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Strap Position


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Hello all

 

How high or low do you strap your bass? I use to have my bass positioned a little below the chest, but i cannot seem to have thesame fluidity or speed or comfort as when I practice. So I raised it higher and it is now more comfortable. So where do you recommend it or what in your style of playing/experience is the most comfortable height to strap the bass, the least straining? Thanks

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right on my tummy.
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I typicaly have it a little on the low side.. not as comicly low as some people you see on tv but my strap is usually maxed out anyway. I'm not a small guy (6ft) and have a gut. The center of the bass is a little lower then my (substantial) belly button. If I could find a slightly longer strap I'd probably go a little lower. I think a lot of old school guys would suggest to keep it high, about the same height as sitting position.

Reasons:

- I don't play sitting, I never cared for it.

- I have some slight physical limitations with my hands.

- Rock & Roll

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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You will find a comfortable strap height over time, it totally is up to you where you put your bass. Everyone is different. High or Low, the end result must be for technique and comfort. Treat your hands for the long haul. If you can run chromatics all up and down the neck without moving your hand position too much or without too much pain, then you found your perfect strap height.

In other words- strap it on NOT for looks, but for FORM and FUNCTION. I would suggest starting a little higher than your beltine.

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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well, i have two positions.

 

whenever i am playing a song that requires a pick, is played close to the nut, requires little finger work, and is generally an easy song, i play super punk low (top of bass is below my belt).

 

if i am playing a song that is finger, or slap style, is played anywhere on the neck, requires fair amounts of finger work, and is from moderate to hard, then i play right below my chest.

 

two different rules i use: the straps either all the way extended, or half way rolled up.

 

:)

-BGO

 

5 words you should live by...

 

Music is its own reward

 

---------------

My Band: www.Myspace.com/audreyisanarcissist

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I guess I'm an old school guy. Same place, sitting or standing.

 

Actually, the single most important determinant of posture is the left wrist. It must be straight, or your wrist could explode.

 

practice standing up.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Didn't I get flamed for pretty much asking the same question about proper ergonomics while playing???

I'm a pretty tall guy too and have my strap maxed out as well. It's set to where my right wrist is straight, however. Just barely long enough. The higher up on the neck I get though, the more I have to tilt the head of the bass up to the sky.

Tenstrum

 

"Paranoid? Probably. But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face."

Harry Dresden, Storm Front

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Didn't I get flamed for pretty much asking the same question about proper ergonomics while playing??? - Tenstrum
Yes. Yes, you did. I believe it was followed by a discussion and more than a few discourses on the subject of proper technique and ergonomics.

 

Personally, I play a little low but it's what is comfortable 'cause I have long arms. I say whatever works for you is right and proper.

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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Originally posted by mattulator:

I say whatever works for you is right and proper.

I wouldn't. I'd say whatever has proved to work for you over an extended period of time is right and proper. Until your wrists have seen enough wear you won't know if your 'right and proper position' lives up to its name.

 

I'd say, "whatever gives you the best compromise between right and left wrist straightness whilst using suitable* playing technique".

 

* If you're rocking and not required to be fancy, you don't need to keep the left hand in the classical position. But if you want to do more than that, you need to be able to get your thumb behind the neck without contorting your wrist. (This is simply a special dispensation so Erik doesn't bite me).

 

Alex

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Originally posted by C. Alexander Claber:

Originally posted by mattulator:

I say whatever works for you is right and proper.

I wouldn't. I'd say whatever has proved to work for you over an extended period of time is right and proper. Until your wrists have seen enough wear you won't know if your 'right and proper position' lives up to its name.

 

I'd say, "whatever gives you the best compromise between right and left wrist straightness whilst using suitable* playing technique".

 

* If you're rocking and not required to be fancy, you don't need to keep the left hand in the classical position. But if you want to do more than that, you need to be able to get your thumb behind the neck without contorting your wrist. (This is simply a special dispensation so Erik doesn't bite me).

 

Alex

That's why I provided some visual evidence .

 

Anyway, with the 5, I have to compromise somewhat, as the upper horn digs into my ribs a bit. In any case, I've had it the way you describe since about my mid teens. No wonder I got complaints from some players when they noodled on my older Yamaha BB300 back in those days. Oh well, none of them played jazz. :D

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(For RH bass players:) Righ

  • There is less strenghth being transferred through the carpal tunnel
  • Finger muscles do a lot more of the work
  • The opposable thumb is not functioning in the same way
  • Plucking technique can vary widely, and a player can adapt the technique when pain is noticed.
     

