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FIRST GIG WENT WELL!!


TShakazBlackRoots

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Blessings all. I managed to mail off my new album to Zeronyne. Hopefully he'll upload the songs for all to hear. :)

 

I have my 1st official gig on Valentines day! :eek: We'll be playing Soul music and a few Reggae tunes from the new album. Any pointers and tips from you on how to hold my nerve, be steady etc. will truly help. :thu:

I also feature on Bass this sunday Feb 6th at a big Reggae concert over here marking Bob Marley's birthday. I'll play bass on 5 songs. :)

Thanx for any tips in advance. :thu:

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TSBR, Glad to hear from you my friend and congrats on the upcoming gig!

 

First, make sure that you are well rehearsed so that you are confident with the tunes. I usually practice and listen to only the music that I am going to be playing for the gig in the week leading up to it. That way I can play my parts practically by reflex, this allows me to loosen up and be more aware of the other band members and perform rather than just play.

 

Second, accept that you are going to be nervous and learn to make that anxiety work for you rather than against you. I use that feeling to help me clear my mind and fully focus on the moment. I am only thinking on the music I am playing, not what has gone before or even the next song (I'll be there when I get there :D )

 

Usually, by about the second song the butterflies are gone and I'm in the groove.

 

Most important of all...HAVE FUN!

 

Good luck man, keep us updated! :thu:

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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the same basshappi says:

don't think of the next song when your eyes happen to wonder over the set-list during a song, it'll get you confused. focus on the NOW. all in due time...

 

also, try to get a feel of the stage. i mean that you don't have to feel restrained. walk around, get some laughs with the drummer, that kinda stuff...

 

good luck man! it'll work out, you'll see.

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Rule number one: Have fun!

 

Rule number two: Always look like you're obeying rule number one, even when you're not.

 

Rule number three: Stay tuned for bulletins on the London Musicplayer.com forum dinner coming up in a couple weeks!

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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Tedster's good advice notwithstanding, I'd say basshappi has it right.

 

TSBR, have a great show! (Uhhhh, I mean, break a leg...)

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Good luck on the upcoming gig. I second what everyone else is saying, just remember to have fun. The advice I can give you and have learned through experience is if you make a mistake keep moving. Chances are you are the only one that noticed. Stay calm and move on after a mistake, it will help the entire set flow better, and you will feel confident just forgetting about it. :thu:
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Get into the groove! Move around the stage a little bit and smile at all the ladies. Don't dig in too hard if you get nervous, which is my biggest issue when I play big shows. Keep your hands relaxed.
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One more thing: Have fun.

 

Usualy in the begining there´s a lot of tension going on in your head. As you get used to gig, you will feel more relaxed.

 

If you are well rehearsed, you´ll know everything that you´re suposed to do. It will flow.

 

One other tip: IF you make a mistake (it´s natural, you´ll even learn to laugh about it) don´t make that "oops" face. It´s very ugly when this happens. Just laugh about it cause it´s really no big deal. If you are confortable, the crowd will be. But if you got nervous...

 

See ya. Hope it helps.

Please, forgive my english, I don´t speak it very well
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Thank you thank you thank you all of you :thu: ! I'll keep all the tips in mind. I always have laughs with the drummer and keyboard players. One thing I gat going for me is I surely know how to improvise when I miss a part! ;) I even create my own groovy licks till I remember the parts :D

I'll fill you in on how it goes.

Didn't understand the part about the London Forum dinner :confused: . I'm in Uganda at the moment, so I'll miss that one.

Bless you all. :)

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Just remember this: So long as you keep smiling and don't let on, 99% of the audience will be totally oblivious to any mistake you might make in your playing during a gig. :)

 

It took me years to figure this out, and as soon as I did, the number of "clams" I played dropped dramatically. :D

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Knowing you from this board, I can't see you having any problems having fun on stage.

 

What makes a gig work is the preparation. Others have mentioned knowing your material, which is important. There are lots of other items:

 

Plan your equipment. Make a list of what you need and be sure it's in your bag(s). Check off "tuner" after you see it in your case. Check off "case" when the case is in the car/bus/whatever.

 

Know your job in the band. Are you supposed to test the PA? help set-up the drums? Do you position your amp after the drums are set up? who handles the relationship with the venue? And BE EARLY.

 

Help out. By being organized and knowing your role, you can offer help to that guitarist ("now where did I put that other cable? And where should I put my pedals?"), or the sound person, or whatever. Be ready to fix a crisis. Extra cables is obvious, but make your tuner accessible, have some kind of tape with you, extra set lists, etc. It may not be needed, but YOU are the bassist, so you are responsible!

 

I'm often responsible for the PA in my band, which means I have to juggle the setup of everything. But I also am decent at this, so the gig comes off OK (if not always perfect).

 

And try these two threads:

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=5;t=005759

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=5;t=005042

 

Have a great gig !!

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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All eventualities seem to have been covered here.

 

Remember, you are only responsible for your playing - nobody elses. It's fun! Paid practice!

 

What I do before each gig is put on my gig face. I tell myself "I am the best player around here. I am the master of my instrument. I sing well, I love doing this, the money's good and dog-gonnit, people like me."

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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Blessing on you, T.

 

Remember, the audience doesn't exist.

 

This gig is just your final rehearsal. Kick it, and after you start kickin', look out and see:

 

Friends.

 

Remember, when you do finally look at the crowd, they came because they WANT to hear YOU. They want you to do well. There are no judges sitting out there with scorecard in hand (my 8th graders have to suffer that!)

 

Have a blast!

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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All the advice above is excellent, everything.

 

To add to what mudcat said, a "mistake" is almost never caught by the audience and often not even by musicians in the audience. We are always our own worst critics, and it can be detrimental on stage.

