Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Who Would You Like To See In A Private Lesson Column?


Ed Friedland

Recommended Posts

I'm going to be doing a new column in BP soon, a more advanced, private lesson-type feature. What I'm curious to know is - who do you think would be good candidates for this? It doesn't have to be a chops- fusion guy, just someone that does something interesting and unique. I have some preliminary people in mind, but being as I listen to mostly 1950-60's Country music, I'm a little out of touch.... ;)

 

If you could take a private lesson with someone well known, who would it be? Why?

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 68
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Kai Eckhardt

 

I forgot to put the why in the first time.

 

He has a unique approach to slap/fingerpicking/arpeggiating or whatever you want to call it. There is something he played on a Vital Information record that I have been trying to figure out for years.

 

He also has a very spiritual approach to music and creativity which I would like him to share with me.

 

And he plays with lots of Indian musicians and grooves right with them without seeming to bat an eyelash. I'd like to talk about that with him too.

 

I have met him and he is a wonderful person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chris Wood just because I'm interested in seeing where he comes from with his musical ideas.

 

John Paul Jones, I feel similarly about him. He wouldn't even have to talk bass, he could go on about hundreds of custom made instruments he has made for various purposes.

 

Bunny Brunel. Even though I've gotten lot of lessons from him already, I could always use a few more.

 

There are plenty of others. I think I would use my gold card to learn more about these artists as players and individuals. I think teaching a lesson is an incredible way to show people who you are. So I'd pick someone who is unlikely to have ever taught a lesson in BP, just so I could learn more about them.

Together all sing their different songs in union - the Uni-verse.

My Current Project

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, so many great people to choose from.

 

I'll say John Paul Jones as well, because he managed to fuse R&B grooves with rock in a way that's truly unique. I'd like some light on that.

 

I'd also have to say Duck Dunn. Not only has he played on some of the coolest hits ever, but he has such a brilliantly economical style, & can get a serious groove happening with just a few notes, carefully placed. Plus, his feel is incredible; it's very punchy & almost "lumbering," and yet it bounces at the same time. How does he do all that? Those are some feet I wouldn't mind sitting at.

 

Bob Babbitt. Another legendary groove monster. But he'd also be able to say quite a bit about being your player & finding your own voice, I'd imagine. Bigger shoes no one has ever had to fill, & Babbitt emerged with an identity of his own. Nice.

 

And how about Gerald Veasley, if only for a lesson on tone? I'm currently working on "Darling Dear" out of the Jamerson book, & Veasley's tone on that track could be spread on toast. Oh, and he plays real good & stuff.

 

One of my favorite bassists ever, but not one many would think of right off, is Dougie Thompson. He's a huge inspiration to me, & I think he's got it all: good groove, creative approaches, awesome tone, the works. A completely different approach to progressive rock, very economical & solid, while still making lines that have their own musical character. A private lesson with him? Yes.

 

Another economical, hard grooving, & vastly underrated player: Walter Becker. You see a pattern emerging; I'm fascinated by players who can do so much with so little, & Becker is a master at that. He'd have a lot to teach, I'd think.

 

There are so many...I'll just go one more (for now)...Chuck Rainey. Because he's Chuck Rainey. For "Black Cow" alone, Chuck Rainey. Then you add to that "Kid Charlemagne," "Green Flower Street," ... wow, what groove. He stands for R&B's greatest generation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was thinking about how unfortunate it is that we cant ever get the ability to ask Jaco or Jamerson for a lesson, but how amazing would it be to have a comprehensive lesson on each one based on say

....for Jamerson

Bob Babbit

Stevie Wonder

JAmes JAmerson Jr.

Some Funk brothers

....for JAco

the people who stepped into his shoes in weather report

his band members who got to intimately know his style

BRian Bromberg(he did cover a host of Jaco's compositions)

...

Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ed said:

I have some preliminary people in mind, but being as I listen to mostly 1950-60's Country music, I'm a little out of touch....

Move to Arizona, buy a cowboy hat - see what happens :D

 

I'll put my bid in for Jimmy Johnson. For an added bonus you can see if you can re-run some of those old columns of Anthony Jackson from the early Bass Player magazine days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second the John Paul Jones - i've always found Marcus Miller's technique something of a mind melter as well.

 

There is also a great jazz trio called EST - i can never remember the bassists name - but he uses some great effects with his upright. Also the guy from Red Snapper. (Sorry for being so vague - am just waking up and have HUGE hair!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ed, how about this? Thousands of us have our favorites. So, let's say you feature one of them (John Paul Jones) and then do a quick interview (say a 5-10 minute phone call to get the material) with a few working musicians out there who'd give us some insight into how that featured artist influenced THEIR playing. You can collect the material months in advance and work this through your other column ideas so that it doesn't have to be an "every month" routine.

 

Picture a JPJ column with a "round table" of those 3-5 other artists (making this up, so I'll say Flea, Geddy Lee, and a couple of others) and you ask each of them a common question, say "what JPJ song comes to mind as most influential to your creative growth?"

 

Feel free to take this out to the park, I give you carte blanche to do with no restrictions. And thanks for asking us "little people"!

:thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone that doesn't get a whole lot of ink but that I've admired is Tony Hall. One listen to his stuff with the Neville Brothers and you can fee the greasy-fried chicken funk pour from the speakers. No flash or acrobatics, just pure emotion. Love to get his take on tone, note choice, etc.
"Women and rhythm section first" -- JFP
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jerry Jemmott could detail some of his session work & who he borrowed from (or borrowed from him) among his contemporaries.

George Porter could talk about New Orleans styles & how he & J. Modelestie approached syncing.

Bootsy Collins could talk about his composing & electronics.

Brian Wilson &/or Carol Kaye could discuss bass lines in pop music.

