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OT: Rhyming slang for Bass


way2fat

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I found Davo-London's info about cockney rhyming slang very interesting. I believe he said that it was only happening in London. Why don't we take it to the world's Bass players?

 

The word Fender could have many meanings in such a patois:

 

A kid might tell their sibling "You're such a fender." (Fender Jazz = spaz)

 

A reporter covering a political event might report that "the crowd heaped fender on Congressman X's plan" (Fender Precision = derision)

 

A musician might decide to play fenderless at some gigs (Fender Squier = wire)

 

I might decide to drink less beer because my fender is getting fenderer (Tele, Strat)

 

Anybody got some?

 

 

www.ethertonswitch.com

 

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Steady ...

 

How about:

 

 

"Golly, that chap's a triffle mike"

ie mike = Mike Lull = dull

 

"Hey man, where's my Ken?"

ie Ken = Ken Smith = spliff

 

"I say, your rig rattles my phil!"

ie phil = Phil Jones = bones

 

How did I get into this!

 

Davo

"We will make you bob your head whether you want to or not". - David Sisk
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Originally posted by Davo-London:

Steady ...

 

How about:

 

 

"Golly, that chap's a triffle mike"

ie mike = Mike Lull = dull

 

"Hey man, where's my Ken?"

ie Ken = Ken Smith = spliff

 

"I say, your rig rattles my phil!"

ie phil = Phil Jones = bones

 

How did I get into this!

 

Davo

You shouldn't have encouraged me. BTW, spliff is understood here, I believe that lemon was being facetious.

 

 

www.ethertonswitch.com

 

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So those who insult us for improper use of the Queen's English are now destroying it themselves?

 

This is why I drink! Or used to...

 

Say "Yes" when you mean "yes" and "no" when you mean "no". All else is from the evil one...

"Am I enough of a freak to be worth paying to see?"- Separated Out (Marillion)

NEW band Old band

 

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Originally posted by Phil W:

The word 'spliff' originated in the Caribbean (surprise, surprise) ;) No-one knows the origin but it's a cool sounding word. I'm sure I've heard the word used in the US.

But it does rhyme with reef or kif. More than coincidence? We'll let you decide.

 

 

www.ethertonswitch.com

 

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Originally posted by way2fat:

Originally posted by Phil W:

The word 'spliff' originated in the Caribbean (surprise, surprise) ;) No-one knows the origin but it's a cool sounding word. I'm sure I've heard the word used in the US.

But it does rhyme with reef or kif. More than coincidence? We'll let you decide.
I've always heard it rhyming with reef. Not that it ever comes up in conversation. ;)

 

Ed

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Originally posted by Bruiser:

Originally posted by way2fat:

Originally posted by Phil W:

The word 'spliff' originated in the Caribbean (surprise, surprise) ;) No-one knows the origin but it's a cool sounding word. I'm sure I've heard the word used in the US.

But it does rhyme with reef or kif. More than coincidence? We'll let you decide.
I've always heard it rhyming with reef. Not that it ever comes up in conversation. ;)

 

Ed

Nope - to rhyme with cliff. Used to come up in conversation. :freak:
The bass player's job is to make the drummer sound good - Jack Bruce
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