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Gallien-Krueger + Ampeg 810.


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BGO-

 

I own a Cavin R600, a GK 1000rb, an Ampeg 8-10, a 4-10, a 2-10 and a 1-15 cab. I use them in different combinations at church and for jazz and blues gigs in small to medium clubs. But, notice which rig I use when I need the full on rock show: http://myspace-658.vo.llnwd.net/00304/85/65/304165658_l.jpg

 

GK 1000rb & Ampeg SVT810. I've used the R600 with the SVT810 and it sounds aight but with the GK it can actually make you nauseous. Use the right tool for the job and you'll always get it done right.

pray peace, all love and unity

 

"There are only two kinds of music; good and bad."

~Duke Ellington~

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haha, yeah, i dunno if that meter was correct, it was set kinda like this:

 

"Weighting: C"

"Level: 100-130db"

"Fast Response"

 

The issue of the band being loud is probably due to a guitarist who likes to be loud (though i try to get on him for that), who uses two cabs (One with a Marshall JCM 900, which is quiet a loud vintage tube amp, btw, lol), and a drummer with a louder than average drumset (DW's with some custom stuff i believe).

 

i just got back from guitar center, and although i left my dB meter at home my head with an Ampeg 810 sounded much much much louder than my rig.

 

one of the other problems that i had was that my rig was just barely handling the wattage (The cones were moving WAYYY too much than they should have), and the Ampeg 810 handled the 1000W with ease.

 

I was in a soundcontrolled room by myself with my own bass, cables, and head, standing about 5-10 feet away so i was as accurate as i could be.

 

The 810 sounded amazing due to it's high wattage handling and nice deep response. I tried the Ampeg 610 as well, but even with the tweeter off, it seemed much tighter than the warm and low 810.

 

i wear hearing protection (ear plugs that are used for machines such as jack hammers), but i can't remember exactly the dB reduction rating. The scary thing is that our guitarist doesn't and has never worn any hearing protection.

 

tiss tiss, poor guy.

 

so bottom line:

 

-I need to work on my guitarist getting to a decent level

-keep wearing ear plugs

-buy Ampeg 810

-Sell Carvin 410 and Behringer 115 (Do you think i could get around 300 for both in good condition?)

 

 

;)

 

Like i said, thanks again for the advice and comments.

 

:D:thu:

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Honestly, now, I've said it before and I'll say it again -- admittedly a generalization, but still relevant here:

 

400W into most 4x10 cabs, Carvin included, should create enough volume for a really wide range of indoor venues.

 

If you're not loud enough for one guitarist and one drummer with the rig you're using now, I think the fundamental problem does not lie with the rig.

 

Peace.

--s-uu

 

PS: That said, definitely double dose on the 8x10, and consider moving from a head to a preamp and power amp set-up. Potentially a power amp that supplies > 1500W into 4 ohms.

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

haha, yeah, i dunno if that meter was correct, it was set kinda like this:

 

"Weighting: C"

"Level: 100-130db"

"Fast Response"

That looks correct to me.

 

Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

The issue of the band being loud is probably due to a guitarist who likes to be loud (though i try to get on him for that), who uses two cabs (One with a Marshall JCM 900, which is quiet a loud vintage tube amp, btw, lol), and a drummer with a louder than average drumset (DW's with some custom stuff i believe).

Neanderthals... Unplug the guitarist's lower cab. And give the drummer some lighter sticks. Who's singing? They're the one that can really justify the need to play quieter, so they sound half decent and can be loud enough without feedback.

 

Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

...my head with an Ampeg 810 sounded much much much louder than my rig.

Not surprised.

 

Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

one of the other problems that i had was that my rig was just barely handling the wattage (The cones were moving WAYYY too much than they should have), and the Ampeg 810 handled the 1000W with ease.

The amount of bass that a cab puts out is down to the total area of the speakers, multiplied by how far they move. If your current cabs' speakers are moving WAYYY too much then that's because you're putting too much bottom into them. Reduce your bass boost, particularly at sub 50Hz frequencies. Then miraculously the Carvin 4x10" will handle all your head's power without complaining. The Ampeg is a sealed cab so the internal air pressure stops the speakers moving too far, so however much your crank up the bass boost on your head, it ignores that and continues to put out a relatively midrangey sound without any deep lows.

