go see a cello concerto; notice the physical demands of a virtuoso performance on THAT difficult instrument. And consider the musical requirements of the conductor, who must know the function of each instrument in the orchestra, who must memorize every part in the score, and who must direct each section differently because of the varying note attack times of each instrument. Perhaps we can ALL use some more "music appreciation".

 

Hendrix or Beethoven? If you dare think Hendrix, you need to take a Music Appreciation course and watch the movie Immortal Beloved.

 

Music appreciation course? Yes. Immortal Beloved? No. It's a lovely film but rather fanciful in the history department. I don't think people consider Hendrix to be on the same level as Beethoven, but then he died very young, so who knows? Beethoven revolutionized the symphony and the piano sonata. Jimi revolutionized the application of a relatively new instrument, the electric guitar. Both have influenced countless followers, but their influences are in different areas of music, so it's difficult to contrast their contributions from a comparative standpoint.

 

while my friends try to impress others by playing Metallica riffs, I blow them away by playing the 3rd Movement of Moonlight Sonata and everyone remains completely silent in the room from awe when I'm finished. The sense of pride is unbelievable. No other instrument that I know of can give you this sense of accomplishment.

 

Like it or not, different audiences react to different styles of music. Sonata fans may run screaming from a Metallica concert, but heavy metal fans will fall asleep at a piano recital. That's why different styles exist. Everyone has different tastes and preferences.

 

Sense of accomplishment? Try singing - no instrument, just you and a microphone. Moving an audience with your voice is like no other experience on earth.

 

Long live the piano, unarguably the greatest instrument of all time.

 

The piano is a beautiful instrument; I won't argue with that. But what if all music were piano music? Wouldn't that be rather dull and monotonous? To appreciate the role and function of each instrument in an orchestra, try writing or arranging some music for an ensemble. If you're a keyboardist, you can test your arrangements with a MIDI sequencer. I think you'll quickly gain an appreciation for your fellow instrumentalists, as well as the brilliant composers, orchestrators, conductors, and producers who bring all of those disparate elements together to create a moving musical performance.

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Give me a B3 and a pair of 122 Leslies and I'll take on a good guitarist anyday :P

 

Then give me a good baby grand and I'll steal his woman too http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

JW

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