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Jazz Bass Set Up Question


Edendude

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I have no need to change the set up on my new Jazz Bass right now, because it's set up nicely for me as is, but with a thought to my first string change...and please forgive my ignorance if this is obvious to those of you with Fender basses...

 

I noticed the 'E' string only has the string core exposed from where it sits in the saddle and back down to the bottom of the bass. I can also see that the groove which is cut in the saddle appears to be cut to fit the narrow gauge string core, only. And not a regular gauge 'E' string.

 

So what happens when I re-string?

 

I can understand maybe having to lower the 'E' string saddle to keep the action the same with a regular string, but what about that narrow groove in the saddle?

 

Or do I have to get some specific type of 'E' string for the Jazz Bass?

 

Inquiring minds need to know.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

http://www.nova4x4.com/uploads/102004/jazzbassbridge.jpg

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Sorry Edendude - but I don't know the answer to your question, I do however have an question regarding intonating the bridge with that E string.

 

When intonating the bridge - wouldn't it present problems if you had to move the saddle towards the nut with the exposed core E string? It looks like the saddle is right up on the edge of the winding, and couldn't move towards the nut at all.

 

:confused:

 

Sorry if the question is a little ignorant - just something I noticed and haven't thought of before.

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Edendude- i dont know the answer to your question but i think a standard e string should work, usually strings dont realy go in the groove of the bridge, its sort of a guide for them, i think anywya.. im sure someone who actually plays a jazz bass will answer better though :P .

 

Eberbachl- when making any bridge adjustments aside from lowering the action, you should always loosen the string you're adjusting before you make the adjustment, especially for intonation, the saddle wont move at all on any string if you leave it in tune while adjusting because the tension form the string puts so much pressure on the saddle it cant move. This is why intonation is such a time consuming process.

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Originally posted by PickPunk:

Eberbachl- when making any bridge adjustments aside from lowering the action, you should always loosen the string you're adjusting before you make the adjustment, especially for intonation, the saddle wont move at all on any string if you leave it in tune while adjusting because the tension form the string puts so much pressure on the saddle it cant move. This is why intonation is such a time consuming process.

Yeah, I do back off a string when intonating the bridge and making saddle adjustments, I guess what I really meant was that after moving the saddle and retensioning the E string would it present problems if the saddle was "half on the windings, and half on the core" ?

 

;)

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My MIA Inca is strung with TI Flats and I have no problems, tho' I have a feeling the saddles are a little different. Still, as long as the string sits in the groove and doesn't move or the winding is resting on the saddle, I think it's a moot point.

 

http://groups.msn.com/_Secure/0UgB*A1watWzMnsS79JGK8R!OS*8GKhOMNlRafjQBdSyBXLe*2PbJxQ*OzxNS6TetGh77nZzWpMvXvgseSRrRFfYuuCL!EKRKvblAYm2Y0N91moXqf*7Mt03RqgkxVhxW/IncaSilverJazz.jpg

 

{Dang - the Image link won't work - just click on the above link to see}

 

Eberbachl - I know your point (I think) - When I set up my old 'Ray with Tobias Taper Core's, the edge of the winding was on/off the saddle. I didn't notice until my keyboardist mentioned that I sounded flat at times and thought I may have been in need of some intonation adjustments. I dropped the taper Cores and went back to my old standard strings. Problem solved.

 

Jim

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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A lot of your string change is going to depend on whether or not you want to put taper wound strings on your bass. If you're not going to use taperwounds, you're definitely going to need to adjust the saddle height. You'll also need to check your intonation as well.

 

Is the image you posted the bridge of your bass? I just find it strange that your strings are all regular wound while the E string is taper wound.

 

Now, as for the notch in the saddle, that shouldn't be an issue. The string will lock into that groove once it's at tuned tension.

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Originally posted by Nick's lab of the strange & bizarre:

A lot of your string change is going to depend on whether or not you want to put taper wound strings on your bass. If you're not going to use taperwounds, you're definitely going to need to adjust the saddle height. You'll also need to check your intonation as well.

 

Is the image you posted the bridge of your bass? I just find it strange that your strings are all regular wound while the E string is taper wound.

 

Now, as for the notch in the saddle, that shouldn't be an issue. The string will lock into that groove once it's at tuned tension.

Fender 8150s (I think that's the number) come standard on all Fender basses with string-thru-body bridges. They have a tapered E sting and tapered B, as well, on the 5-string set. They've been doing that for the past several years. The idea is that the taper-winding only benefits the heavier strings...or it's a cheap trick to save money. As far as I know, that's the only set Fender makes that has a taper-winding.

 

Every other string set Fender makes are "standard" taper, as far as I can tell. In my experience (I've restrung a couple MIA fender standard basses with the same style bridge) it makes almost no difference when you put a new set on. In fact, older Fender bridges had no grooves at all, and they seemed to work okay. I don't think it wouuld make things much worse than the (in my mind) dated design of the standard Fender bridge, at any rate. Everyone I know who gets a Fender bass these days seems to replace the bridge with a Badass II almost right away. They may be on to something...

