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I am a new player and for christmas I am wondering.....


BrandonH

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What type of bass to get. I thinks its beetween these two

 

A Fender precision Bass Standard

Or a Fender Jazz bass standard.

 

Now I play all typed of music and I currently Own a Olp MM2 Bass. The amp I have is called a fender 15 watt rumble series bass amplifier.

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I had an OLP MM2... I played it for about 3 years before I upgraded to a Ernie Ball Sterling.

 

IF yours is any bit as good as mine, I'd probably wait off on buying a new bass and focus on your playing. By the time you get really good, you'll probably have enough money to buy a nice bass too (not saying that Mex Fenders are bad).

 

If you need something for bass, buy a new amp so you can play in a band.

In Skynyrd We Trust
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Welcome to the forum.

 

Deciding between a Precision or a Jazz?

 

Asking here on the forum, you'll probably get 40% saying Jazz, 40% saying Precision, and the other 20% suggesting something else.

 

There are lots of good reasons for each choice.

Many of us also have one of each.

 

However, I would say that you are more in need of a new amp than a new bass.

 

Your current bass is very playable and acceptable but your amp is only a practice amp and will not be suitable for playing in any band at all.

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The thinbg is: what kind of music do you play? i'd recomend you a jazz bass if you play jazz, funk, groove etc. A p-bass is better for punk, metal, modern music

Nadu, the intergalactic

funk-grand-master

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I prefer precision, but that's me, a lot of players here love their jazz. If there's nothing wrong with your OLP, spring for an amp instead.

 

If you're dead set on a bass, go to your local music store and play both, you'll know which one you really want, if you don't, don't get either.

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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You could also buy a new amp. The amp that you have is not so good. It wouldnt make much of a difference in your sound if you buy a new bass, instead, you should buy a new amp and you'll have a much better sound. Trust me, i had de fender rumble 15. ITS WAS NOT A GOOD AMPLIFIER compared to many other amplifiers i have tried over the years.

Nadu, the intergalactic

funk-grand-master

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Originally posted by jeremy c:

However, I would say that you are more in need of a new amp than a new bass.

 

Your current bass is very playable and acceptable but your amp is only a practice amp and will not be suitable for playing in any band at all.

+1. Improve your amplification first.
- Matt W.
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I would also go for the amp. You'll play more when you get hooked on that tone. I promise.

 

Let's take this bass thing apart:

 

Playability: The neck profile is quite different between these 2 basses. The Jazz neck is leaner, especially at the business end around the first few frets. This makes a difference to some players, including me. To me, I can play a bit faster on a Jazz neck profile, and that's why I bought my Warwick, which shares the profile. Odd, though, since I'm an upright bassist as well and they have enormous neck profiles.

 

Tone: The Jazz is a more brittle tone with lots of definition. It is a specialist in fast, articulate notes that will cut through.

 

The Precision is the tone that won the world. The fat, beefy, punchy classic Presicion tone is the most recorded single instrument on the planet. (The Fender Stratocaster also has an unmistakable tone.)

 

Cache: The Precision. It is the kind of instrument that is instantly recognizable. Walk in with one, and the music leader will think: "This guy knows what he's doing." Often recording engineers demand that a pro bassist bring one in for a session. And the Precision bass is the only brand name actually used in jazz charts. Studio composers from the 50's through the 70's would write arrangements that would say, "Trumpet 1" and "Bari Sax" but for bass, would specify "Precison Bass" instead of "electric bass."

 

But if I were in your shoes, I'd get me a nice Eden Nemesis for Christmas.

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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I don't see the need for a beginner to have two 4-string basses. If you're still learning it's a bit early to go chasing after different tones, IMO.

 

However, I'd say neither Fender is going to sound like your OLP MM2 (an Ernie Ball Music Man copy). Of the two listed, I'd say the Precision sounds least like the MM2. To really accentuate the difference put flat-wound strings on the P bass.

 

The Fender standards are probably of about the same quality as the MM2. If you're looking for something a little better, I'd suggest looking at basses that go for around $1,000 MSRP. I think the Fender American deluxes are in that range if you're absolutely stuck on Fender. (Price isn't always an indicator of quality; you still have to play it before you buy it to be sure.) But again, is it too early to need a better quality bass? Probably so, seeing as you're only just practicing by yourself at home.

 

If you were asking about a 5-string model, that might be different. I'd say go ahead and get the 5-string that felt right in your hands.

 

If you were asking about a fretless model, I might suggest you wait just a little bit, depending on your abilities at this point. They are a little more demanding to play. If you're having trouble with basic fretting (unwanted muting, buzzing, etc.), you should spend some time correcting that before trying to tackle something like a fretless.

