Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

What's the matter with kids these days?


Recommended Posts

And people in general...are they STUPID or brain dead or what?

 

After our gig the other night, I stopped in at my son's "After Prom"...an event put on by the school to keep the kids from getting pregnant or killed by drunk drivers or what not...actually, a good idea...and a neat event. Lotsa food and entertainment...but...

 

There was a band playing. Some kids who'd graduated the year before. Hey, they're getting pretty good! I was impressed, especially since I've been watching their evolution from somewhat shaky beginnings a couple of years ago.

 

Well, they're playing the stuff that my kids get into...heavy alternative with a few classic rock tunes thrown in. And NO ONE IS PAYING A BIT OF ATTENTION. An auditorium full of high school kids, and no one cares. And, like I said, they weren't sucking by any stretch.

 

When I was in high school, if you played something at the school, everyone was digging on it. WHAT'S WITH THIS APATHY ABOUT LIVE MUSIC?! I've noticed it elsewhere. Or is everyone in our town hiding a lobotomy scar? (I wouldn't doubt it...)

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 64
  • Created
  • Last Reply

What's the matter with PEOPLE these days?

 

As a live performer, I see it all the time. Everything is now background music. A hundred years ago, virtually all music heard was live. You either listened/watched a performance, or joined in to make music. Music was special. Now, music is so omnipresent, it's no longer special to encounter it during one's day.

 

It's worse than ever, living in a modern world of endless sensory input. Music emnanates from cars, TVs, in stores, and it all blends into the background. Everyone's multi-tasking, with the CD player going while the TV's on, playing a video game while talking on the phone. It all becomes part of the background noise. (It doesn't help that so many classic songs have been reduced to sound bite jingles--all the more reason to relegate even rock n roll to the background.)

 

Nowadays, people pay $8 for a movie ticket so they can sit in a theater and talk for two hours.

 

I went to a Pat Metheny concert. This is a jazz concert, here. And two people directly behind me yakked the entire time. (Let's see, $30 times two equals $60 for two hours of vapid dialogue. They should have gone to a movie instead....)

 

 

People are so used to IGNORING and tuning out everything, they no longer know how to pay attention.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

get roni size up in there or any other big name dj and watch the kids go apeshit!

 

the times are changing and it is definitely different from back in the day.

 

but maybe his story will repeat itself....and live music will become cool again.

thats where i'd put my money....but only time will tell.

 

"fuzz"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definetly it seems live music is not cool anymore. Not if it's not accompaigned by fireworks, a blinding light show, and plenty of dancing. And, a lot of the popular music nowadays can't really be played live.

 

Ted- I'm probably somewhere between you and your kids in terms of age, and live music WAS cool when I was high school. I had a band, and most of the people wouldn't miss one of our concerts. In fact, we had 2 main bands in my HS and they always wanted at least one of us to play in parties and shit... We actually didn't play a few since we didn't like to repeat our set lists too much.

 

And I agree with Eric... we live in a day of sensory stimuli orgy, and of the 5 second attention span. No more sitting back and enjoying the moment.

 

Plus, I gotta say one thing. A lot of concerts that I've been in this country were lame in terms of people enjoying the music and feeling the vibe. I didn't go to a rock concert where I had to sit in a CHAIR till I got here. Not all of them are like this, but an annoyingly majority it seems. Flame me all you want, but other cultures (apparently) know how to enjoy a concert much more. Maybe times have changed and I missed the 'good times'. I sure hope so.

 

Rod

Korg Kronos X73 / ARP Odyssey / Motif ES Rack / Roland D-05 / JP-08 / SE-05 / Jupiter Xm / Novation Mininova / NL2X / Waldorf Pulse II

MBP-LOGIC

American Deluxe P-Bass, Yamaha RBX760

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have no fucking idea. i have been to many shows where people are going apeshit, i've got video to prove it. oddly most of the people there are my age [28] give or take 5 years.

 

man, they are in high school... they got better things to do like get pregnant and smoke some crack http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif than watch a band play. bands werent big at my high school either, they even had the whole "battle of the bands" and not many people would show up, school sponsored events just aint where its going down. every so often a house party would get a band but mainly relied on stereo for music to keep the cops away from what would be an alcohol soaked house.

 

ive been to shows lately where the band is smoking but not many people out to see it, kinda like a tree in the forest...

alphajerk

FATcompilation

"if god is truly just, i tremble for the fate of my country" -thomas jefferson

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think its geographics and culture. In San Diego the people adore the local band scene and support it with an intensity that Ive never seen before.

