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1966 Fender P Bass Price


dp music

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Over $7,000 I would venture. I played a very nice 66 p bass in hollywood gc not too long ago, It actuallyplayed and sounded much nicer that a few pre cdb p's they had around. It had a very lievely resonance, there was also a 63 p bass that had that same feel. it was like they were alive. The 66 was listed at something around $7,300.
Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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Why would anyone pay $7000 for a p bass. Even though it's a 66 that's a cbs p bass.

 

I've played since 65 and owned lots of early 60's Fender basses, and i'm here to tell you a new american made P Bass is just as good as any of the old ones. There are a number of boutique makers who make a better fender bass than fender ever did. This is the golden era of guitar making.

 

IIf someone played a 66 p and a 96 p behind a curtain you couldn't tell the difference.

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Originally posted by dp music:

what kind of price should i expect for a '66 P Bass

that is in great shape with all original parts and valid serial number?

just curious,

thanx

dp

IMHO, it's close to the dealer price of a new Saturn or Hyundai with the standard package. Plus the finance rates are much closer to 0% than you'd get for buying the '66 P Bass.

 

OTOH, it depends on what coast you're closer to. A left-coast bass (CA, OR, WA) or right-coast (NY, DC, FL) will get higher bidders than one selling in the Midwest or deep South. (which is why I stopped going by those estimates from the "Blue Book" guides)

 

My general rule of thumb is as follows:

-the "asking price" is about 20-40% over the real value of the instrument

-the "blue book" price is OK for the Midwest/South but add 20-30% to that for the costal US cities

-to the above, add another 33-50% and you'll get the asking price if it's being sold overseas

-if it is altered in the slightest or is missing a screw or has a fingernail-size scratch on it, it is worth 20-60% less than the asking price

-if the instrument was owned by someone famous (certificate of authenticity required or a valid signature) then it will be worth 300% more than it's real value, even though it might've been smashed onstage. Make that 500% for a charity auctioned-instrument.

-when it is sold and leaves the store, the value immediately drops about 15-25% from what you paid for it, even though you just paid for it 5 minutes ago.

 

Sounds confusing? It is. Sounds ridiculous? It is.

Are those real prices? Usually, but since "a sucker is born every minute' (P.T. Barnum) you can get more if you know how to sell your product.

 

How can you tell you're buying a genuine vintage instrument? Unless you know how to spot forgeries (and I've seen some good ones from people I can't name outright) you can't tell.

 

Are the reissues like the originals? Not exactly, but they're going to cost you much less and are very close to an idealized clone of an original.

 

My apologies to those legitimate instrument dealers on this forum and out there. You know who you are and I don't mean you. But I have a hard time justifying instrument inflation when my paycheck hasn't kept pace with that. So I'll stick with the reissues and clones and save up for a new Saturn or Hyundai.

 

One more point of confusion is the actual date of the parts. A '66 P-Bass may contain a neck that was finished in '65 and not assembled when Fender was sold to CBS and there was some delay in getting instruments finished and sent to market. If you were to unbolt the neck and discover a '65 date stamp it might indicate a pre-CBS neck, but then the act of unbolting the neck can devalue the instrument another $500-$1,000.

:wave:

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Originally posted by Big Daddy from Motown:

Why would anyone pay $7000 for a p bass. Even though it's a 66 that's a cbs p bass.

 

IIf someone played a 66 p and a 96 p behind a curtain you couldn't tell the difference.

There is a difference between collectors and players.
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Originally posted by getz76:

Originally posted by Big Daddy from Motown:

Why would anyone pay $7000 for a p bass. Even though it's a 66 that's a cbs p bass.

 

IIf someone played a 66 p and a 96 p behind a curtain you couldn't tell the difference.

There is a difference between collectors and players.
Yep.