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hehe.

Thought about getting a badass II for my MIM fretless. The stock bridge just looks so fragile and wimpy :)

 

As far as strings. Prolly just the brand of the string. not sure whats on my fretless J-Bass but my E doesnt look anything like that (in spite of being flatwound).

 

Even on my Ibanez, the taper on the string is short, like a 1/2 inch.

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It appears that the E string saddle has a small groove within a larger groove. If you look at that larger groove, you'll notice it looks just like the grooves that the other strings are sitting in on their saddles, no? My guess is that a non-tapered string would sit in there just fine.
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The stock bridge just looks so fragile and wimpy :)
Maybe that's why the stock bridge on my '71 Jazz bass has only lasted 33 years so far.... ;)

 

From the picture, I can see that your E string is taper wound. If you use a non-taper wound string you'll have to adjust the action.

 

But there will be nothing else to worry about, you and your bass will be fine.

 

Don't forget to adjust the intonation after you put on new strings. This is a must. Every brand or model of strings needs different intonation adjustments.

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Lots of excellent information from you guys as usual. Thanks.

 

I just went through some fairly involved set up on my Spector, when I went up to heavy gauge strings. I learned a lot from making inquiries here on the Lowdown forum at that time. So I figured you guys would set me straight again.

 

Good to know that a re-string with the same gauge, but in non-taperwound strings on the Jazz will only be a matter of a small action adjustment and an intonation check, as far as I can tell from your comments.

 

I checked the Fender website, and the American Jazz Bass does indeed come strung with an 'E' taperwound set. And the five comes with a taperwound B and E. Here's the Fender info on the strings, incase anyone else would like to know...

 

"Super Bass 8250M NPS, p/n 073-8250-006,

Gauges: .045, .065, .085, .110TW (Taperwound E)"

 

Two more questions...

 

What is the advantage of having a taperwound E and B string?

 

Is a taperwound E string more susceptible to breakage?

 

I notice the gauge of the E string is a 110. I'm going to keep the same gauge on this bass when I re-string with a non-tapered set of D'Addario XLs, except for the E which will be a 105. Any foreseeable issues there, aside from minor action and intonation adjustments?

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Actually, it may be a more drastic change in the action than you think. One thing you may want to do before you change strings is this: get a mechanic's ruler, or something that has both millimeter measurements or will measure down to the 32nd of an inch. Then get yourself a capo. Put the capo on your bass neck, holding down the E string at the first fret. Then fret the E string manually at the highest fret. You should then measure how high the string is above the 12th fret. Write this down, and as you try adjusting your saddle height with the new string, set everything up the same way: capo, holding the string down, and measure in the same spot. Try to get that same measurement and your action should be fine. THEN go about the process of intonating the string.

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Originally posted by Edendude:

What is the advantage of having a taperwound E and B string?

For a completely non-technical answer: not much. I think string quality is a MUCH bigger factor. Ferinstance, I recently replaced the non-tapered strings on a 5-string bass with tapered strings, and was very disappointed with the sound of the B. The non-tapered B was much better. So there are a lot more variables besides tapering; in fact, I'm pretty much indifferent to tapering, now.

 

Now on a through-body bridge, I have heard (from a friend with a Fender 5-string) that the ball end of a non-tapered B string can be very difficult to fit through the body, because of the windings at the ball end. Hence the need for a tapered B. I leave the verification/falsification of this anecdote as an exercise for the reader. It won't be an issue in this particular case, anyway.

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I've routinely gone back and forth between tapered and non-tapered ever since I got a bass. Setup was easy and only required a measurement at the neck if I wanted to be tighter than a gnat's azz. This is not rocket science.

 

I've had taper core and EXPOSED CORE (wrap wire exposed rather than just a lower winding) B strings that were better than their wound equivalent, and some that were worse. Much depends on the particular brand and type of strings, and one's own use of the strings - ie their predispositions in technique.

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The people who most benefit from taper or exposed core these days are [some] slappers, and EXTENDED RANGE players - those who are using LOWER and higfher notes than the standard (B)EADG©. The wider of a range on a fixed scale length, the more obvious its benefits in diminishing the tonal disparities.

 

And the trend with extended range players is to have MORE TENSION - actually I should say EQUAL tension to the A and D strings which in most factory sets are way more tense - on the lower strings (E, B, F# below that, or maybe they are using a different tuning entirely like in fifths, or dropped a step all across the board). Even tension for the lower pitched strings in conjunction with tapered cores makes them speak with better dynamic potential - attacks and total amplitude more even from string to string - and a tone that is closer to the upper-pitched strings.

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Hey Eden, nothing to worry about. Just string em up and play.

Then again, you can do what I did and replace the stock bridge. My MIA Jazz is a '91 so I went ahead and did the Leo Quan BadAss II bridge.

Work is getting done soon, I should have my baby back by monday night.

My expectations are high. I did some research and even posted a thread or two on here about the replacement, and after some thought I decided why not.

I may even go for a new neck with block inlay, something really nice. Buts that won't be for a lil while.

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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