 

I also heard that Europeans go apeshit over pretty much anything live.

"Meat is the only thing you need beside beer! Big hunks of meat and BEER!!...Lots of freakin' BEER."

"Hey, I'm not Jesus Christ, I can't turn water into wine. The best I can do is turn beer into urine." Zakk Wylde

 

http://www.hepcnet.net/bbssmilies/super.gif

http://smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/15_1_109.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the issue here is not how many people show up, or whether they sit or dance, but whether they even pay attention.

 

It's the utter indifference, real or perceived. People often don't even bother to clap--even the pretending-to-be-polite golf clap. (They're not even paying enough marginal attention to fake clap during the pauses between songs the way they used to.)

 

I've been doing more and more gigs where I wonder why they even bother to have bands at all.

 

It's almost come to this: If there's a band, no one pay's attention to it, but if there's no band, then "The place was dead--they didn't even have a band."

 

WANTED: Really hot band to stand unobtrusively in corner of room playing background music quietly enough so everyone can talk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to a Medeski Martin and Wood concert the other day. People were dancing, eyes closed, across the auditorium. Those who had their eyes open were definitely not talking much. I know some rich northeastern US kids who travelled to Tokyo so they could catch Phish there. (Yes they travel to get to them in the US, too.) I suspect these jam bands are on to something.

 

I just think that people can see through the midi and audio automation that bands are doing to recreate the "hits", note for note. When I was growing up musically the ability to faithfully reproduce a hit was of great value. Now that has become cheap. When musicians take risks again, and create new music every night, I think people will listen.

 

Respectfully,

 

Jerry

 

------------------

www.tuskerfort.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this past weekend we played at a hotel bar that was about half full of locals...maybe 70 people or so. nobody was leaving but the apathy was absolutely amazing. we pretty much cover every genre in our band, so we were ending HUGE songs such as "Don't Stop Believin'," "Unchained Melody," and "You're a God" and it was so fucking quiet you could hear a pin drop. talk about an ego buster. we even did dance stuff the first set like "superstition" and "wild west" and the floor was empty. funny thing was, we opened the second set with "brickhouse" and of course, the floor filled up.

 

i've come to the conclusion that aside from very rare circumstances, it doesn't matter how good you are, how good you sound, or how sharp you look, unless you play "brickhouse," "funky music white boy," "jungle boogie," and "shake your bon bon" you WILL suck. oh, and "enter sandman" for the "HEAVY" sound (here is where i barf).

 

that's just the local market that's been spoonfed the above material for the past 6 years or so. i'd love to whip out some EWF/Midnight Star/Grandmaster Flash on these bastids and listen to the silence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Americans are in overload. We have 120 channels of tv, thirty or more FM stations, fast food from hell, and everybodies chasin a buck. Live music is appreciated by young folks, my son is 17 and he goes to every live music event he can. You have to realize that dumbing down is the norm for alot of the kids. They get joked for being eclectic, They get joked for being smart, they get joked for being passionate about artistry, they get joked for the clothes they wear, they get joked for being a virgin.....it goes on and on. Both of my kids have a varied pallete for music, food, outdoor activities, etc. And they hang out with kids like them. My daughter's CD of the week is another one out of my CD case.....Storyville. I am quite sure nobody else her age at school listens to that.....but she does, and digs it. My son has an encylopedic knowledge of 60's and 70's rock, all the old blues cats, jazz fusion groups, bluegrass, classical, and sadly (for me) hip hop. So I guess at a school dance, with a live band, playing to an audience whose attention span is interrupted by the next hottie of the opposite sex walking by........get the picture? Ha Ha!!!! Let's just hope our love of REAL music, of LIVE music is inherited by our kids, who'll pass that to their kids as well. Let's hope.
Down like a dollar comin up against a yen, doin pretty good for the shape I'm in
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last 4 or 5 times I've gone to a bar to hear a live band, I have been severely disappointed by the quality of the music. Poor playing ability, long breaks between songs, ear-piercing and unbalanced sound mixes - total non-professionalism is rampant in our local live music scene, in my view. Shiny new, beautiful instruments and amps, though.

 

As an audience member, I can't and won't respond to a band that doesn't play really well and have its act together.

 

Similarly, when I do my coffee-house semi-acoustic semi-jazz thing, they applaud when I play well, and they ignore me if I don't. This is no more or less than I expect.

