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good advice


outlawlebo

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Don't give up. Giving up is the only SURE way to fail.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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davebrownbass has the most important one covered (which I failed to adhere to... :rolleyes: ), since it is not just "one thing" to playing bass. The list includes virtually every topic you ever see here.

 

I'll add one thing, though: "Playing with a metronome or drum-machine". Others may cringe, but playing-along with MP3/CDs can substitute for this for me personally, since recordings (studio, anyway), are generally done with the drummer following a "click-track".

 

I've always had a pretty good sense of rhythm, but when really hunkerin' down with a metronome, I found I'd speed-up or slow-down when I started getting fancy. In a band situation, it throws-off the whole sound if you do that.

 

Even more than pitch, having folks play "on the beat" (or a smidge ahead or behind) is the most noticable thing to me. Ever hear an elementary-school "concert band" perform? Hilarious!

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When i had been playing in a band for about one year, I took a few lessions. The first thing the teacher told me was that I should try to use more fingers of my left had. I was hiding my pinkie. I still think that the "one-finger-per-fret" was the best advise I´ve got even though over 30 years has passed. The pinkie might feel weak in the beginning but if you use it, it´ll grow stronger. Maybe this isn´t of an importance if you have big and strong hands from the beginning.
What ever...
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"You just proved that you can play it right. Now you have no excuse to screw it up." -- Maurice Allen

 

and

 

"There are two kinds of mistakes, forgivable and unforgivable. Missing a note or overshooting a shift in a fast passage is excusable if you're sight reading. Forgetting what key or time signature you're in or simply not paying attention is unforgivable and punishable by death." -- Art Pranno

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Play as much as you can. Where ever possible try to mix it up a bit.

 

Just because you are doing something different from the "standard" way of doing things, be it technique, equipment, or settings, it doesn't mean it's wrong. If it sounds right to you it is right.

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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Listen...

to everything that's out there. Rock, Jazz, Country etc. and etc. There's something to learn from everyone that you can adapt to your gig.

We just finished playing our Christmas program last night and covered an updated version of a tune from "Messiah". What a great bass line!

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And Now For Something Completely Different:

 

Good Advice

 

I know a man named Otis who invented a room,

And his heart was filled with pride.

I said to Mr. Otis, "What does your room do?"

He said, "It goes from side to side."

So I said, "Mr. Otis, if you take my advice,

You'll be the richest man in town.

You gotta take that room that goes from side to side,

And make it go up and down."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

I sincerely doubt

That the world could do without

My good advice.

 

Sir Isaac Newton came around to my house one day.

His face was all sunburned and red.

He said he didn't want to sleep in the shade of a tree,

Because an apple might fall on his head.

I said, "Sir Isaac, you dumbbell, take my advice.

Go right back there and sleep beneath that tree.

And if you let that rotten apple fall down on your head,

Why you'll discover gravity."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

The world's a better place,

Since I gave the human race

My good advice.

 

A man named Mr. Waterman invented a tube.

He was sad because it sprung a little leak.

He said, "Darn it, when I hold my tube on a piece of paper,

The ink leaks out and makes a little streak."

He said, "I've gotta find a way to stop that leak.

I'll start working on my leakproof tube again."

I said, "Waterman, you idiot, don't stop that leak.

You just invented a fountain pen."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

I'm so worldly wise,

I should get the Nobel Prize,

For good advice.

 

Good old Henry Ford, he was a hardworking man.

He worked all night and all day.

I said, "Henry, watcha doin'?"

And Henry, he said, "I'm inventing the Chevrolet."

He said, "I've already built twenty-five models,

One for each letter from A to Z."

I said, "Henry, you fool, there are twenty-six letters in the alphabet.

He said, "Good heavens, I forgot the Model T."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

It's fruitful as can be,

And it's absolutely free.

My good advice.

 

Wilbur and Orville were two brothers named Wright.

The nicest pair of kids you've ever seen.

They worked twelve years on a secret project.

They thought it was a washing machine.

I said, "Fellas, what are all those wings for?"