 

Everyone else has already hit upon the reality check. You're not in a band yet or otherwise performing in public: there's no real need for you to get a second bass at this point. Really. Unless you absolutely loathe your MM2 and want to get rid of it. That's the only valid reason I can think of. But after playing my friend's MM3 (the 5-string version of what you have), I can't see why a beginner would hate an OLP bass. They seem to be better made than my first bass, a circa '78 Fender Musicmaster.

 

The other reality check is your amplifier. It may be plenty loud when you play by yourself, but that's about all it's good for. Really. My first amp was a 100W 1x15 combo. It did fine for smaller, softer ensembles, like jazz band or a rock trio (guitarist had a small combo amp, too). It didn't do so well in a later rock trio where the guitarist had a giant full-stack amp. Now I have a bigger amp and find myself in a small ensemble again; that 100W combo would probably be perfect (and easier to haul around).

 

There are a couple of manufacturers that make smaller 100-200W combos with either one 10-inch speaker (1x10) or 1x12. My old combo was as big as a 4x10 cabinet, and just about as difficult to move around. Also, smaller usually means lighter. Some of these new combos allow "tilt back" operation, so as they sit on the floor you can aim the speaker towards your ears.

 

They seem pretty versatile, too. Some guys use them along with their big rigs on stage as a monitor. You can bring the combo to band practice and leave your big rig at home. It can be your practice amp, too, as you'll probably like it better than your Rumble. And in a smaller, softer band, it should be plenty loud enough; you shouldn't need a big rig until you find yourself in an obnoxiously loud rock band.

 

And you're going to need better amplification soon, as in "now". As A Head with Wings points out, it's good to be in a band. Find some guys and gals that are at about your experience level (or above) and have a blast. It's difficult to wait until you're "ready" to join a band, because it's so hard to define what "ready" means.

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Just to be clear, bass is typically an ensemble instrument. It's not often played solo.

 

That's fine if you aspire to be the next Michael Manring; I'd say that's an admirable goal.

 

However, you'll probably find it more rewarding if you go the "normal" route first and spend some time playing in bands.

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I also think you would be better served buying a nice combo amp to play through. Playing though a 15 watt amp and playing through a 300 watt amp are very different. My style is different at loud volumes than at quite. SOme of these guys play professionally, some have played for over 50 years, take some timeto think about what they are saying.

 

I fell in love with a jazz bass in a music store a while ago. But other basses of the same model sucked. It really is jsut a thing you have to go and find out for yourself as far as I'm concerned.

 

Best of luck, Jonathan

 

 

 

 

 

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Get an amp.

 

A Head with Wings is absolutely correct: "The best way to get better at bass IS to play in a band." If you don't play with others, how will you know what to work on, besides getting a teacher?

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Brandon, welcome aboard! Enjoy the Low Stuff!

 

Really, upgrading the amp is the right way to go. I know the urge to get a new bass is great but, from a player's point of view, the amp upgrade makes the most sense (especially if there's someone who is willing to make it a Christmas present!)

 

You may find that there are a whole range of tones and sounds that your bass can produce that just aren't able to be pushed thru your practice amp. You may find that your bass is actually a pretty darn good instrument, provided it has the amp to give it 'balls'.

 

A suggestion - take your bass into a couple of local instrument stores (Sam Ash, GC, smaller mom-and-pops, if available) and see what your bass sounds like thru a number of different combinations, both combo amps and separate amp/speaker setups. There's such a wide range of amps to choose from that will 'color' your sound in one direction or another. Find "The One" that makes your bass sound the way you always wanted it to sound, and put that one on your Christmas list.

 

Then get with a band (or start one yourself), play some gigs and put away your 'gig money' towards a new bass. Get really good, get really rich and famous, and we'll say 'we knew you when...'. Seriously, though, the best way to improve your playing is by interacting with others in a band setting. You're probably a lot better player than you give yourself credit for (aren't we all!), but you only really recognize the strides you've made when you can hear yourself contributing a part to an ensemble tune.

 

Get the amp and go for it!

 

:thu:

 

peace,

Tim from Jersey

Play. Just play.
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Originally posted by A Head with Wings:

The best way to get better at bass IS to play in a band.

I'd have to concur with this. I'm a novice bassist and have made steady progress on my own, but since being invited into an informal church band I have specific songs to learn and deadlines to learn them by. In other words, improvement is no longer a goal, it's a commitment. Working with other musicians helps, too, and as a bonus, the church has its own amp so I can use that while I continue to save for a good one. If you need a new amp to join a band, I definitely suggest getting the amp before a new bass.
As an illustrator, I might hope my work could someday touch someone's heart, but a musician has the potentital to touch a person's very soul.
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