 

Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

The 810 sounded amazing due to it's high wattage handling and nice deep response... ...I tried the Ampeg 610 as well, but even with the tweeter off, it seemed much tighter than the warm and low 810.

I worry about your ears - seems they're already on their way out. The Ampeg 810 just doesn't go that low. And being a sealed cab it sounds tighter than the ported and bassier 610.

 

Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

-I need to work on my guitarist getting to a decent level

-keep wearing ear plugs

-buy Ampeg 810

-Sell Carvin 410 and Behringer 115 (Do you think i could get around 300 for both in good condition?)

Seems the best route to take.

 

Alex

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I think we must all admit in most "musical" situations the Ampeg 8-10 is as much about visual impact as it is about volume and tonal quality. I could get away with a combo amp going direct to the house and rely on the monitor mix but, who can see that from vendor row at an outdoor festival?

pray peace, all love and unity

 

"There are only two kinds of music; good and bad."

~Duke Ellington~

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http://benloy.com/images/Carvin.JPG

 

Daisy chain both cabinets together. Plug one of the cabinets into into whichever speaker connection on the back allows you to bridge the output.

 

Add some bass or treble using the "Low" or "High" knobs to taste. Don't touch any of the other controls.

 

If it isn't butt-looseningly loud, then buy an Ampeg 8x10.

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BGO:

 

I was going to suggest that you try your Carvin head with the Ampeg 810 cab, but looks like you already have. Unless you're using an extreme smiley face EQ, that should be plenty loud. The Carvin RL-410T's start rolling off lows at about 60Hz, so you need two of them to get good lows out (they do have pretty good sensitivity though). The Behringer 15 probably has a pretty low sensitivity (just my guess, don't know for sure), so it's probably putting out less low frequency SPL than the Carvin is.

 

Since BGO really likes lows, maybe he should consider an Acme LowB4? If he uses a smiley face EQ, he might find that he doesn't need to with the Acme's...just a thought. The Carvin ought to drive one of those plenty well I'd think.

 

But, if you like how the Ampeg 810 sounds with your head, by all means sell your other stuff and get it!

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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That looks correct to me.

 

What does "Weighted: C" mean, becuase there is a "Weighted: A" setting on it as well (It's a radioshack brand btw)

 

Neanderthals... Unplug the guitarist's lower cab. And give the drummer some lighter sticks. Who's singing? They're the one that can really justify the need to play quieter, so they sound half decent and can be loud enough without feedback.

Haha, actually, he uses a loop station and runs all the loops through the second cab. It's the guitarist and Myself that do the singing. next practice i will mos def talk to them about turning it down. i dunno about talking to my drummer about lighter sticks though, he's very picky about his gear, just as i am super picky about the kind of picks i use.

 

The amount of bass that a cab puts out is down to the total area of the speakers, multiplied by how far they move. If your current cabs' speakers are moving WAYYY too much then that's because you're putting too much bottom into them. Reduce your bass boost, particularly at sub 50Hz frequencies. Then miraculously the Carvin 4x10" will handle all your head's power without complaining. The Ampeg is a sealed cab so the internal air pressure stops the speakers moving too far, so however much your crank up the bass boost on your head, it ignores that and continues to put out a relatively midrangey sound without any deep lows.

Really? That's odd.

 

I set them right next to each other and the 610 seemed higher. I thought the same would happen, becuase of the sealed port design of the 810, but i didn't get a huge load of midrange, which is good, because that's not exactly what i'm into. I could definitly feel the increased mids, which is something that i could fix with my eq correct? (i haven't used sealed cabs before), however, the 610 seemed to be higher all around. I might need to go back and try them again and change my EQ while there (i'll be going back soon anywho). The problem i think i might run into, is how would i make up the bass response if i turned down the bass on my EQ. more gain maybe? :confused:

 

I worry about your ears - seems they're already on their way out. The Ampeg 810 just doesn't go that low. And being a sealed cab it sounds tighter than the ported and bassier 610.
Well, if it makes any difference, i've been practicing in quaters such as these with this volume level for less than six months, three times a week about, for around an 60-90 minutes per practice.

