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Overshooting when sliding. Please help!


stenner

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Hello folks,

 

I was wondering if any of you had any advice that would help me stop over shooting the fret I want to slide to. For example, the bass line from The Red Hot Chili Peppers Give It Away requires you to rapidly slide the full length of the fret board on the d string to the 14th fret. 9 times out of 10, Ill over shoot to the 15th fret. Now and again Ill undershoot and once in a blue moon Ill hit the 14th.

 

I was hoping that maybe theres something I can practice or a technique that will help me.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Honestly, keep on practicing that song until you get it right.

 

It is a cool song, steiner. It is fast and fun to play.

 

Play the song, but play it slower, at which point you are comfortable playing it. Make sure you keep in (relative) time (count, or use a metronome). Push yourself to a BPM that is not comfortable. Practice until you get it right. Repeat until you get it to the real speed of teh song.

 

It might take a while, but if it was easy, everyone would be a rockstar.

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Do it over and over and over again! But make sure you listen and don't just think about the physical aspects.

 

You'll start to get a feel for the relationship between the change in pitch and when you need to stop sliding, so it becomes more than merely 'muscle memory' and your movement becomes linked to what you're hearing. Then when you have to do similar long slides in future you should land on the note you're aiming for.

 

Alex

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Put a few drops of super glue on the ends of your fingers before you do the slide. ;)

 

And lay off the Finger Ease...

Tenstrum

 

"Paranoid? Probably. But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face."

Harry Dresden, Storm Front

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What I do sometimes is try to go directly to a note with my eyes closed. Example: play an A (1st string, (G), 2nd fret). Then try to go directly to the A (1st string (G) and on the 14th fret). No sliding, just directly to the next octave. After a while, you can hit it almost everytime. Repeat this excercise on other strings and frets. Overtime you will be surprised how accurate you can be. Your hand will will memorize the distance and also the neck thickness and width associated with that note. It's just a fun excercise that can't hurt your bass playing ability.

Rocky

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb, voting on what to eat for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin

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I had a teacher (a quite famous player in his own right)who taught me a very valuable lesson about playing "glisses" (this was in reference to sliding on fretless, but perfectly applicable to fretted as well). He made the analogy to sliding into a base in baseball. If you time/judge your slide so that you end up with your feet at the bag, you will either go to far, or not far enough. Oddly if you imagine sliding "thru" the bag (or in our case, the note), you will actually end up at your preferred destination.

 

My guess here is that you are overshooting the fret becasue you are forcing your finger momentum to reach up to the destination. I bet if you aim for the 15th fret (tho', to be fair, one should not "aim"...the actual technique is much more Jedi: the slide has been completed in one's mind before one's hands even make the move...) you will be able to hit the 14th fine. If you aim beyond the destination, it is easy to slow down, drag and stop....not easy to backtrack once the note has been passed.

 

Practice making glisses (slides) very smoothly, slowly at first and from close intervals. Try doing slow, even and smooth slides from the 5th to 7th fret. Once this is comfortable move on up to 5th to 9th....5th to 11th etc.

 

Also practice sliding to opposite direction. Smooth slides down in pitch are difficult as one's hands tend to want to fly off and down the string.

 

Work with a metronome to practice keeping slides (and the usual vibrato which accompanies them) in tempo. A long slide up the neck should be made within the tempo of a tune.

 

Try plucking a note on the G string and sliding it up two frets, then back down, then up thrtee frets and back down without attacking the string again.

 

Practice rollinig your fingertip into a note both as you begin an slide and as you end it.

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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Originally posted by Tenstrum:

Put a few drops of super glue on the ends of your fingers before you do the slide.

Let it dry first! :D

 

Also, get some flat strings, much nicer. Less bleeding.

Rocky

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb, voting on what to eat for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin

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Some tips on shifting, to supplement those above:

 

1. Pivot at your elbow (i.e. move your forearm), and minimize hand/wrist stretching/moving.

2. Begin the motion before the note arrives - that is, if you begin to move your left elbow lower (toward the bridge) before the note, you have less to move in the "moment" you have for shifting.

3. Minimize shoulder motion.

4. Most importantly: Practice shifting in a motion that begins quickly and ends slowly. If you're moving 80mph and attempt to stop on a dime, you'll miss - you have to put the brakes on early. If you cover most of the distance in the first half of your motion, and then slow down at the end of the motion (the last three frets or so), you have a lot more control over where you land. A similar motion - imagine you're on an elevator and realize you're about to miss your floor. You'll reach out quickly toward the panel, but will slow down your hand so you hit the right button.

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Look at the 14th fret, and slide your finger to where you are looking. Don't try to watch your finger as it slides.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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Originally posted by jeremy c:

Practice with the lights off and listen to what you are playing.

I do this all the time. I think it helps co-ordinate the physical ('muscle memory') with our ears' perception of relative pitch.

 

And, it helps take away the 'opportunity' to peek at the fretboard.

 

You KNOW you do it - we all do it... ;)

 

Jim

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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After Give It Away is easy for you then you can move onto "The Humpty Dance"

 

All right!

Stop whatcha doin'

'cause I'm about to ruin

the image and the style that ya used to.

 

Brocko

Don't have a job you don't enjoy. If you're happy in what you're doing, you'll like yourself, you'll have inner peace. ~ Johnny Carson
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Originally posted by TimR:

Look at the 14th fret, and slide your finger to where you are looking. Don't try to watch your finger as it slides.

Spot on, TimR. It's like driving a motorcycle fast. Look where you want to go.

Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.

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Do a chromatic slide. So 1 fret then 2 frets then 3 frets etc. You can change it up by doing something like 1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 3, 4, 5, 4, 5, 6, 4, 5, 6, 5, 6, 7, 6, 7, 8, 7, 8, 9, 8, 10,11 etc. That might help you be familiar. playing every other note in a scale 12 frets up on the same string.

Jonathan

 

 

 

 

 

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Originally posted by Paul K:

Originally posted by TimR:

Look at the 14th fret, and slide your finger to where you are looking. Don't try to watch your finger as it slides.

Spot on, TimR. It's like driving a motorcycle fast. Look where you want to go.
Yep. This, and start slow and work up to speed, is the best advice so far.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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