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I'm ordering Acmes on monday,I think. A LowB2 and a Lowb2W. I've searched high and low for info on these cabs and I've come to the conclusion that I just have to see for myself. The price is right,so I'm goin' in. The LB2W goes on the stage and the LB2 goes on a stand pointed at me. Small gigs will only get the LB2. Should I be O.K with my PLX 1602? I wanted Accugrooves,but I can't afford it.Thats my story.

 

I'll refresh this when I get 'em.

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Excellent. I'd get a pair of Low-B2s rather than one with mid/high and one without. A matched pair makes a great little PA or huge hi-fi and the extra mid/high drivers give the rig a little more cut when required. And 8 ohms, so you can bridge the PLX 1602 into them for a full 800W each. Enjoy!

 

Alex

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What are you putting into each Acme wattage-wise?

 

I have two Low B2 cabinets, 4-ohms each.

 

I'm powering them with a Stewart World 2.1.

 

Each cabinet is getting 650 watts. That's plenty.

 

I'd suggest 500 watts each. Bridge if necessary, I run mine at the same level all the time, so you won't need to mix the balance between cabinets.

 

Order the padded covers if you decide you like the cabinets. They're worth it. The cabinets are built like brick-sh*thouses, but the padded covers rock (by Tuki).

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Yep. I'll be doing what Claber said. 800 each. Thats my plan now,anyway. I wondered about the covers,too. I have Tukis for my Ampigs and they're great. I'll be getting those as well,now.

 

I'm going to think about getting two regular LB2s now as well. I usually don't like having a ton of highs in my tone,but from what I understand,these tend to be a bit mellower in that respect. Probably a good idea. Thanks.

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Definitely get the covers too - mine are unpadded and the cabs are still looking pristine after over 5 years.

 

I have a cunning little mod for these cabs which you may want to consider - order a pair of Low-B1 strap handles and fix one to each Low-B2, on the long side nearest the mid/high drivers. I've cut a hole in the covers so I can access the extra handle at all times. The Low-B2s are so light that I can carry one in each hand without too much trouble, and the third handle makes it easy to twirl them through narrow doorways and in and out of cars.

 

Alex

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I have 2 LowB2s (4 ohm, yeah I know - lack of foresight). I use a Demeter pre and a 1602.

 

Typically, I only use one of the cabs, but on occasion I use both. Obviously with one cab (bridge mono) I have plenty of headroom. With two cabs (parallel), it's 500 watts a channel. Thankfully, I have PA support for those larger rooms. On really low volume gigs I get away with one LowB2 and my old G-K 800RB.

 

Looking back, I shoulda sprung for the 2402... who knew?

 

C. Alex - I'm going to try the "stacked vertical" arrangement next gig. What did you feel was the biggest advantage to that?

 

Jim

Jim

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Originally posted by JBFLA:

I have 2 LowB2s (4 ohm, yeah I know - lack of foresight).

Likewise - Andy said 500W would be plenty so I ordered 4 ohm cabs to use with my Mackie M1400. When I decided I wanted a lighter power amp I did a whole bunch of research and decided to go for some serious headroom - bought a PLX 3002 which gives each cab 900W. I suppose I could bridge it into a single cab to get the full power, but 3000W into a 2x10" might be a little silly! :D

 

Originally posted by JBFLA:

C. Alex - I'm going to try the "stacked vertical" arrangement next gig. What did you feel was the biggest advantage to that?

Less boom because the cabs' acoustic coupling frequency is shifted lower and fewer drivers are getting boundary reinforcement from the floor. More clarity because you have speakers closer to ear level. Better projection because the column of tens acts as a line source down to 275Hz - amazing how it'll carry the bass's key frequencies right to the back of a big room. Smaller footprint (obviously!) And if you're in the corner of a room you can get the rig closer into the corner to get both boundary reinforcement and horn loading which really helps fill bigger rooms with lows without PA assistance.

 

And it looks more imposing - that could be a pro or con depending on the gig!

 

Alex

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Originally posted by C. Alexander Claber:

I have a cunning little mod for these cabs which you may want to consider - order a pair of Low-B1 strap handles and fix one to each Low-B2, on the long side nearest the mid/high drivers. I've cut a hole in the covers so I can access the extra handle at all times. The Low-B2s are so light that I can carry one in each hand without too much trouble, and the third handle makes it easy to twirl them through narrow doorways and in and out of cars.