 

 

Seems the best route to take.

haha, yes it does, after i work on my eq though.

 

Here is a pretty accurate read out of my head:

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v426/Bass_god_offspring/exa.jpg

 

I know some of it might seem wierd and contradictory, but for some reason, those are pretty good tone settings for my rig.

 

:wave:

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Yes, much of that does seem weird and contradictory.

 

Try to use only one of your three EQ sections. I'll support Mr. Loy's suggested settings as a trial point for you. You will note that he has suggested not using the pre-shape filters and not using the graphic EQ.

 

If you are having trouble being heard in a rock setting, some boost at about 250 Hz (or 200 Hz as Mr. Loy has suggested) ought to help you to be heard. I feel like you've read this before.

 

Approx. what is the mid freq you're boosting in the semi-parametric EQ section? "Straight up" is meaningless without knowing the freq range of that control.

 

Turn off the x-over if it's not being used. Also, if it were being used, you would want to set it lower than 800 Hz.

 

Contradictions:

Mid shift is on, cutting the mids.

Mid freq in the semi-parametric is boosted.

Mid freqs in the graphic EQ are cut.

 

Low boost is on in the preshape section.

Lows are cut in the next EQ section.

Lows are boosted in the graphic EQ.

 

Some people call this shooting yourself in the foot.

 

Peace.

--SW

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Just a thought here...it took me a long time to realize that what sounds good to me when I'm playing my bass only is totally different that what sounds good in the whole mix. If you ever do any recording and try to get a good mix where the bass can be heard and is articulate, but still has plenty of lows, you'll understand...that's what sealed it for me. I would suggest that you try almost the opposite of your smiley face curve (cut the low lows and boost some of the lower mids) and listen closely to how that sounds when you're playing with the other instruments. You can still feel stuff up to around 150 Hz or even higher...but at that frequency it's not a muddy indistinct "feel", it's a more defined "feel" where you can hear and feel it. Also, some boost somewhere in the 800 Hz region or so might really bring out some clarity and articulation.

 

That said, if this smiley face EQ is what you really like, you might want to just consider adding a seperate power amp. IIRC, the Carvin can be bridged for 1000 watts into 8 ohms, right? You could then use the preamp output to drive a seperate power amp and cab. Just a thought. (I've seen some awefully good comments about the Behringer EP1500 and EP2500, and they are dirt cheap used. There's plenty of others to choose from too.) Realize though that when you record, the smiley face simply won't work in the final mix.

 

And, that said, I think your cabs are still your weakest link, your EQ preferences considered or not.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Aren't you running pedals into this as well?

 

I agree with BenLoy... set it flat. Just to see if you can get volume that way. Then start tweaking EQ, but remember, a little goes a long way.

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Just buy the SVT810 if it sounds good. Honestly, all the advice you are receiving regarding learning how to use your amplifier is great, but if the SVT810 sounds good and your cabinets don't sound good, why bother going through the motions when you could just buy the SVT810 and be done with it and play instead of tweaking knobs.
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Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

haha, yes it does, after i work on my eq though.

Right, so you've got three EQ sections, running one after another doing this:

 

+8dB @ 90 Hz, -10 dB @ 500 Hz

 

-1dB @ 100Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz

 

+7dB @ 50Hz, +6dB @80Hz, +4dB @ 125Hz, -2dB @ 250Hz, -0.5dB@500Hz, -2dB @ 800Hz, +5dB @ 1300Hz, +5dB @ 2600Hz, +4dB @ 5000Hz

 

Now remember that these frequencies represent either the start of the slope for shelving filter or the centre frequency for a peaking filter. So boost in similar areas will add up. If we break this down into the main areas and then work out the cut or boost in each area.

 

Sub Bass (below 60Hz) - This is so low that your cabinets barely produce any sound down here. Any EQ boost will just be wasted power.

Bass (60-180Hz) - This area contains huge energy. Any boost will hugely increase the amounts of lows whilst sucking up equally huge amounts of power and headroom.

Low Mids (180-350Hz) - This is what makes you sound thick and fat and like a bass. Too much equals mud, too little equals not being heard.

Mids (350-650Hz) - This is what gives your notes pitch. Really gets you heard. Has a lot of bass character too.