Paul McCartney could outline the development of lines such as that in the Beatles "think For Yourself", where the bass line, while related to the progression, is virtually independent of it, or "She's So Heavy" where the style is unlike anything he did before or since. (He might seem unapproachable but I bet he's love to discuss musical details of his work.)

 

All---or whomever is selected---could address their ideas on how rhythm section players sync (& vary) the timing of their parts & how/when to support the other players & when to step free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

McCartney--what a great idea! I imagine that most of the interviews he gives are about him as a Beatle, as a songwriter, as a personality, as a cultural icon, etc. Who knows, he may find it refreshing to have someone show great interest in very specific creations of his on bass & want to get his insights as a working bassist.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would certainly be curious to hear from some of the players already mentioned. In addition --

 

I've learned a lot on this board from Jeremy Cohen and Dave Brown -- as well as others. It might be nice to have some input from guys like these who have a lot of years of teaching experience under their belts. :thu:

 

I would like to hear from some doublers, like Christian McBride and Chris Wood (and Dave Brown ;) ). I don't play URB, but I always feel like those who do have a different and useful perspective on electric playing.

 

It would be great to have something from Richard Bona. His sheer overall musicality awes me, and I would want to learn about how he develops musical ideas.

 

This is a really interesting thread, Ed. Thanks for inviting our comments.

 

Peace.

--SW

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What Sweet Willie said, I've already learned a lot from guys like Dave Brown and Jeremy, and not just about theory and chops. What about talking with the drummers that played with some of the bassists mentioned here, e.g., Ringo's perspective of playing with his Paulness, or Ziggy and George's take on the rythym section as a unit?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd have to say Marcus Miller, Nathan East or Neil Stunbenhaus- to try to find out how and why they were able to transcend the pack and become the world's most successful studio bassists. There are a million guys that can play, but these guys own the market.

 

Also, Matt Garrison, to try to get some insight into how he has been able to hold down the bass chair for some of the world's most influential jazz artists at such a young age. Kinda the opposite of why I'd want to hear from Marcus or Nathan. The studio side, the live side.

By the way, Ed. I am always impressed with your knowledge of the styles you discuss on your column. Enjoyed the recent Latin one. Being a freelance in Vegas, asked to read a production show one minute, playing in a traditional Salsa band another and playing in smooth jazz / funk scenarios amongst many other styles, I can really appreciate your diversity. Thanks for the help!- Adrian

Praise ye the LORD.

....praise him with stringed instruments and organs...

Let every thing that hath breath praise the LORD.

excerpt from- Psalm 150

visit me at:

www.adriangarcia.net

for His glory

Link to comment
Share on other sites

James J., Geddy Lee, JPJ, and Flea are great musicians.

But the most versatile, down to earth, no bull shit, no holes barred (sp?) teacher,and experienced bassist I've ever studied under is Chuck Rainey! This man I respect totally. Not one thing he has ever told me has been wrong for "me". And that is the way he shares, and instructs...on "your" level!

Vince

 

"Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up." ~ Pablo Picasso

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions, some may not be possible... but I see some good candidates mentioned. I'll have to digest this, I'm makin' a list, checkin' it twice... you know the rest.

 

Anyway, thanks for the responses. It's really hard to drag myself away from Merle and Buck and George jones for too long, but I'll check out some of these guys... MaCarthy? Jameson? Dunne? Raynee? Hmm, never heard of them....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

I've learned a lot on this board from Jeremy Cohen and Dave Brown -- as well as others. It might be nice to have some input from guys like these who have a lot of years of teaching experience under their belts.

Remember the Guitar Player issue on unknown greats (late '80s). I think Willie's onto something here.

There are a lot of great, unknown players (& educators) who could contribute some valuable info.

Tracking them down could prove interesting though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Fred the bass player:

Ed, how about this? Thousands of us have our favorites. So, let's say you feature one of them (John Paul Jones) and then do a quick interview (say a 5-10 minute phone call to get the material) with a few working musicians out there who'd give us some insight into how that featured artist influenced THEIR playing. You can collect the material months in advance and work this through your other column ideas so that it doesn't have to be an "every month" routine.

 

Picture a JPJ column with a "round table" of those 3-5 other artists (making this up, so I'll say Flea, Geddy Lee, and a couple of others) and you ask each of them a common question, say "what JPJ song comes to mind as most influential to your creative growth?"

 

Feel free to take this out to the park, I give you carte blanche to do with no restrictions. And thanks for asking us "little people"!

:thu:

I like Fred's idea. I subscribe to Modern Drummer, and I really enjoy these types of columns where artists who are famous in their own right give credit to another artist who influenced their playing.

 

As for me, I'd like to read how Paul McCartney influenced other bass players, and take my own "lessons" from him in print.

 

Maybe I ought to subscribe to Bass Player . . .

"All the world's indeed a stage, and we are merely players..."

--Rush, "Limelight"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a couple of ideas because I move with Bass players in the UK.

I would go for someone like either Phil Jarvis whos a prominent feature in bass circles or Mark King even but then again I'm sure BP Mag has already done Mark or even Stanley Clarke who I am sure would happy to be featured with his new Dragon Breath Alembic and I can help out here if you need to contact him.

As for Phil,If you want to see Phil in action and hes a brilliant teacher to, go HERE

Or you could try my soundclick page in my signature if you want to hear what he can do.

I certainly think Phils technic is pretty much unique and adpatable in todays music from his roots in Funk Rock to the Jazz Funk genre he now leads in.

Its well worth considering him and he would love to have a feature done on his playing aswell as offer up some insight in technic, slap and finger styles aswell as offer up some advice for people needing advice and guidance.

If you want to know more, I can send you some info, just private message me.

I think several people like what Phil does aswell as Ted and Offramp so maybe ask them what they think first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...