 

Alex

I did the same thing and it is definitely worth it.

Wade

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Originally posted by C. Alexander Claber:

Excellent. I'd get a pair of Low-B2s rather than one with mid/high and one without. A matched pair makes a great little PA or huge hi-fi and the extra mid/high drivers give the rig a little more cut when required. And 8 ohms, so you can bridge the PLX 1602 into them for a full 800W each. Enjoy!

 

Alex

Agreed, I've used my bass cabs for Sound reinforment several times, couldn't do it if they both were not full range.

You can stop now -jeremyc

STOP QUOTING EVERY THING I SAY!!! -Bass_god_offspring

lug, you should add that statement to you signature.-Tenstrum

I'm not sure any argument can top lug's. - Sweet Willie

 

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i got a tuki for my ashdown 410..in hindsight, it didn't really have to be padded. Those covers are quite expensive.

 

I see that you guys use power amps that aren't specifically made for bass. Are power amps capable of coloring your sound even though all they do is step you up?

 

C.:

 

what do you mean when you say "acts as a line source down to 275hz"?

 

jason

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Originally posted by getz76:

A pair of Low B2's and ample power is insanely loud. :evil::evil::D

 

You have to completely change your approach to EQ. Start completely flat. No switches. Alembic F1-X if I remember correctly? I forget the flat settings for that preamp.

Flat settings are 3-8-3ville. Treb-mid-bass. I set it and forget it. I have this Raven labs EQ that I'll have to tweak. I would imagine that I'll be cutting lows and maybe boosting highs and high mids a bit. I can't imagine the sound not being in there. I'm super excited. I might order today.
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Originally posted by Gospel5theZealot:

[QB]i got a tuki for my ashdown 410..in hindsight, it didn't really have to be padded. Those covers are quite expensive.

 

I see that you guys use power amps that aren't specifically made for bass. Are power amps capable of coloring your sound even though all they do is step you up?

 

When I got my first high powered amp (mackie 1400i)I noticed that I didn't have to use as much bass freq. In fact,it was more dynamic overall. There is no topping out. Headroom.

 

Power amps are supposed to just be clean power,but I'm convinced that there is a difference. When I switched from Mackie to QSC,I noticed a wider freq range with more ultra highs and super lows and it seemed cleaner. I'm sure someone else can give you some better info based on fact rather than opinion,though. :D

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Originally posted by Gospel5theZealot:

what do you mean when you say "acts as a line source down to 275hz"?

A single speaker cone is what's called a "point source." Your mouth is a point source. The soundhole of an acoustic guitar is a point source. The sound comes from a single point and the waves expand outward in a spherical shape. Thus, the energy of the wave is dispersed over what might be considered the surface area of that sphere. Thus (basically) the mathematical foundation for the old rule that decibels decrease according to the square of the distance...double the distance from the source, you have 1/4 the decibels.

 

I'm sure there are natural occurences of line sources in nature, like ocean waves breaking on the beach, or thunder, etc, but it's not hard to envision them. A line source can be created when you put a bunch of point sources in a line. The more point sources you can cram in a space (increasing the ratio of sources/distance), the closer the approximation to a true line source you get. The harmonic reinforcement of the waves from each of the point sources makes the overall sound waves radiate outward in more of a wedge shape, like a cartoon slice of cheese in the mousetrap (not like a Kraft Singles slice of cheese). This means that the sound dispersion is like the surface area of a cylinder, which drops off in a linear fashion: double the distance from the speaker, only half the loss in decibels.

 

You see this arrangement often in large arena venues and shows. They'll have dozens of speakers hung down from the ceiling in a straight line that arcs backward a bit. It arcs because very little of the sound from a vertical line source goes up or down, so to get sound to the people close to and below the speaker array, they pull it back a bit.

 

Bose has a product geared to the use of musicians called the Personal Amplification System (or PAS) that uses a "cylindrical radiator" loudspeaker, which is a line source. There are several threads in this and other forums on this site about using the PAS. Some of them could give some insight on the advantages of having a line source. Also, Bose's web page has some info about line sources. Go to bose.com and follow the "Products for Musicians" link. I would link here but their webserver uses links which seem to break the UBB code tags on this forum.

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Originally posted by Gospel5theZealot:

I see that you guys use power amps that aren't specifically made for bass. Are power amps capable of coloring your sound even though all they do is step you up?