High Mids (650-1000Hz) - This is also a great area for getting heard but not so nice sounding as mid-mids. Another dose of bass personality is here.

Treble (1000Hz+; this subdivides but we're playing bass so there's not much power up there) - This is your bite and attack etc.

 

So, Sub Bass is affected by +7dB @ 50Hz, -1dB @ 100 Hz and +8dB @ 90Hz (the latter two are shelving filters so they affect everything below their frequency). That's a total of 14dB sub-bass boost. Your cabs barely put out down there, yet you're asking for the volume to be more than doubled in this region, which equates to asking for 20 times as much power. That's like turning your Carvin from a 1000W head into a measly 50W head. And that's why your cones are leaping all over the place.

 

Bass is affected by +8dB @ 90 Hz, -1dB @ 100Hz, +6dB @80Hz and +4dB @ 125Hz. The peaking graphic EQ shouldn't overlap too much so you can't just total up those numbers. But the total amount of EQ is roughly 14dB bass boost. As least you can hear that coming out of your cabs. But it's making your cones leap like crazy and is again sucking up power because you're asking for every 100W of bass energy to be boosted to over 2000W. Unfortunately you simply don't have enough power, and even if you did the cabs wouldn't be able to take it down here.

 

Low Mids are affected by -10 dB @ 500 Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz and -2dB @ 250Hz. Looks like that's coming out at about 4dB low mid cut. So the essence of bass is being sucked out there and you're having to try and add fat lower down - which eats power and sounds crap.

 

Mids are affected by -10 dB @ 500 Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz and -0.5dB@500Hz. So simply you're getting 7.5dB mid cut. That's all your note definition and anything else that makes you sound like a bass guitar as opposed to wallowing boomy thing, gone! You sure you haven't been hanging out with Fieldy?!!

 

High Mids are affected by -10 dB @ 500 Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz and -2dB @ 800Hz. So that's about 5dB high mid cut. Any hope you had of cutting through and sounding like a bass is now gone...

 

Treble is affected by -2dB @ 800Hz, +5dB @ 1300Hz, +5dB @ 2600Hz and +4dB @ 5000Hz. So that's about 4dB treble boost. So at least you can hear your pick attack and any rattling and squeaking.

 

Now obviously you're doing this EQ for a reason. But I think you need to be weaned off it, to a degree. It sounds like this EQ was done to make your bass sound good on its own, not good in the mix. For starters, can you pull the lowest graphic EQ band right to the bottom, to make up for the boost from the lows preset, which is just killing your speakers and not being heard in the sub-bass. And in all the other regions can you try halving the amount of boost or cut. So aim to get these total EQ settings of:

 

3dB sub-bass cut

7dB bass boost

2dB low mid cut

4dB mid cut

2dB high mid cut

2dB treble boost

 

Try it - you might like it. And your rig should go almost 10dB louder without clipping - that's twice as loud!

 

Alex

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Just buy the SVT810 if it sounds good. Honestly, all the advice you are receiving regarding learning how to use your amplifier is great, but if the SVT810 sounds good and your cabinets don't sound good, why bother going through the motions when you could just buy the SVT810 and be done with it and play instead of tweaking knobs.
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Right, so you've got three EQ sections, running one after another doing this:

 

+8dB @ 90 Hz, -10 dB @ 500 Hz

 

-1dB @ 100Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz

 

+7dB @ 50Hz, +6dB @80Hz, +4dB @ 125Hz, -2dB @ 250Hz, -0.5dB@500Hz, -2dB @ 800Hz, +5dB @ 1300Hz, +5dB @ 2600Hz, +4dB @ 5000Hz

 

Now remember that these frequencies represent either the start of the slope for shelving filter or the centre frequency for a peaking filter. So boost in similar areas will add up. If we break this down into the main areas and then work out the cut or boost in each area.

 

Sub Bass (below 60Hz) - This is so low that your cabinets barely produce any sound down here. Any EQ boost will just be wasted power.

Bass (60-180Hz) - This area contains huge energy. Any boost will hugely increase the amounts of lows whilst sucking up equally huge amounts of power and headroom.

Low Mids (180-350Hz) - This is what makes you sound thick and fat and like a bass. Too much equals mud, too little equals not being heard.

