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changing flavors.


rumpelstiltskin.

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so i put a reverend P pickup in my P clone to replace a bartolini pickup that had been in there for several years. and i loved the tone. it worked really well with the strings on the bass and how my amp is set up. it was perfect for the music i have been playing in my new band.

 

but the process of rehearsals and then a gig deadened the strings (they're not entirely gone yet, but pretty close) and i was ready for something different.

 

for rehearsal last sunday i grabbed my cirrus BXP with DR black beauties on it. i hadn't played it since this past fall, except a little when i bought my classic 400. i didn't really feel like changing tones right before the gig, but now that the gig is past, i thought some fresher strings might be really enjoyable.

 

it was great. the guitar player was having some equipment issues during a new song we were working on, so the drummer and i just played through it several times. i was so enjoying the tone of my bass that i really enjoyed just playing, even repetitively; i walked as far as my cable would allow me in different directions, just to hear how i projected.

 

that's what i love about having different basses. they're just different, and the change in tone and feel inspires new ideas in me that a single bass just couldn't do on its own.

 

i mean, i love how versatile my cirrus BXP is for cover gigs, especially combined with the EQ and voicings of my amp. i can get just about any tone i want with that setup. certainly they're convincing enough live. technically, i don't need any other basses.

 

but there's a lot to be said for the basic tone and feel of a bass being different from another. that's why i feel at home when i pick up a sterling in a store. i know what it sounds like, and it never feels wrong. that's why it'll be the next bass i buy. and it will be different in just about every aspect from my P clone and my cirrus BXP.

 

anyone else feel like this?

 

robb.

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I've felt that way about my BB414 lately. I just like how it's different from my BB605. Passive vs. active, 4 vs. 5, slightly different string spacing, etc. It's to to change things up spmetimes. I just wish I had more than 2 basses to switch.
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Originally posted by robb.:

that's what i love about having different basses. they're just different, and the change in tone and feel inspires new ideas in me that a single bass just couldn't do on its own.

 

anyone else feel like this?

 

robb.

I absolutely can identify with this. Just as [most people] would drive a 2-seater sports car differently from a big-ol' SUV, a different bass can inspire you to take a different approach.

 

Right now, I'm going through a thing with new songs where I like to try them out on each bass and see which one "speaks" to me. I'm having a lot of fun doing that.

 

Yea, I'm with ya man!

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My Toby has served me well these (almost) five years, and I am seriously jonzing for a new axe. Whatever it is, it will be P, probably P/J and definitely passive.

 

 

To everything there is a season.

A time for frets, a time for fretless,

A time for precision, a time for jazz,

A time for passive, a time for active,

A time to RAWK, a time to get funky.

- Matt W.
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Nice, Matt... very nice.

 

I own three* very different basses that you would have to pry from my cold, dead hands. And I agree with Mr. Thumb that, while they sonically sound different, it is more how I approach them that keeps me interested.

 

* Of interest? The three are my Warwick Thumb 5, Rob Allen MB2-5, and Mike Lull M5V. The Mike Lull M5V is the newest addition and has been getting the most attention, both live and in the studio. The Rob Allen sees work at least weekly for a project currently in the works where I use it exclusively. The Warwick sees a lot of attention at home, and I still consider it the best sounding bass I have ever played; pulled to passive, plugged in direct, nothing sounds better. It sits perfectly in the mix and sounds like a bass should sound.

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the reason i ask is because people regularly post, "what bass was used...?" or "how do i sound like...?" types of questions.

 

and invariably someone (sometimes me, even) says, "with a versatile bass and smart EQ, you can nail that tone and a million others." and while that's true to a large extent, i really like how a sterling sounds like a sterling. and while on a cover gig it's more convenient to use the neck pickup and some EQ on the cirrus BXP to get a P tone, sometimes i just like to plug in and play the P clone.

 

and this most recent event made me think about it a little more.

 

robb.

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It's definitey cool...having some very different sounding basses. That's where I'm at right now in my quiver.

 

I've been thinking really hard though, and I've come to a decision. I want to get down to three. One would be my first bass, and a backup at best. Simply because I can't let it go. The other two would be very similar, one fretted, one fretless.

That's atleast where I want to be. I'd rather have a comfortable place to try out various techniques and ideas fo versatility, rather than a wide array of axes.

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