Well everything has some colour but the sonic differences between (decent) power amps are extremely subtle. IMO it comes down more to true power (and PA style amps tend to be honestly rated unlike some bass amps), weight (the lighter the better!) and features (low cut filters and limiters being key ones for me).

 

Originally posted by Gospel5theZealot:

what do you mean when you say "acts as a line source down to 275hz"?

As Clark explained, with point sources (any normal guitar/bass amp, PA speaker, human voice, etc.) the sound radiates in a (hemi-)spherical manner, which means that the SPL drops off by 6dB every time you double your distance from the source. With a line sources the sound radiatres in a cylindrical fashion, causing the SPL to only drop by 3dB every time you double your distance from the source.

 

The new Bose PAS system relies on this, as did the Grateful Dead's 'Wall of Sound' and in the last year or so line arrays have become very popular in concert SR.

 

What does this mean in the real world? If my Acme rig standing vertically is putting out 115dB at 2m distance (where I might stand on stage) then it'll be putting out 112dB in the front row of the audience, 106dB in the middle of the audience and 100dB for the furthest listeners (assuming a stage that is 4m from front to back, and an outdoor gig where furthest audience members are 8m from the front edge of the stage).

 

With the rig stacked horizontally it acts more like a point source and thus you get 115dB where I'm standing, 109dB in the front row, 97dB in mid-audience, and 85dB in the back row. So to get 100dB for the back row of the audience the rig would need to put out 130dB where I'm standing, which will require about 35 times as much power!

 

It's not quite this perfect in the real world, particularly as this rig is only a line source between 275Hz and where the midrange unit crosses over (1kHz-ish?). But I've really noticed how it helps carry the sound to the back of long rooms, where normally the bass would be lost and all you'd hear would be the cymbals, snare drum and the beaming guitar amp.

 

Originally posted by getz76:

Hit that B-string and tears of joy will start running.

Agreed - and I don't even have a B-string!

 

Originally posted by DONUT:

Done. I ordered two Low B2s yesterday. They should be around 2 weeks out. Andy said I sould go with two 8 OHM boxes and just be careful with the power. Can't wait!

Rock 'n Roll! Andy is well aware of the danger of excess power - the speakers that come back in tatters are almost always due to over-excursion or creasing damage. If you keep cranking the bass knob at high volumes it is possible to hurt the speakers but you can hear it happening long before damage occurs. Remember to break the speakers in - the surrounds are quite stiff and can cause cone creasing if you hit them with too much power early on.

 

Alex

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Would a good couple of hours playing through them at around half stage volume do the trick as far as breaking them in? I really don't have a place or the means to put music through them.

 

I usually keep my eq fairly flat. I'm not a booster,I'm a cutter. :)

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I would ask Andy for suggestions. Having new stuff break down is the second to worst thing that can hapen, the first is having it break down at the show :freak:
Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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Originally posted by DONUTHOLE:

Would a good couple of hours playing through them at around half stage volume do the trick as far as breaking them in? I really don't have a place or the means to put music through them.

Hmmm, I'm not sure. Ask Andy.

 

However I can suggest a handy trick for breaking in speakers: Connect them out of phase (so reverse the +/- connections on one cabinet), place them on the floor facing each other, and run a CD player through them. Turn up the volume so it's not loud enough to upset the neighbours but louder than TV listening volume (bear in mind that the bass should cancel out so it shouldn't go booming through the walls) and leave the CD player on repeat whilst you go out to work. Come home and they should be ready to gig.

 

Alex

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Andy just told me to "play rock'n'roll through them for a couple of hours at low volume".

 

Thats something I'm going to want to do as soon as I get 'em anyway. Beauty. They are being carpeted now,I guess. Can't wait!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well,I got 'em. Spent a good couple of hours playing through them last night. They really are everything said. Right down to the crappity handles. Claber's mod is DEFINITLEY in order. I wanna be able to carry 'em both in one trip. They're built like little tanks. Amazing little cabs.

 

So now,my rig seems like a total fresh start for every different room that I put it in. EQ wise,the only thing I have to fight is the room. I like this and I wish I would have caught on much earlier.

 

UNfortunately,I have this weekend off so I have two weeks to wait until the real test.........Competing with the skinny stringed tubers. I'm confident that they'll do the trick as long as one is up off the floor.

 

My band is also getting some 700 watt powered subs so that'll be cool and a load off my mind and speakers.

 

I'm planning on putting one on a stand,and one on the floor,or putting my rack on the stand and stacking them vertically on end.

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