Mids (350-650Hz) - This is what gives your notes pitch. Really gets you heard. Has a lot of bass character too.

High Mids (650-1000Hz) - This is also a great area for getting heard but not so nice sounding as mid-mids. Another dose of bass personality is here.

Treble (1000Hz+; this subdivides but we're playing bass so there's not much power up there) - This is your bite and attack etc.

 

So, Sub Bass is affected by +7dB @ 50Hz, -1dB @ 100 Hz and +8dB @ 90Hz (the latter two are shelving filters so they affect everything below their frequency). That's a total of 14dB sub-bass boost. Your cabs barely put out down there, yet you're asking for the volume to be more than doubled in this region, which equates to asking for 20 times as much power. That's like turning your Carvin from a 1000W head into a measly 50W head. And that's why your cones are leaping all over the place.

 

Bass is affected by +8dB @ 90 Hz, -1dB @ 100Hz, +6dB @80Hz and +4dB @ 125Hz. The peaking graphic EQ shouldn't overlap too much so you can't just total up those numbers. But the total amount of EQ is roughly 14dB bass boost. As least you can hear that coming out of your cabs. But it's making your cones leap like crazy and is again sucking up power because you're asking for every 100W of bass energy to be boosted to over 2000W. Unfortunately you simply don't have enough power, and even if you did the cabs wouldn't be able to take it down here.

 

Low Mids are affected by -10 dB @ 500 Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz and -2dB @ 250Hz. Looks like that's coming out at about 4dB low mid cut. So the essence of bass is being sucked out there and you're having to try and add fat lower down - which eats power and sounds crap.

 

Mids are affected by -10 dB @ 500 Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz and -0.5dB@500Hz. So simply you're getting 7.5dB mid cut. That's all your note definition and anything else that makes you sound like a bass guitar as opposed to wallowing boomy thing, gone! You sure you haven't been hanging out with Fieldy?!!

 

High Mids are affected by -10 dB @ 500 Hz, +2dB @ 500Hz and -2dB @ 800Hz. So that's about 5dB high mid cut. Any hope you had of cutting through and sounding like a bass is now gone...

 

Treble is affected by -2dB @ 800Hz, +5dB @ 1300Hz, +5dB @ 2600Hz and +4dB @ 5000Hz. So that's about 4dB treble boost. So at least you can hear your pick attack and any rattling and squeaking.

 

Now obviously you're doing this EQ for a reason. But I think you need to be weaned off it, to a degree. It sounds like this EQ was done to make your bass sound good on its own, not good in the mix. For starters, can you pull the lowest graphic EQ band right to the bottom, to make up for the boost from the lows preset, which is just killing your speakers and not being heard in the sub-bass. And in all the other regions can you try halving the amount of boost or cut. So aim to get these total EQ settings of:

 

3dB sub-bass cut

7dB bass boost

2dB low mid cut

4dB mid cut

2dB high mid cut

2dB treble boost

 

Try it - you might like it. And your rig should go almost 10dB louder without clipping - that's twice as loud!

 

Alex

I Grovel at thou feet.

 

 

:love:

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

I Grovel at thou feet.

 

:love:

First of all, it would be "thine" feet. ;)

 

Second, man, it's just math w/ a smidge of science thrown in for good measure. What kind of math? Addition and subtraction of positive and negative numbers. While you should be appropriately grateful to Claberonious Phunk :thu: , you should also recognize that you could've figured some of this out for yourself! :eek: (Where again was that NCLB thread re: basic skills in math and reading and music education?)

 

Third, just get the 8x10 and stop fussing about all of this.

 

Peace.

--Doctor Luv

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I thought it would be "thy" feet.

 

While I'm in "King James" mode, let me strangle Getz with my halo ;)

 

Work carefully to understand what Loy and Claber are telling you. Take time, print it out, play with the settings, and try to understand HOW these things work. If you don't, you'll eventually have similar problems with any rig.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Sub Bass (below 60Hz) - This is so low that your cabinets barely produce any sound down here. Any EQ boost will just be wasted power.

Bass (60-180Hz) - This area contains huge energy. Any boost will hugely increase the amounts of lows whilst sucking up equally huge amounts of power and headroom.