 

The Mike Lull P4 that I had built for me a year and a half ago sounds amazing and I got it for considerably less than $7000. I could have scored 3 Lull P4's for that much scratch; and had money left over for strings and things. I used said P bass on one song for my band's latest album. The producer told me it was the nicest sounding P bass he's ever heard.

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dp music, where are my manners?

WELCOME TO THE FORUM, BROTHER LOWDOWNER! :wave:

Glad to have you hang with us, and we hope to live up to our reputation as forum where people tend to treat each other with respect (if not love) despite your age, years of experience, amount of melatonin in your skin, music preferences, and political affiliation of your home planet.

 

Second, your P-bass is worth good bucks, but did you consider the fact that, once you sell it, you may not be able to afford another?

(OK, you've got a '62 Jazz Bass in the attic that you've willed to your grandson upon your death) Ready for the pain of separation?

 

Third (I left this out before) you might want to browse them on eBay to get a feel for their current market prices. After viewing a few hundred auctions you'll be better equipped to rate your own slab o'Paradise. And let me reneg on my "Blue Book" rant and say they do have a good section in front showing various vintage instruments and giving you an idea on how to rate your instrument quality in terms of finish and mechanical wear. I've used mine so often I keep it on top of the toilet tank for EZ reference.

:D (simmer down, gang, let's hear what's on top of YOUR toilet tank, ok? back issues of BassPlayer, you say? how to speak Brooklynese? Betty Page "art prints"? the Star Wars official guide to Empire, Republic and Rebel Alliance fleet vessels? the Sunday comics section?)

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I think "great shape" is going to have a lot of influence on the price.

 

Perfect shape, not a scratch, not a nick, etc.. will fetch the high prices listed above.

 

Pictures would be great to look at, and some of the more knowledgeable players here might be able to give you more insight.

 

I saw a '66 Jazz go for less than $2,000 a few months ago and it had been played but was still fairly original.

 

I've been watching a '60 P-bass, refinished w/ non-original pup (Rio Grande) and some weird fake gemstones hastily installed where the top-dots are. It is listed at $1,500 but could probably go for $1,000 cash (that was the sale price when the '66 Jazz was sold).

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I think for $7k, you are looking at the collector's market. For that price you better have the original case, the manual, all accessories, original bill of sale, etc. Condition is subjective, whereas physical things are not.

 

A player's '66 would likely be at about $2500, but only for the "best of breed".

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Originally posted by Fred the bass player:

dp music, where are my manners?

WELCOME TO THE FORUM, BROTHER LOWDOWNER! :wave:

Glad to have you hang with us, and we hope to live up to our reputation as forum where people tend to treat each other with respect (if not love) despite your age, years of experience, amount of melatonin in your skin, music preferences, and political affiliation of your home planet.

 

Second, your P-bass is worth good bucks, but did you consider the fact that, once you sell it, you may not be able to afford another?

(OK, you've got a '62 Jazz Bass in the attic that you've willed to your grandson upon your death) Ready for the pain of separation?

 

Third (I left this out before) you might want to browse them on eBay to get a feel for their current market prices. After viewing a few hundred auctions you'll be better equipped to rate your own slab o'Paradise. And let me reneg on my "Blue Book" rant and say they do have a good section in front showing various vintage instruments and giving you an idea on how to rate your instrument quality in terms of finish and mechanical wear. I've used mine so often I keep it on top of the toilet tank for EZ reference.

:D (simmer down, gang, let's hear what's on top of YOUR toilet tank, ok? back issues of BassPlayer, you say? how to speak Brooklynese? Betty Page "art prints"? the Star Wars official guide to Empire, Republic and Rebel Alliance fleet vessels? the Sunday comics section?)

funny. thanx for the warm welcome. yeah, it's a pretty one.

i just played it and i already have some sellers guilt! but i play the music man 99.9% of the time! as they say, "if you haven't worn it in 6 months"...

dp music.

http://www.davepelman.com/

 

"there are no mistakes, only happy accidents." -Bob Ross, from "Painting With Bob Ross".

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