 

The audience feeds off your vibe and your confidence and if the music is good and your doing your part they'll feel it. If you happen to make a mistake or miscue-- If, I know you probably don't make any mistakes :D -- the only thing to do is to get right back into the moment of the song and move foward. The worst "mistakes" happen when dwelling on previous mistakes so stay in or get back in the "moment" of the music.

 

Also, by being well rehearsed as said above, you should be able to play the tunes and feel the tempo when you are all all alone, and not "need" to hear anyone else for most things anyway. On stage you rarely can hear everything the same way you hear it in rehearsal, you may need to "cue' off of things you'd never had thought about or groove with things like seeing the drummer hit the high hat or feeling the puff of the kick drum on the back of your leg. Some times finding your place on stage is as much about being able to take cues as it is about anything else.

 

I don't know what your "set up" is but if you use effects or anything and you have a problem as you're setting up there is only one thing to do: simplify the chain and troubleshoot back at home. Put it out of your mind-- everything will work fine back home and you may never know what went wrong, but the point is to get rid of problems instead of "fixing" them as fixig wastes time.

 

Get there early and take out the bass and put it on a stand and protect it. If it aclimates to the club's temp and humidity tuning will be more stable later. Tune a couple of times before going on, tune when your up there at first and get real fast at checking your tuning of your obsessive complusive about it.

 

Lastly, you will want to rush the tempo without really knowing it-- I've never seen a first gig for anyone that didn't rush the tempo. I can imagine some tricks now that might help deal with it but I've never tried anything on stage because my first gigs are long behind me, as your's soon will be too. Just be aware that if things are being rushed it might be you and just groove and have a good time.

 

Playing shows is really just about the most fun you can have, it really is. Just relax and do your job, party after the gear is all secured off stage.

check out some comedy I've done:

http://louhasspoken.tumblr.com/

My Unitarian Jihad Name: Brother Broadsword of Enlightened Compassion.

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Along the line of what Tom said, make sure you plan for contengencies. TAKE SPARE FUSES, AND STRINGS! You will never blow a fuse on your amp, or break a string until the one gig where you don't have spares. Where do you get fuses? Radio shack, 5$ tops for all of your fuses. If you have a solid state amp you will generally have two types of fuses to attend to, line fuses and ac fuses. Consult the back panel text on the amp for the specs of both, or your manual. Never replace a fuse with one of a different rating, IT IS A BAD IDEA. That was my soapbox for today, thanks for your patience if you have read this :D
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Congrats on all the good work.

 

Nervousness is good thing. Turn it into musical energy. You can do this with confidence and mental focus. I will visualize the entire show, in realtime prior to playing. Find a spar hour or two and just mentally play the gig. Once you guys start playing out regularly your sets will be ingrained in your head so you won't need to visualize them anymore. As the others have said, Have fun. The audience is there for a good time, so give it to them.

Together all sing their different songs in union - the Uni-verse.

My Current Project

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Tom C brings up a very good point. Have a spare "___________" for yourself, your guitar player, etc.

 

I always keep 2-3 patch cables, 3-4 instrument cables, 1 mic cable, 1 speaker cable, and 1 pair of drumsticks in my gear box that goes with me. Not to mention extra earplugs for whomever and guitar picks for my guitar player(s).

 

Duct tape and tools are must haves. Grab some screwdrivers, allen wrenches (allen keys), and a pair of pliers, along with a pocket knife or razor knife. A notebook and a marker always come in handy as well.

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Hey all! The gig went very well. I was a huge stage, so high up :eek: though! I did get a huge cheer when I was introduced ;) . It's ages since I last performed in this country (1995 or so was the last). The crowd was used to seeing me as a lead singer years ago!!

I came on stage carrying my axe after the first band had played. Plugged in my bass and off we went. Crowd was crazy like most Reggae audiences, bubbling. We had about 6 bass bins!! :eek: Bass was heavy and sweet.

I did improvise alot, creating my own groovy basslines on Bob Marley's tunes. Band was impressed. :thu: Thanx for all your advice. Next up, Valentines day gig....more upmarket audience (at the Cafe De Paris restaurant over here). :rolleyes:

The guitarist for this gig is amazing, so is the keyboard player. I'm looking forward to that. Fingers crossed.

Bless you all. :)

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Congratulations TSBR! I knew that it would go well for you. I wish I could have been there.

 

Best of luck with your Valentine's Day gig as well.I'm sure that you will bowl them over.

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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Originally posted by NUTT:

Tom C brings up a very good point. Have a spare "___________" for yourself, your guitar player, etc.

That's pretty funny...I actually needed a drum key the last time I played in church...to loan to the drummer, since I was playing bass! Good suggestion...bring backup stuff for other people...I like it...

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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I always carry all sorts of small gadgets/things in my gig bag. Turn keys, screw drivers, spare batteries, cellotape etc... :D Must be the reason my gig bag is tearing and bursting at the seams!! :eek: Must try and get a leather one.
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Originally posted by TShakazBlackRoots:

I always carry all sorts of small gadgets/things in my gig bag. Turn keys, screw drivers, spare batteries, cellotape etc... :D Must be the reason my gig bag is tearing and bursting at the seams!! :eek: Must try and get a leather one.

A duffle bag won't hurt.
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A duffle bag? :D Yeah right! Might as well carry a trunk! :eek:

Thanx Connie Z. Bass bins are subwoofers (I think). You should see the ones that are used by Jamaicans on their sound systems :eek: ! They're like small houses. :D

Any, just think of a wall of bass speakers, that's what we used. On the Valentines day gig, we'll have 4 EV bass woofers as part of the PA. Can't wait! :)

One Love

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