Low Mids (180-350Hz) - This is what makes you sound thick and fat and like a bass. Too much equals mud, too little equals not being heard.

Mids (350-650Hz) - This is what gives your notes pitch. Really gets you heard. Has a lot of bass character too.

High Mids (650-1000Hz) - This is also a great area for getting heard but not so nice sounding as mid-mids. Another dose of bass personality is here.

Treble (1000Hz+; this subdivides but we're playing bass so there's not much power up there) - This is your bite and attack etc.

Man, this is such a good description, I find myself wanting to post this section in a seperate thread!

 

I do think some of this depends somewhat on the bass though (and the bassist, and the strings, and...you get the idea). For instance, putting a little boost at about 800 Hz when using my MM SR5 really makes what appears to be low frequency growl appear. However, in general, I agree with Alex's listing above...I've never heard it all put that succinctly before.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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So i worked on my settings at practice today.

 

 

lemme just say.

 

WOW.

 

the main reason why i didnt mess with them is becuase i was in a "comfort zone" and i didn't want to get out of it.

 

However, after being compaired to Fieldy of Korn.......I decided i could mess around with them.

 

So i tweaked, turned off the graphic (2nd) EQ, and instead boosted the lows with a slight curve so i can turn it on during a (crazy/mind blowing) solo so you can really feel it while not clipping too much.

 

i initially set all my settings to zero, i ended up using the pre eq (as much as i tried not to) boosted the lows and mids to get my general tone, then boosted my mids, lows, and Highs to about "+1 , +1.5, and 1.7 on my basic EQ. i boosted the gain and master up a nice amount to make up for the graphic EQ, and it sounds pretty darn good. it's not exactly perfect, but pretty satisfying for one practice.

 

 

So once again THANK YOU!

 

 

i still would like to invest in a 610 or 810 however just so i could inprove the sound quality.

 

 

P.S. My guitarist said this in response to his volume level, "Yeah, but what they don't know is that guitar tubes sound better the louder your push them." (He then proved that statement, haha)

 

 

:wave::D:wave:

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

 

P.S. My guitarist said this in response to his volume level, "Yeah, but what they don't know is that guitar tubes sound better the louder your push them." (He then proved that statement, haha)

I'm guessing he showed you the results to his latest ear exam and then handed you his hearing aids.............what? No :confused:
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Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

However, after being compaired to Fieldy of Korn.......I decided i could mess around with them.

You could be compared to a lot worse.

Tenstrum

 

"Paranoid? Probably. But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face."

Harry Dresden, Storm Front

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My guitarist said this in response to his volume level, "Yeah, but what they don't know is that guitar tubes sound better the louder your push them." (He then proved that statement, haha)
This is actually only really true with older-style tube amps. And... there are ways to get the same amount of "tube pushing" from an amp at lower volumes: THD HotPlate and Dr. Z Air Brake.

 

Anyway... Considering how loud it seems you guys are already playing, it seems that your new EQ techniques are working well for your purposes.

 

And, BTW, I LOVE playing loud... feels great! But I never rehearse without my earplugs. Seriously... I'd look into a pair of those cheapo foam plugs for rehearsals... you will feel better afterwards, and you won't be deaf before you're 30.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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Originally posted by Bass_god_offspring:

P.S. My guitarist said this in response to his volume level, "Yeah, but what they don't know is that guitar tubes sound better the louder your push them."

And this is why there are 18watt class A tube amps on the market.
- Matt W.
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Alex, it's time to donate some sperm and have it frozen for posterity. Such brillance should not be wasted on us mere contemporaries.

:D

BGO: you know you want it. we can smell the pheromones from here.

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This is actually only really true with older-style tube amps. And... there are ways to get the same amount of "tube pushing" from an amp at lower volumes: THD HotPlate and Dr. Z Air Brake.
actually, his is a vintage JCM 900.

 

Very old style Marshall head, and very nice sounding as well.

 

i do use earplugs when we practice, as does our drummer, however, our guitarist don't like to, i forget why though.

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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Originally posted by Matt W:

And this is why there are 18watt class A tube amps on the market.

And also why those little amps are ridiculously expensive!

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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