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Not enough wahhage?


Bass_god_offspring

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Does anyone happen to use, or know of any wah pedals that work for bass, that really WAH.

 

the Pedal i use (Cry Baby Bass), doesn't really do as much, uhhh....Wahing, as i'd like it to. i've heard that there is a way to change the part that effects that parameter, but don't know where to find it.

 

thanks.

 

keep it real :wave:

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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I don't use a lot of wah effect, however, I have a Boss 'Dynamic Wah' pedal that I use on one song. I have heard good things about the Cry Baby and the Morley's for bass, but haven't played them personally.

 

Cheers

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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I've yet to find a great bass wah. I gave up on having one on my board as I found an envelope filter and phaser did a better job of covering those tones.

 

The Real McCoy Custom 3 looks like it could do a pretty good job as it's extremely tweakable. However, once it's velcroed down you can't access the controls which is too restricting for a $285 pedal IMO.

 

Or consider a Moogerfooger low-pass filter with expression pedal attached. That could be the bomb.

 

An alternative approach: Instead of trying to get the wah to give you the sound you want to hear, try giving the wah what it needs to make that sound. Changing your attack, tweaking your onboard EQ, or running some overdrive before the wah could all give you a lot more wahhage.

 

Alex

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The problem with bass wah is that sweeping a bandpass means the bass content is only strong when the treadle is in the lower positions. Either that, or they can design it so the filter resonance isn't so sharp and tall, and then the pedal seems too subtle for most use.

 

I typically have like programables in multieffects for bass because they have LOW PASS versions available as well as BANDPASS so that the sweep never takes away from the low-end content. But they sure take some tweaking to make both a pronounced AND musically usable effect. Definitely tougher for the bass function and range than for guitar!

 

That said, Peavey's TranstubeFEX totally ruled for this because you could blend just the low end of the dry signal in with the swept and filtered signal. The Digitech BP-8 was pretty good too even in default factory patch parameters. And the Roland V-Bass wah is great for shifted and octave up but to do it good for bass one needs to assign the treadle to the envelope filter, which seems to be very flexible and toney.

 

Standalones should have a couple more knobs that actually includes the majority of the controls included on an envelope filter because basses (and rigs!) seem to vary enough to make this a real plus in getting the right sound. Either that, or a few presets.

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I never found the need for one, and suspect that I'd prefer an envelope filter instead.

 

Although I still regret passing up a package a few years ago. I can't remember if it was Morley or Dunlop that offered the "Wah 2 K".

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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unforunately this is another example of "guitar players have al the fun." bass effects, from what i've found, tend to more subtle than guitar effects. i guess the prevailing theory is that bass players don't want heavy effects.

 

ahh well.

 

or maybe wah unwell.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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It's tough to fulfill the bass function and still have the more outrageaous stuff going on. The effects have lower overtones to work on, which makes them change the support if set too radically. And it also makes it easier to mask. That's why I like bright strings and bass construction/woods for effects use, as well as strong rig with lots of fundamental.
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The best radical bass effects uses have often depended on multiple rigs (see some of the crazy ass stuff Bootsy has tried) and usually only get fair representation in a studio setting where lots of stanchioned tracking can supplement.
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If you must use a bass wah, especially if distortion is involved, I would highly recommend a *vintage*morley power wah with boost, as was mentioned above.

 

Its what I play now, after using a vox for a little while. The morley just has so much character, ans it sounds great when paired with a bigmuff. I love using the wah when I want to do an aggressive fill or when I just want to funk it out.

 

But it takes a lot of practice and foot precision to do it right.

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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BGO, just a thought here...you might want to try something like splitting your signal into two signals, cutting the lows/boosting the mids/highs on one copy of the signal, putting the wah on that, then mixing that back with the dry signal. I haven't tried that with wah personally, so I don't know how it would work...maybe great, maybe not.

 

HTH,

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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I mentioned the studio aspect of recording bass with effects. Maybe I should also underline that bass players themselves may not think their effects are that pronounced when standing on stage and being locally masked by cymbals and distorted guitars. But it's what the general mix is OFF the stage that determines whether it's right or not. Too much of SOME types of effects can make a mush out of all the definition of the bass and hide what is good about its tone, without replacing that with something that works for the arrangement or is worth hearing.

 

It's a lot easier for guitarists. I think that's why a lot of bass players give up on effects. But if you get some perspective on the situation you'll realize that for most effects, easy does it - unless you have rigs that can route signals in parallel or send different parts of the total sound to different cabs.

 

Again, it depends on the type of effect. But don't let what you hear in fron of your amp on a noisy stage throw you.

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Originally posted by Tom Capasso:

I never found the need for one, and suspect that I'd prefer an envelope filter instead.

 

Although I still regret passing up a package a few years ago. I can't remember if it was Morley or Dunlop that offered the "Wah 2 K".

 

Tom

I had a DOD Envelope Filter (the green one) that was very nice.
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I have a Morley Vol/Wah/Dist pedal, and I tend to use it mostly as a volume control, or as a ridiculous effect combining wah and distortion (which both grinds and offends :) ), than I do as a wah. It's ok for that, but just ok.

 

Like Tom, I prefer my Envelope Filter. (not to imply that Tom prefers MY envelope filter.

Not that I know of...)

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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