 

Live music of superior quality will always find an audience. But there needs to be a match between what the audience wants/expects and what the performer provides. If you are playing well and they're not responding, you're playing for the wrong audience, or in the wrong venue - or perhaps you're not playing as well as you think you are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, just my rant contribution:

Go to a live performance of a 'name' band at something small like a concert hall. If you know anything about the particular music, you can identify the song in about 2 notes. Why do these so called fans sit silent for 2 bars of intro then scream and clap when the lead singer starts so now I can't hear a f*ing thing? Like "... ???? .. oh yeah, that's the one on the radio!"

Is it that they only identify songs by lyrics or they think the band consists of a lead singer with some 'droids in the background? Maybe I just prefer the music because I couldn't recite the lyrics to even my favourite songs.

 

Tedster, people are lemmings.

Geez, I listen to Howard Stern during my commute because 'The Edge' FM station is now so 'edgy' they play the same song at exactly the same time every f*ing morning for 2 weeks. (The Tea Party - Doors wannabees).

I'm done.

It's OK to tempt fate. Just don't drop your drawers and moon her.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fet said:

 

>>>Live music of superior quality will always find an audience. But there needs to be a match between what the audience wants/expects and what the performer provides. If you are playing well and they're not responding, you're playing for the wrong audience, or in the wrong venue - or perhaps you're not playing as well as you think you are.

 

 

Well, Fet...as I mentioned in my opening statement, these kids sounded pretty good. Certainly better than I expected.

 

It does depend on the audience. Maybe you're fortunate enough to have an audience that's appreciative of good playing...but realistically, I've heard a lot of good bands (and I'd like to think I can differentiate between bad-mediocre-okay-not shabby-good- and ass kicking) that were good or better, and no one listens, and then another band of lesser stature takes the stage and for whatever reason, maybe they've got a sucky guitar player but he falls down in convulsions during his solos...people go apeshit.

 

We've had other bands come and check us out when we've played and they're digging what we do and very vociferous in their support. I figure the musicians, especially those in decent bands, should be able to tell if something sucks or not. So if the musicians are digging us and the rest of the crowd ain't paying attention, I figure it's "the masses are asses" problem.

 

>>>But there needs to be a match between what the audience wants/expects and what the performer provides.

 

And this is it. The audiences don't know what the hell they want...if anything.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read about a 70s Elvis Presley show where nobody was reacting - El did all his best tricks but the audience stayed stone cold dead - finally he started pulling people up onto the stage and GIVING THEM HIS JEWELRY - handing out gold and diamonds worth literally tens of thousands of dollars to lucky audience members. That finally got them going - I'll have to try that next time I play.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, they're playing the stuff that my kids get into...heavy alternative with a few classic rock tunes thrown in.

 

I suspect this was the problem...the kids see and hear this stuff everyday on the radio or MTV. My nephew's heavy Punk/Rock band drives kids nuts...there playing stuff kids don't hear everyday.

 

I did a show fairly recently at a "Kiddie Club" where most of the kids were ages 15-17...we did our show...crazy funk/jam/jazz...the kids rushed the stage and didn't sit down for our entire set.

 

It's about the music...interesting music played with confidence and heart will get almost any audience every time. It's unfortunate there's less opportunities for kids to see bands like this these days.

 

At least that's my experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Live music of superior quality will always find an audience. But there needs to be a match between what the audience wants/expects and what the performer provides. If you are playing well and they're not responding, you're playing for the wrong audience, or in the wrong venue - or perhaps you're not playing as well as you think you are."

 

we play pretty good. as far as what the audience expects - the clubs we play at are dance clubs and for the most part we play dance music and do very well with that. we don't waltz into a country bar and play jennifer lopez songs. in fact, we play just about every weekend, which is what made it even more strange when we were funkgodallstars the weekend before at xyz club, but at hotel bar, got stared at very hard.

 

i think it all comes back to 2 things. as an audience your inspiration gets beaten down by expecting to hear the same thing from every band week after week. so if you hear "jungle love" but were expecting "jungle boogie," you may be inclined to stay seated and glare at the band. the funniest thing was at this same bar, after we had played "smooth," "my girl," "superstition," "wild west," "celebration," etc, some floozie with big hair and blue eyeshadow came up after the first set and said "why doncha play some Dance Music?"

 

the other thing is that we DID have a pretty full dance floor after the start of the second set. which leads me to believe that all these people needed was another beer. or five.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has the whole world copped the LA attitude.

