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What do you think about this hypothesis?


bbrraadd

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Hello everyone,

 

I've done a search and found some information, but not exactly the answers i'm looking for so i thought i'd post this question for discussion and feedback.

 

I have a USA fender jazz and recently i broke my E string. I restrung the bass with a new set of the same strings and setup the bass (needed tweaking with the wildly fluctuating humidity in NYC). Now, my E string has dead notes at G and A. I never had this before. I'm leaning toward thinking that I just have a bad string because:

 

1. If i play the octave of the G and A on the E string (above the 12th fret), I get the same deadness, and,

 

2. If I play (in the same octave) G and A on the A string (at frets 10 and 12 respectively) i get no deadness. So this tells me the the neck is not somehow resonating with that frequency and sapping it, and,

 

3. I've adjusted the hell out of my truss rod, this way and that in case it was making contact with the neck internally and somehow damping those frequencies.

 

Is my thinking correct here?

 

thanks,

Brad

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A bad string that doesn't ring properly typically has an out of round situation that would affect all notes above the position of the fault. I doubt it's the string, though I don't know everything.

 

Just for the helluvit, put a wood clamp or something similar on your headstock to see if the dampened notes move. It's not unusual for a Fender and others to have the frequently encountered B-C dead spot on the G string, and, for example, Fat Finger is a device (a weighted clamp) that moves that resonance.

 

Beyond that, dunno.

1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

 

[highlight] - Life is too short for bad tone - [/highlight]

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Take it to a pro. Also - look at the fretboard where the neck meets the body. See if the lamination has separated. This happens with rosewood boards. If its Maple.....

 

Tweaking the hell out of the truss rod is a no-no.

 

It takes about a day or so (depending on the climate) for the neck to settle accurately to the rod adjustment. Some necks appear to adjust quickly, but you still have to wait.

 

Humidity and proximity of a radiator/heater could have created slight separation at the joint.

 

repeat: take it to a pro.

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Originally posted by bbrraadd:

3. I've adjusted the hell out of my truss rod, this way and that in case it was making contact with the neck internally and somehow damping those frequencies.

 

Danger, Will Robinson!

 

Truss rods are definitely not things to "adjust the hell out of". They are things to adjust gently, and then leave alone for a day so that the adjustment settles in.

 

Buy a new string. Try it out. The single string shouldn't set you back too much. At least that way you can control for one variable in the equation.

 

Peace.

--SW

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Originally posted by jeremy c:

How did you break an E string in the first place?

 

I've only seen one person break an E string in the last 40 years. It was Robert "Kool" Bell of Kool and the Gang. And he was really hitting the sucker.

 

The whole concert had to stop while a new string was being put on his bass.

I broke an E string once before. It was a set that needed to be changed soon anyway but it broke on the next to last song of one of my old band's early shows. I had really crappy amplification back then and I was unwittingly playing harder than usual.
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I've broken E strings a couple of times. Not a good feeling. And I swear that I was not playing hard. Of course, after lengthy discussion on this topic (on this forum), I am playing with a much lighter touch and haven't broken any strings in at least a year.

 

:P

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I'd buy a new string and set the sucker up to factory spec and set the intonation properly, and then see where you stand.

 

Jacking the truss rod all over the place is a really bad idea. The slightest adjustment always seems to have a huge effect, in my experience.

 

I have an American Fender Jazz, too.

 

Would you like me to post the factory set up specs for the neck , the action, and how to set the intonation?

 

The bass comes with 45/65/85/110(taperwound E), by the way. I'm now using 45/65/85/105 non-taperwound.

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Ok, thanks for all the responses guys...

 

1. I didn't go hog wild on my truss adjustments, i did turn them 1/2 turn each way. I know that's frowned upon.

 

2. Where can you buy single bass strings? I've never seen this..

 

3. I broke the string while checking intonation on the E string and i noticed that i didn't have a "clean break" over the bridge. I pressed the string to flatten it and ... pop. It was 3 years old... man those half-rounds sounded good tho.

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I broke an E-string many years ago - I had boiled it a number of times and it was back in the days when I spent too much time rumbling along with Steve Harris's relentless galloping - the poor fatigued string had just played one repetive high tempo 16th too many...

 

Alex

 

P.S. Wow, "Quick Reply" really does lead to lots of pointless posts...

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I break E strings on my Sting Ray more often than other strings. I always put it off to the string thru the back and the acute angle the string crosses over the bridge.

 

I do tend to dig in though.

L Tucker

Nice, nice, very nice.

So many people in the same device.

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First, I'd go more slowly on the truss rod. Make an adjustment, string to proper tuning, and wait a day or so. Be sure that the neck moved a bit. If not, go to a professional.

 

As to the string, I was wondering if it got twisted. When installing strings, you can twist the string if you don't follow procedure (try looking at the BP archives on line for a nice explanation). And twisted strings don't vibrate properly.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Hi guys,

 

Thanks again for all the replies (try getting that at talkbass.com)

 

Just last night I restrung the whole bass with some new Ernie Ball 50-105 flats. My A note on the E string is still dead. So its not the strings. I don't really understand how the neck can dampen this frequency on this string when the same exact frequency (open A) is not dead.

 

Other ideas to try?

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It's not about the frequency being damped, it's about the movement at one of the nodes (i.e. nut/fret and bridge) cancelling out the movement of the string. The weird thing is that this dead spot is at such a low frequency, which would require the neck to be very dense and flexible. My best guess is that your neck joint is loose and that's causing the apparent flexibility. Check that your neck 'bolts' are tight.

 

Alex

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