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radius announcement from Radar O'Reilly


g.

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Totally agree with you gb. I've always wondered why they were radiused (is that even a word?).

 

I suppose that in theory it could make it easier to play with sloppy, over-exagerated right hand technique but that's about all I can come up with.

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None of my guitar fretboards are flat and I currently have 4 - the only flat fretboards I *ever* had was on my very first Spanish and a *very* old framus 12 string.

 

Most have about a 9.5" - 12" radius.

 

G.

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=738517&content=music

The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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I think that the natural curve of the finger lies across a radius-ed board better. That could just be my prejudice, I realize.

 

I imagine a bass line of 10th, repeated...A-C#. On a flat board, it would seem to me that my index finger would kinda lock my hand making it harder for my second finger to play that C#. Kinda like the chord shapes jeremy referred to.

 

Now, if they'd just add a radius to those pickups.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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One of many flat radius basses built by JP Basses:

 

 

http://www.jpbasses.com/A558A4/jpbasses.NSF/img/glen/$File/2.JPG

 

It must have been around a year ago he went strictly to flat radius for all his builds, about the same time many ERBers were wondering if it wouldn't be better for reaching low pitches across wider necks (among other things).

.
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Considering the electric bass is a descendant of the URBs of the Middle Ages, perhaps nobody thought about it much. OTOH, a slightly radiused fretboard would provide a little more area for gluing the fretboard on, but I don't think that's the reason for it.

 

All I know is my fretting fingers tend to curve when I grab the fretboard, but that could be muscle memory. Although I prefer a flatter fretboard past the 14th fret, I don't see a signigicant advantage to any radius on a bass neck, but that's just me. YMMV.

:wave:

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On my humble Toby 4 stringer the 16.5" radius is too flat for my liking. Or the neck is too thin for my liking. Or both. I tend to favor something like the G&L 4-stringers with a 12" radius and a bit more meat behind it.

 

 

Brief experience with a Conklin GT-7 tells me that flatter is probably better on extended range instruments.

- Matt W.
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Originally posted by greenboy:

The fingers curve, regardless of radius. One would still normally use fingertips to stop the strings.

ah, but there's more than one way to stop a vibrating string. (which adds value to your argument about a flat radius)

 

and yes, I don't consider myself normal by any means. I don't even know if there's a "normal" person on this planet, but if there is, he/she is sorely outnumbered...

:D

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I prefer having a 7 or 9" radius on my basses because I started on Fenders and prefer that feel. My suspicion is that Leo started with the 7" radius because he felt it would make playing more comfortable for doubling double bassists.

 

The advantages of flat-radius fingerboards are well-founded, since classical guitar makers have been making nearly-flat or flat fingerboards for more than a century. I consider it a matter of preferance.

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