 

I am with Ted regarding the youth market. Seems a bigger and bigger percentage of these Kids want something for nothing and have attention spans no longer than an ant. THANK YOU MTV. Just look at how quick the cuts are and how little it has to do with music. What message is that sending??

I have played to many warm audiences outside of LA - mainly Orange County. These people seem to really dig live music. As soon as you get back into Hollywood - the asshole light goes bright red. I am sure that is true in many other metro areas - I know Dallas has a problem with this also.

 

After 15+ years of playing live I will say that either I aint the same or they aint the same or both....

 

BK http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

 

 

This message has been edited by BK on 05-10-2001 at 07:02 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>>>we had played "smooth," "my girl," "superstition," "wild west," "celebration," etc, some floozie with big hair and blue eyeshadow came up after the first set and said "why doncha play some Dance Music?"

 

Like I said...the masses are asses. And we're trying to impress THEM? We were playing a gig a month ago. Some hot looking babe in "poured-in" blue jeans came up and requested....ready?

 

THE F^ING CHICKEN DANCE!!!!

 

And I looked, but I couldn't see the lobotomy scar. Good surgeon, I guess.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I know Dallas has a problem with this also."

 

I've been playing every weekend in Dallas for the past couple of years. Since January, I've been taking a break and I find myself less frustrated. My friends that continue to play are still having a tough time- playing great shows for no one.

I think Dallas (like LA) is too spread out. Its hard to have a scene when everyone lives so far away from each other. Not to mention, a majority of people prefer to dance at the disco rather than listen to live music.

The (rock) scene that does exist in Dallas is controlled by the local weekly and a handful of club owners. Of course, quality rises to the top, right?

Do I sound as bitter as I feel? I hope so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know what it's other f**king musicians that are the worst for this! When I go to see another band if it's good I'm totally dancing and into it, but when most other musicians come to see my band, even if they dig the music they're usually too afraid to look uncool and get into it. It's really pathetic.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trickfall,

You raise an interesting point, but i wonder if people (musicians included) really consider live music as a time of celebration or even realize they can get involved.

These days, when people want to dance, they go to a dance club, right?.

I don't think people remember live music is a time to get down and dirty.

I know these are broad statements and someone will have anecdotal evidence to prove me wrong, but...

 

its all about the DJ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Woweee, do I have a really different perspective! I go to Koo's Cafe in Anaheim, Spaceland in Silverlake, The Smell in downtown Los Angeles, etc. and these kids are really into the music. Lots of people who are either in high school or in their twenties, mostly, and they're really into it. The Silverlake Lounge -- people seem to be into the gigs there when i show up for these things. For some of the Los Cincos shows, the Beachwood Sparks shows, same thing -- people would show up, groove, dance, bob their heads, tap their feet, and generally be into it.

 

The hardcore kids are really into the music, with a VERY supportive scene. Give people something that they're really into, and they'll like it. People are definitely into the DJs as well, but you know, I'm seeing all sorts of people who are really into live music. Even the experimental shows -- granted, people have never shown up en masse for a lot of experimental shows, but still -- the people who DO show up are listening, they're paying attention, they're into it, they're supportive.

 

I saw the Arizona-based band Scenic at Spaceland, and people were mesmerized, entranced -- couldn't stop listening, and there was a huge line to purchase their CDs afterwards.

 

Saw Live to Experience at The Martini Lounge, and the same thing -- big line to purchase their CDs afterwards.

 

Went to a Julieta Venegas concert at the Knitting Factory. People were screaming for her, singing along to all her lyrics, and just really into it. Same with the acts that went on before her. U2 shows -- sure are a LOT of young people singing along to every song...Ozzfest -- same thing...KROQ Weenie Roast, Coachella in Indio (a lot of the electronic bands had full bands or were full bands to begin with)...

 

The people who have shown up for our shows at the Knitting Factory, Spaceland, The Whisky, The Baked Potato, even The Joint were enthusiastic. We don't pack 'em in because we're just starting out, but you know, people generally pay attention. We play ethereal, atmospheric music, too, so it's not like we are a really loud band, but people are still paying attention, at the very least.

 

I see this sort of thing at big festival shows -- people yakking, talking on cell phones, that kind of thing -- so maybe you guys are talking about that and not clubs? Maybe I'm not going to the "right" clubs? Do a lot of you really feel that it's a generational thing, adn that people nowadays just don't like live music? Do you really think that MTV is responsible for this (we'll discount the fact that many people in their 30s grew up with MTV since MTV started in 1980)? Do you feel it's because a lot of younger people listen to rap (which i'm sure a lot of you dislike, just as your parents may have disliked hard rock or whatever)?

