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Radius Gauge. Help please


DavidMPires

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Ok so this weekend I am going to perform for the first time some small adjustments on my Ibanez Soundgear (see other tread)

 

Please explain me I want to adjust the radius gauge of my bass do I need special tools?

 

Or just eyeball should do?

 

www.myspace.com/davidbassportugal

 

"And then the magical unicorn will come prancing down the rainbow and we'll all join hands for a rousing chorus of Kumbaya." - by davio

 

 

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I think you are asking if you need a special gauge to set up the bridge so that the strings are the same height from the fret board.

 

If you want to be super accurate you can just use a piece of stiff card, cutting it using the end of your fret board as a template.

 

If you raise and lower the height of each string by much, you will need to change its length to keep the intonation correct. Which will in turn then change its height. I would just do it by eye and what feels right to you, or you my be there all weekend ;)

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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By radius guage, I assume you are talking about making the strings and saddles match the fretboard radius.

 

Two ways to do this:

1: Use a ruler with measurements marked in small units (mm or 64ths) and set each string so it's roughly the same distance above the last fret. I generally measure to the bottom of the string and a bit for the differences in diameter, then judge the results by feel.

 

2: Buy, print, or make a radius guage to use as a reference. There are some available online in .pdf and other formats... kinman.com for example.

- Matt W.
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To get a little techinical, I believe the big string needs more clearance from the frets than the little string. This is because it has more "movement" when plucked. I agree that the contour of the strings should be arched like the fret board I don't think every strings clearance should be the same. Is that too confusing? I encourage you to go ahead with your plan. Learning about these things is important and you need to know how to do them.

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb, voting on what to eat for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin

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Its weird when that happens, isn't it Mat. I think I must have posted my repy just as you started to read, that would explain the 6 mins difference.

There were 3 simultaneous answers the same on one of thannys qu's the other day!

 

What is the record?

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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If there is a record, it could be amusing to re-read the thread.

 

I am frequently posting from work. When the phone rings I have to put the post on hold. Sometimes I write a lot of commentary and have to pare it down to what is relevant... that can take awhile!

- Matt W.
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Personally, I've never used a "radius gauge", but it seems like a time-saver.

 

Since the neck itself has a "radius" (curve/arc), it is adequate for most folks to measure the neck-to-string gap with a good ruler (in 64ths of an inch). On my basses, this is always been done by putting a capo on the first fret, and "fretting" the highest fret. As I recall, the measurement is taken at the 8th fret.

 

In general, the lower strings will need a bit more distance from the fretboard, since they move more when they are plucked.

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Like Rocky, I've looked at the string movement as well as the radius. If you want the strings to be fairly consistent in their height from the fretboard and not suffer too much FretWhack, you end up with an asynchronous curve of the strings. I set mine by feel, not by measurement.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by Tom Capasso:

Like Rocky, I've looked at the string movement as well as the radius. If you want the strings to be fairly consistent in their height from the fretboard and not suffer too much FretWhack, you end up with an asynchronous curve of the strings. I set mine by feel, not by measurement.

 

Tom

I agree. I'm not sure what the correct term would be here though. Not asynchronous or asymmetrical, probably more eccentric. You can still use the template to get the strings close to having the same curve, but be aware of what Tom says.

 

Personally I set each string in turn depending on fret buzz, and they seem to magically work out in the right ball park. I think the radius tool might be more used by guitarists as their strings are thinner.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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I like to keep things simple, I lower each string until it buzzes then raise it to where it stops. Then I am done..... Unless I want to experiment, like I always do. Then I move it up and down until I get past my curiousity. Then I go back to the beginning.

:freak:

Rocko aka Rocky

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb, voting on what to eat for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin

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I'm with the Rock here - and Tom. I think they may be saying the same thing.

Lower until a good whack gives a buzz - raise, whack, raise, like, lower, whack, cuss, raise again, intonate, done.

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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