In fact, in URB bow playing, we teach a very flexible wrist as vital to a good tone.

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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LOL! I just read that thread - pretty amusing :)

Originally posted by Tenstrum:

Didn't I get flamed for pretty much asking the same question about proper ergonomics while playing???

Tenstrum, you didn't get flamed for asking the question. You got flamed for insisting that there MUST be a formula - and because you chose to slag ('cop-out') those who told you why such a formula would be very difficult to conceive.

I used to think I was Libertarian. Until I saw their platform; now I know I'm no more Libertarian than I am RepubliCrat or neoCON or Liberal or Socialist.

 

This ain't no track meet; this is football.

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amended:

Damman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lemmy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred

http://www.dammannbasses.com/Ralphsm.jpghttp://www.anotherstateofmind.net/TS%20LEMMY.JPGhttp://www.jawireless.com/pigroast2003/thumbnails/DSCN5433.jpg

.
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Originally written by Patrick Pfeiffer in Bass Guitar for Dummies:

When you strap on your bass for the first time, I recommend that you sit down to do it. Adjusting the strap is easier this way. Ideally, the strings of the bass cross between your belt line and your belly button at a slight angle upwards (up on the neck end). This position ensures optimum right- and left-hand coverage, and it works well regardless of whether you're standing or sitting. Oh, and yes, the strings should face the outside!

 

Strapping on a bass eventually becomes as natural as riding a bike or walking, but when you first start out, you have to follow some basic instructions to get it right. If your left hand is strained when playing, try raising the height of the bass. If your right hand feels uncomfortable, try lowering the bass.

 

You can achieve the ideal compromise position for both your left and right hands when you follow these steps:

 

1. Attach the thich end of your strap to the strap pin on the body at the neck end of the bass.

 

2. Attach the thin end of your strap to the bottom pin (end pin) of the bass.

 

3. Hold your bass solidly by the body or the neck with your left hand, and pull the strap over your head and right shoulder, putting your right arm through as well.

 

Allow the strap (with bass attached) to rest on your left shoulder and continue across your back until it connects with the bottom strap pin of the bass just below the right side of your rib cage.

 

4. Adjust your strap in length until the strings are in the area between your belly button and belt buckle, and then fine-tune it from there.

 

You can find your own personal preference, but you want your bass to rest in this general area.

Bass Guitar for Dummies?! you ask, but yes, it has some good stuff in there and could cut down on repeated questions if more read it. Patrick taught Adam Clayton of U2 and the book foreword is by Will Lee.

 

ATM

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Originally posted by greenboy:

amended:

Damman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lemmy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fred

http://www.dammannbasses.com/Ralphsm.jpghttp://www.anotherstateofmind.net/TS%20LEMMY.JPGhttp://www.jawireless.com/pigroast2003/thumbnails/DSCN5433.jpg

ROTHFLMAO!!! :D:D:D
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* If you're rocking and not required to be fancy, you don't need to keep the left hand in the classical position. But if you want to do more than that, you need to be able to get your thumb behind the neck without contorting your wrist. (This is simply a special dispensation so Erik doesn't bite me).
I won't bite ya, but #6 might... not because he's pissed about what ya said... just because he tends to bite people for no good reason at all.

 

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\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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Tenstrum, you didn't get flamed for asking the question. You got flamed for insisting that there MUST be a formula - and because you chose to slag ('cop-out') those who told you why such a formula would be very difficult to conceive.
I still say that there is a formula! And I will find it one day or may name isn't "Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch"!!!!

 

Maybe lug and I should get together and write a song called: "Hunt for the Proper Ergonomic Formula". What do you say lug?

 

I said people were copping out because they were saying stuff like "whatever is comfortable".

Because I agree with C. Alexander Claber. What's comfortable now may not be later on down the road.

Tenstrum

 

"Paranoid? Probably. But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face."

Harry Dresden, Storm Front

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Flame away you guys but I don't see being comfortable as a drawback and I don't see it as a cop-out. What I do see as a drawback is seeing only one way to hold a bass (wrist just so, arms just so) because somebody wrote it down somewhere or proved they could play better than someone else by holding their instrument differently. They name streets after thought patterns like this - One Way.

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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