 

------------------

Ken/Eleven Shadows/d i t h er/nectar

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

music*travel photos*tibet*lots of stuff

"Sangsara" "Irian Jaya" & d i t h er CDs available!

http://www.elevenshadows.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of the folks posting here seem to be saying, if the audience doesn't like the music our band's playing, they are stupid. I wonder how long companies that make products that people don't buy would last if that was their attitude? As for laughing about someone wanting to hear 'dance music'..most of the songs listed are 30 years old. If this was 1965 and you were playing 'dance music' from 1935, do you think people would care about your superior musicianship, or would they just want to hear some Twist music?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by mojo_jojo:

Trickfall,

You raise an interesting point, but i wonder if people (musicians included) really consider live music as a time of celebration or even realize they can get involved.

These days, when people want to dance, they go to a dance club, right?.

I don't think people remember live music is a time to get down and dirty.

I know these are broad statements and someone will have anecdotal evidence to prove me wrong, but...

 

its all about the DJ.

 

Mojo,

 

Could you mean Dale Brock and his collection of assholes at 214 management. - The Dallas observer. - Robert Wolonski(sp).

 

Granted Trees and The Curtian Club are great rooms but come on man they aint the fucking ritz. In 1995 I was in a band that was being courted by Sony. They still wouldn't give us a weekend slot at Trees and we were selling out the revolution... (where the coppertank is now). I can only figure that we weren't into the drug scene like all of the power that be....

 

Shadows and Steve:

I must clarify myself - quite a few places in Hollywood just plain suck BUT,

One of the real shining moments for myself though would be the MINT. A great room with really cool people running the joint.

 

Orange County -

The Galaxy

The Coachhouse

 

Both great places with great crowds.

 

I guess what is really frustrating is the MUSO attitude. Musicians of all people should be supporting the act onstage. They know what its like to be Knocking 'em dead and get DICK for crowd response.

 

This is why AUSTIN TX is shinning star. I have had nothing but great experiences with the musicians and people there. Maybe it was just the contact High..... http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

I do miss TEJAS!!! but I will take the Cali weather anyday!

 

BK http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Talking about the KIDS (children) and their culture (or lack of it), the most of the responsibility is ours as parents and musicians.

 

My son is 3 years old. Of course, I let him to see and listen whatever he wants right now (including Disney Tunes and Barney) and thanks God he is also interested in my music and studio things (you should see him playing and singing with my old Casio RAPMAN).

 

I am sure in a couple of years, I will start showing him REAL Music, from Classical to Prog Rock to Electronica and so on, so he will have enough criteria to decide what is good (because of technique) and what does he like. So I guess I have the responsibility of teaching and educating him musically.

 

About the lack of interest in live playing, I have something to say here:

 

If the band has a very high level of virtuosism BUT they are only focused in playing, not in getting the crowd's attention, they are not gonna make it if they are not playing for people deeply involved into their music.

 

So we also have the responsibility of touching people's hearts with our art and getting them interested with what we do while playing live.

 

Music is an art. Moving the masses and having what it takes to control a crowd is part of it. Playing good is enough if you play only for musicians which can appreciate your technique and effort. The rest of the world is expecting you to do something extra to attract them.

 

Attitude, if not everything, is a big part of the music business.

GusTraX

Músico, Productor, Ingeniero, Tecnólogo

Senior Product Manager, América Latina y Caribe - PreSonus

at Fender Musical Instruments Company

 

Instagram: guslozada

Facebook: Lozada - Música y Tecnología

 

www.guslozada.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BK,

Sounds like you know Dallas really well.

 

Ken/Eleven Shadows,

I know the places you're talking about. I'm even familiar with some of the EMO-core bands you're talking about. We have our local equivalents of those bands, and yes, their shows aren't small and there's a good vibe but they are the exception. I don't think Live to Experience and their ilk are going to connect with a majority of young people. You're talking about a fringe element that can only hope to influence music (a noble pursuit, I might add).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a related thing that really gets me out of joint is people who think spinning records is equivalent to making music. in some towns (including mine, Boston) DJs can get a following like they're real musicians. funny bit by a local music writer proving my point by getting a moniker, shtick and promoting himself as a real upstart DJ, getting a rep, and then blowing the cover in an article.

 

Boy George is now a DJ. If that don't put the lie to the whole thing, nothing does.

 

 

This message has been edited by KidCharlemagne on 05-11-2001 at 02:51 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...