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New Amp


carpedebass

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OK, I just purchased a new head for what will be my main rig. Please tell me I did OK...

It's a Hartke 7000 lightly used, but I'm planning on sending the signal through it into 2 4X10s of some sort. I play ONLY 5 and 6 string basses, so I'll need something that will handle a low B with authority. Should I look at biamping into a 1x15 as well, or can anyone recommend a decent (not overly expensive) 4x10 that will deal with the low B??

 

:cool:

Love God...Love People!

 

 

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Reasonably priced 4x10 that will handle a low B:

 

Peavey 410 TVX. I was tuned down to low A and never had a problem.

 

Congrats on the new head, tell us how you like it.

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Congrats...that's a decent sounding amp.

 

There's a lot of 410's that will handle a low-B without farting-out. Some don't reproduce a huge amount of the 31Hz fundamental, but it's not like you hear nothing when you play a low B.

 

I used to have two Carvin RL-410T's that were very good, especially given the price. Lows start to roll off at about 60Hz though. They still sounded good, just had to use more EQ than I would have liked.

 

SWR Goliath ought to do the trick quite well, as should an Ampeg 410HLF (?). Everyone raves about the Acme LowB cabs (www.acmebass.com), and they are reasonably priced. They are also quite power-hungry. You *might* be able to find a Bergantino HT212 at a good price since they were discontinued (replaced by the HT322). SWR Triad will handle a 5-string fine.

 

Just a thought...you might want to consider some different size cabs rather than two 410's. Maybe a 210 and a 212, or 210 and SWR Triad. I'm thinking something like a big one and a smaller one...that way you essentially have three rigs...small (210), medium (212, 215, 410), and large (both).

 

I've never liked the idea of biamping in practice, to be honest, but that's probably because I haven't had good experiences with biamping some of the gear I've owned. I think to get the max benefit out of biamping, you have to have cabs that are really well-matched in terms of frequency response and sensitivity (and considering how the mfg's fudge these numbers, I don't know how you'd ever get an accurate read on that part of it). AND I think biamping is best done by using multiple power amps that are well-matched to the cabs' sensitivities rather than a single stereo bass head. I prefer full-range cabs run full-range, but that's merely my preference. To me, that just sounds better and louder. Your amp has built-in features for biamping, right? Try it yourself and form your own opinion...maybe you'll have better results with it than I did.

 

Regardless of this, go play everything you can find and see what sounds best to you.

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Thanks guys. You have given me mucho ideas! I really wanted to stick with the "punch" of the 10 inch speakers rather than quality reproduction of extreme lows...I just didn't want farting...I mean who wants farting anyway?

:D

Love God...Love People!

 

 

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UPDATE!

Well, the idiot decided he didn't want to sell the 7000. But I ran up on a HA4000 and really found my sound quickly through a 4x10 cab from none other than Legion. Legion...can you believe it? I know they are cheap as all get out, but they'll do until I can get some better cabs. I won't have nearly the headroom with the 4000, but I think FOH support will cover what I cannot. We play a lot of Church sized venues, so I really do not need more headroom right now...and I saved a chunk of ca$h!!

For cabs, I think I'll go with a good quality 4x10 on top of a 2x15 or something...

Love God...Love People!

 

 

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I bought a used 8 Ohm SWR Goliath III for $375. With a 1400 watt power amp (900 watts at 8 ohm) it handles the low B quite well. I can't imagine needing to add another cabinet to this set up, I'm getting very full lows and an over all balanced tone out of this one cab with more volume than I'll ever need... well, unless of course I need to compete with a couple Marshall half stacks or something else rediculously loud like that.
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From the specs I've read online, it sounds like you're better off with the 4000 than the 7000 for your application. With the Sub Bass output you're all set to add a powered sub in case you want more bottom end support for your low B string (like a JBL JRX118SP).

 

400W for church-sized venues is more than enough. Even driving a single 8 ohm cab (220W) is plenty. I have a 3500 driving a 4x10 (8 ohms, 240W) that I use at church with acoustic/electric guitars (through house PA), baby grand, and mic'd congas and vocals, and my master volume is barely cracked. (My predecessor used a 1x12 kickback combo, so I'm way overkill on this one.) I leave my 2nd 3500 and 4x10 at home.

 

Dave has some good suggestions for making a flexible system. I know I wouldn't mind having a lighter 2x10 or 1x12 cab for my church gig.

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I hear you, ric. I guess that's one thing that sold me on the 4000 was the ability to expand or minimize as situations occur. I'm definately interested in exploring the sub out. I think that will help a lot. Also, I can always look into the possibility of slaving amps to it if I should end up needing more headroom, right?

I do have a question though that the manual does not answer...If I run a 4x10 at 8ohms, and a 1x15 at 8 ohms, then I'm running a true 4 ohm setup. Anybody know if adding the powered sub will mess with that 4 ohm load since it goes through a seperate jack? I don't want to fry my amp!

Love God...Love People!

 

 

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Get an efficient (read: not cheap cheap, buy something used and no longer flavour of the month - e.g. SWR or Eden) 4x10" or 2x12". Much less painful to move than a cheaper 4x10"+1x15" stack, better sounding and louder. Alternatively Avatar's 2x12" is great value for money.

 

Then again, if you're willing to cart that much gear and need to be loud, why buy a head? Get something like a used SWR Grand Prix or BBE B-Max, a used power amp, stick them in a 3-space rack, and revel in the tone and volume. And enjoy how that much power into a single 4x10" or 2x12" will comfortably keep up with a few hundred watts into a full-stack, and be moveable on your own!

 

Alex

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OK, a little more research has answered my question...The SBass out jack goes to a seperate power amp which runs the sub. The head just sends the subharmonic signal to the seperate amp. Hmmm, my curiosity is peaked.

;)

Love God...Love People!

 

 

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Cool deal, Carpe...my first head was a Hartke 350 watt deal...they are decent heads. The sub output must be a new thing, hadn't seen that before...is there a crossover or low-pass control to set what frequencies get sent to the sub-out jack? You could add a powered sub, or a power amp and a low-freq only cab.

 

RBG...are you playing bass in church now?

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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