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rosewood vs. maple fingerboard


twentyamptwist

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i love maple there a smooth feelin given off by the finish, 2 bad i got all rosewood necks tho. maybe ill swap the neck on my fender,,,,,

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-'04 MIM Jazz bass black

-'98 Fender American-Deluxe P-bass natural

-Peavey FuryII blue

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I own one bass with Maple and one with Rosewood. I have never given it a thought. My only thought is that the Maple may be a harder wood and therefore be more durable. But, I am not sure how anyone can compare the "sound", when there are so many other factors involved, even if the bass's were identical makes.

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I've got basses with Maple, Rosewood, Pau Ferro and Composite (graphite) necks.

 

I don't think I have a favorite. All those neck types work with the different strings, body woods and electronics to sound different. Playability seems similar to me. Whichever bass I chose to use depends on how it fits the music I'll be playing...

 

...and my mood, that day.

 

Jim

Jim

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Funny you should ask :D

I just got finished experimenting with this.

I was longing for a maple board again, as I have

not had one since my 2nd bass (1978) and I felt

I was missing something. I have the ebony board

Kubicki x Factor and a rosewood board P/J (Kubicki

Fender replacement neck) and my J bass with a

rosewood board '66 Precision neck - well long

story longer - the '66 neck went bad and I sold

to a luthier in Sweden (would have been $450 to

$600 to repair) and bought a maple board version

of the same Kubicki-for-Fender neck I have on my

P/J from a friend! It was made a year or so after

mine (1981).

 

So I am able to compare the sound and feel of the

2 necks to some degree and compare, on the J

bass - maple vs rosewood, same everything else.

 

To my ear - the maple is far edgier and almost

harsh through the Hartke 10's/EVM 15 rig, but

with a really lively midrange that really makes

it CUT when I slap. When used through a single 15

rig the maple really out-voices the rosewood,

probably for the same reason it sounds almost too

much on a rig with a lot of high end articulation

 

Funny thing is the way it has a totally

different feel that is much harder to move on.

Action is set up in the same range as the

rosewood, but this maple has little "vintage

frets" which I hate - so that could be why it

doesn't work for me, I LOVE big fat frets!

 

Think I am going to sell it, go back to rosewood

:rolleyes: My maple board lust has subsided...

if it ain't broke don't fix it...

unless you need the overtime.

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Uh oh... can a g****r player join in?

 

I haven't tried the different woods on bass (my bass has rosewood), but on g****r, maple fingerboards are WAY brighter sounding, too bright for my tastes. Rosewood has been my preference, though while I've played around on instruments with ebony boards, I've never owned one.

"Expectations are the enemy of music." - Mike Keneally

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i never even thought that the fretboard would have any difference in tone.

on a slightly OT sidepoint: does anyone know why you rarely see fretless boards in anything other than ebony or pau ferro?

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i never even thought that the fretboard would have any difference in tone.

on a slightly OT sidepoint: does anyone know why you rarely see fretless boards in anything other than ebony or pau ferro?

Fender fretless' have rosewood fretboards.

 

Maple is fretless i think partially due to the fact that it has a gloss finish on it, where rosewood and ebondy don't.

 

:D

 

i like both, rosewood is better for a smooth like feel, and maple is better for the high and agressive parts.

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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I guess I got what I expected. Thank you everyone. The problem is I am interested in the Sadowsky MV5-24/RV5-24 and short of playing both (hard to do with a custom shop bass - not well stocked - especially in Canada) it's hard to decide which one to get. I play rosewood on both my current basses (Ibanez SR405, SR485 fretless) and realize that any Sadowsky would smoke the Ibanezes. I am leaning to the maple for a more aggressive tone but wish I could compare the two for sound, feel, playability and that "je ne sai quoi" factor. Anyone have any experiences with these or any other Sadowsky models?

 

When I die and go to heaven I believe there will be a wall of Sadowskys...

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I like having the choice of both...

 

My Spector has a rosewood fingerboard, and my MIA Jazz Bass has a maple fingerboard.

 

If I had to choose one I'd probably choose maple, or at least if a Fender Bass was my only axe I would. I just like the way Fender necks feel with a maple fingerboard.

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I've got instruments with a variety of fingerboard woods. Right now, I have:

-Maple

-Rosewood

-Pau Ferro

-Synthetic

 

I've also had one with a cocobolo fingerboard.

 

They all present a different tone. The harder woods (maple, cocobolo) and synthetic tend to offer brighter attack, while rosewood and pau ferro are darker in tone and tend to, IMO, be a little more expressive.

 

It's easy to sit down and A/B rosewood and maple. Just go to any music shop that has Fender P-basses. Plug in one with a rosewood fingerboard and play. Then play almost the exact same instrument with a maple fingerboard with all of the controls set the same way. You're going to notice the difference on your own, and your ears are going to tell you what you like.

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maple without a doubt. only problem is, very few basses are made with stock maple necks so you're limited in your choces.

 

i did see see that ibanez came out with a great looking bass the RKB900 (link)

 

Features:

 

* Alder body

* One-piece maple neck (34" scale) with straight headstock

* 24 frets

* Hipshot licensed ultra-light tuners for superb tuning and better balance

* 2 Duncan Bass Line Quarter Pound pickups

* Leo Quann Badass II bridge

* Alder body the classic bass tone wood

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A Sadowski is more than just a bass, it's an investment. I don't think you're going to find out what you need to know in a thread like this. You'll either have to play them yourself & get the one you like best, or be prepared to do some swapping. Of course, you might get lucky.
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Originally posted by twentyamptwist:

The problem is I am interested in the Sadowsky MV5-24/RV5-24 and short of playing both (hard to do with a custom shop bass - not well stocked - especially in Canada) it's hard to decide which one to get. Anyone have any experiences with these or any other Sadowsky models?

 

As a Sadowsky owner...

 

Keep in mind that your neck choice is also your body wood chioce with the metro's. That makes the decision a lot easier.

 

If you like the old school vibe, get the rosewood/ alder. If you like the Modern-ish vibe get the ash/ maple.

 

I have PJ5 thats rosewood/alder and it's natural voice is about as old school as it gets. However it can still be a modern slap monster if you EQ that tone into it.

 

So, it's not like you're limited to any great extant. Roger doesn't make junk. It all kills.

 

The model# you quoted is a little confusing and doesn't really exist. If you mean the M5-24....then get the ash maple. Those things suposedly are all about "Modern" sound. Going alder /rosewood is kind of putting yourself at cross purposes.

IMOHO

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Makes no difference. It's mostly a matter of looks. The fret material probly has just as much value to the over-all design.

 

I do like Rockwood - Curbow used phenolic resin to reinforce the surface and overall durability.

 

Jaco used marine epoxy.

 

Just keep practicing and any bass will sound good in the player's hands.

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Originally posted by twentyamptwist:

Which do you prefer and why?

Maple for fretted work in modern rock, sustain and that "twang". Basically anything modern in venue.

 

Rosewood for fretless work (the "mwah") on blues, classic rock, soul, R&B and jazz.

 

(and although you didn't ask...)

Ebony for fretless work on modern rock and new age material.

:wave:

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