They said, "For hanging clothes out to dry."

I said, "You fools, take that washing machine out to Kitty Hawk,

And see if the darn thing'll fly."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

I'm so smart that I'm

Gonna win a Guggenheim,

For good advice.

(One more time)

 

Benjamin Franklin was a charming old man,

He was always flying his kite.

One night I said, "Benjy, why ain't you out with your kite?"

He said, "Because it's raining tonight."

I said, "Benjy, sweety, you go right back out there,

And to your kite string tie a key.

This may shock you, Benjy my boy,

But that's electricity."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

I'll be fond of you

If you'll only listen to

My good advice.

 

Ooga Magoog was a Neanderthal man,

A very poorly educated soul.

He had a great big square thing made of solid stone,

And in the middle of it was a hole.

One day he had to go from his cave in Natchez

To his uncle's cave in Mobile.

I said, "Round off those corners

And buy a set of tires,

And Ooky baby, that's a wheel."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

Harvard offered me

A Phi Beta Kappa key

For good advice.

 

Sigmund Freud, he had an unfurnished house.

He was a very nosy fellow, so it seems.

He had no chairs,

So he made all his friends stand around all day,

And tell him all their secrets and their dreams.

Well, while they stood there talking 'till they got fallen arches,

They yelled, "My feet are killing me. Ouch!"

I said, "Sigmund, don't you realize you've got a gold mine here.

Go out and buy yourself a leather couch."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

Every word you're told

Will be 18 karat gold,

That's good advice.

 

Alexander Graham Bell was building a fence

With some wood, and a long piece of wire.

He said, "There's something strange going on around here.

I keep hearing the voice of Uncle Myer."

I said, "Mr. Graham Cracker," (that was my little joke)

"With that wire you got the world in your palm.

Just get a mouthpiece, and an earpiece, and a piece in between,

And you'll sponsor The Telephone Hour."

 

And that was good advice, good advice.

Good advice costs nothing, and it's worth the price.

Every word ya hear

Is the message of the year,

It's good advice.

 

Christopher Columbus was a seaman second class

When I told him that the Indies could be found

By sailing to the West instead of sailing to the East.

I advised him that I thought the world was round.

(I really thought so.)

And then I sent him down to ask good Queen Isabella

To pawn her jewels for all their worth.

Next day he set sail, and as everyone knows,

He fell off the edge of the Earth.

 

And that was bad advice, bad advice.

Bad advice is just the same as good advice.

Everybody makes

Occasional mistakes,

And that was bad advice.

 

Thank you, Alan Sherman

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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Originally posted by Graham Jacobs:

I'd like to add to what Philman has said:

 

Be as aware of the spaces you create, as the notes you play.

You can stop now -jeremyc

STOP QUOTING EVERY THING I SAY!!! -Bass_god_offspring

lug, you should add that statement to you signature.-Tenstrum

I'm not sure any argument can top lug's. - Sweet Willie

 

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Originally posted by PhilMan99:

Even more than pitch, having folks play "on the beat" (or a smidge ahead or behind) is the most noticable thing to me. Ever hear an elementary-school "concert band" perform? Hilarious!

Hee hee my school is nation wide renound and makes over £8000 a year....

and I've been learning to read notes for a month and am expected to join next year !

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Originally posted by Dave Brown:

Good old Henry Ford, he was a hardworking man.

He worked all night and all day.

I said, "Henry, watcha doin'?"

And Henry, he said, "I'm inventing the Chevrolet."

How does that work? The Chevy Model T, huh?
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Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,

And sorry I could not travel both

And be one traveller, long I stood

And looked down one as far as I could

To where it bent in the undergrowth;

 

Then took the other, as just as fair,

And having perhaps the better claim,

Because it was grassy and wanted wear;

Though as for that the passing there

Had worn them really about the same,

 

And both that morning equally lay

In leaves no step had trodden black.

Oh, I kept the first for another day!

Yet knowing how way leads on to way,

I doubted if I should ever come back.

 

I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference

 

--Robert Frost, "The Road Not Taken"

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